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The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
A community meeting is scheduled for June 24 in Perry Hall to discuss ways to protect local streams, Bird River and the Chesapeake Bay. The meeting is set to be held at the Perry Hall branch library from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. It will be the first of two public meetings about creating an action plan for the Bird River watershed. "We want to engage people and find out their major goals for Bird River," Nathan Forand, a natural resource specialist with Baltimore County, said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Homes in Bowerman-Loreley Beach in eastern Baltimore County look like they're on prime property, with views of the Bird River and easy access to a marina. But the waterfront community also has a feature neighbors say isn't quite as idyllic: the 375-acre Eastern Sanitary Landfill. "There's no way to predict when it's going to smell," said resident Betsy Eisbart. Residents want compensation for living near the landfill, and state lawmakers are considering it. A measure is currently before the General Assembly to authorize the county to grant about 120 families near the landfill relief from property taxes.
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NEWS
By Jennifer M. Sims and Jennifer M. Sims,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2002
A 35-foot-long barge has moved into eastern Baltimore County, where it is carving out a new channel for boaters in the Bird River and Railroad Creek. The $1.3 million project, begun in October after repeated requests from waterfront communities, will create a channel to allow recreational boaters to safely navigate the two waterways. "Everybody in the community is really excited over the dredging," said Paul Eurice, president of the Harewood Park Community League. The waterways have become increasingly shallow due to buildup of silt, according to David A.C. Carroll, director of Baltimore County's Department of Environmental Protection and Resource Management.
SPORTS
By Dan Appenfeller, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
Whitney Sibol looked up to see a buoy ahead as she continued her front crawl along the Bird River in eastern Baltimore County. Like so many times before, her left arm came out of the water as she continued to swim. It was Sunday, June 3, 2012. "I'm almost there," she thought. Then, it was Thursday, and the Perry Hall High alumna was in Maryland Shock Trauma Center, her pelvis and a scapula fractured, ribs caved and left extremities devoid of feeling. Her mother, Judy, was speaking with nurses about an accident.
SPORTS
By Dan Appenfeller, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
Whitney Sibol looked up to see a buoy ahead as she continued her front crawl along the Bird River in eastern Baltimore County. Like so many times before, her left arm came out of the water as she continued to swim. It was Sunday, June 3, 2012. "I'm almost there," she thought. Then, it was Thursday, and the Perry Hall High alumna was in Maryland Shock Trauma Center, her pelvis and a scapula fractured, ribs caved and left extremities devoid of feeling. Her mother, Judy, was speaking with nurses about an accident.
NEWS
May 28, 2012
A developer claims he would be "protecting the land" by building up to 400 houses in conservation land near Bird River ("Battle lines form over site near bay" May 25). He must use the same logic as the Vietnam War officer who explained that it was "necessary to destroy the village in order to save it. " Chris Yoder, Baltimore The author is chair of the Greater Baltimore Group of the Sierra Club.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2002
A 68-year-old White Marsh man was killed in a one-alarm fire at his home yesterday morning despite a neighbor's rescue efforts. About 50 Baltimore County firefighters were called to the 11200 block of Bird River Grove Road about 3:50 a.m. after neighbors reported the fire, said Capt. Glenn Blackwell, a Fire Department spokesman. Blackwell said flames were shooting from most of the windows and the roof of the two-story house when firefighters arrived. Firefighters found the victim, Thomas N. Hayes, a short time later.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
Baltimore County officials say a sewer overflow that discharged an estimated 16,800 gallons of waste into a tributary of White Marsh Run was discovered this past week. County health department officials said the tributary flows to the Bird River, and that said the overflow resulted from a vandalized eight-inch sewer line. County utility crews contained the overflow with a pump, but officials said that due to it occurring in a wooded area, between Gunpowder Crossing Lane and Pulaski Highway, the overflow went undetected for two weeks.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2001
Six Baltimore County councilmen introduced a resolution last night calling for a commission to study council redistricting, a process in which they faced strong criticism last spring from community groups who believed there wasn't enough public input. Council Chairman Stephen G. Samuel Moxley, a Catonsville Democrat, said the commission will be appointed next month and will likely include community activists and former elected officials. The resolution sets a target of May 1 for the commission to make its report, potentially allowing amendments to the county's charter to be on the November ballot.
NEWS
By JOE NAWROZKI and JOE NAWROZKI,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
For three decades, Myrtle and William Wright enjoyed a tranquil life along Bird River Road in eastern Baltimore County's countryside.But then came the midnight riders.In what police strongly suspect is retaliation against residents who successfully fought a proposed NASCAR speedway near their homes, vandals have made death threats, destroyed lawns and wrecked mailboxes along the peaceful two-lane road bordering White Marsh and Middle River.In one incident, vandals killed a family's pet rabbit and stole 10 others from an outdoor pen. On another night, someone threw two dead cats on the front lawn of a Bird River Road resident with small children.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
A community meeting is scheduled for June 24 in Perry Hall to discuss ways to protect local streams, Bird River and the Chesapeake Bay. The meeting is set to be held at the Perry Hall branch library from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. It will be the first of two public meetings about creating an action plan for the Bird River watershed. "We want to engage people and find out their major goals for Bird River," Nathan Forand, a natural resource specialist with Baltimore County, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 1, 2013
Baltimore County officials say a sewer overflow that discharged an estimated 16,800 gallons of waste into a tributary of White Marsh Run was discovered this past week. County health department officials said the tributary flows to the Bird River, and that said the overflow resulted from a vandalized eight-inch sewer line. County utility crews contained the overflow with a pump, but officials said that due to it occurring in a wooded area, between Gunpowder Crossing Lane and Pulaski Highway, the overflow went undetected for two weeks.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
Baltimore County is set to resume testing certain recreational waters for harmful bacteria, two years after budget cuts ended the monitoring. The county is mandated by the federal government to sample water at public bathing beaches - those with lifeguards and shower and restroom facilities, county health department spokeswoman Monique Lyle said. Now, it plans to expand testing to recreational waters that are not required to be monitored, including Back River, Bear Creek, Bird River and parts of the Patapsco River.
NEWS
By Jennifer Bevan-Dangel | July 9, 2012
With all the recent press over the proposed redevelopment of the Solo Cup site in Owings Mills, the casual reader would think this is an isolated issue that boils down to one community that will see new traffic patterns or new places to shop. But Solo Cup is just one piece of a conversation that will affect neighborhoods across Baltimore County. A conversation that is expressed in upzoning (to allow more intense development on a property) and downzoning (to allow less). A conservation that is expressed in community desires and developer dollars.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2012
The Baltimore County Council member from Middle River said Thursday that she is opposed to allowing a riverfront housing development on conservation land in her district, which would be the largest project ever outside a long-standing growth-control boundary. Cathy Bevins said she plans to vote against a zoning change on farm and wooded land along Bird River in Middle River that was opposed by the county's environmental agency, local preservationists and most neighbors. The requested change would allow hundreds of houses to be built on land where three homes are now allowed.
NEWS
May 29, 2012
After many years of frustration, the map accompanying the story about waterfront development near White Marsh ("Battle lines form over site near bay," May 25) forces me to ask: When is The Sun going to provide graphics containing useful information pertinent to the story? For example, the article describes 292 acres of woods and fields now zoned for conservation. Wouldn't a topographic map or aerial view have been a better depiction of the land and the surrounding area? And how about introducing actual property lines rather than a dot indicating the general area?
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1999
James Withrow has taken his house off the market, Linda Felts may lose her dream home, and Russell Rose is not sure how much longer he will have his backyard vegetable garden.The neighbors along Bird River Road in the Middle River area are angry that their homes could be demolished because they are in the path of one of five routes proposed for Route 43, a $60 million highway connecting White Marsh with the Middle River corridor."Our lives are completely on hold by what the state is doing here," said Felts, 38.They plan to argue against the highway at a public hearing in Essex on Wednesday night, launch a petition drive and lobby state and county officials to keep the highway from being built.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,sun reporter | August 26, 2006
On summer mornings, Dorothy Hinnant drinks coffee on the front porch of her home in the Loreley Beach area of White Marsh. She savors the quiet neighborhood and, she says, the occasional glimpses of bald eagles soaring over nearby Bird River. But she worries that her peace will soon end. Across the street from her home, developers plan to pave over a 15-acre wooded area that has been abandoned since the Pulaski Drive-In Theater closed decades ago. CarMax, which operates a car lot at another location in White Marsh, intends to repair and auction cars to dealers on the site.
NEWS
May 28, 2012
A developer claims he would be "protecting the land" by building up to 400 houses in conservation land near Bird River ("Battle lines form over site near bay" May 25). He must use the same logic as the Vietnam War officer who explained that it was "necessary to destroy the village in order to save it. " Chris Yoder, Baltimore The author is chair of the Greater Baltimore Group of the Sierra Club.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2010
Baltimore County officials estimate about 15,000 gallons of untreated sewage spilled into the creek that flows into Bird and Gunpowder rivers this week. The sewage leaked from a damaged 8-inch sewer line that was damaged by recent heavy rains and a dislodged sewer manhole near White Marsh Run. County utility crews completed temporary repairs Tuesday and have restored normal flow in the line. The county has posted signs advising residents to avoid contact with the waters of White Marsh Run and Bird River in the Silver Hill Farm West area in the eastern part of the county.
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