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Bird Feeders

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NEWS
May 10, 1994
Maryland Department of Natural Resources wildlife specialists cautioned songbird lovers yesterday to keep bird feeders clean, after reports of isolated outbreaks of disease among some finches and sparrows.Edith Thompson, DNR urban wildlife biologist, said sick or dead songbirds have been spotted this spring around the state, although most reports have come from the Baltimore-Washington area."We've had more reports than normal," Ms. Thompson said, adding that there is no link between the diseased songbirds and the avian cholera that killed more than 35,000 waterfowl this winter on and around the Chesapeake Bay.Ms.
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NEWS
January 18, 2013
"Rats! They fought the dogs and killed the cats, and bit the babies in the cradles ... " Baltimore County's rat problems may not be as hair-raising as those above in Robert Browning's poem "The Pied Piper of Hamelin," but the disease-spreading vermin are an enduring presence in the yards and alleys of many neighborhoods. The county's response to rodent infestation is Rid Rat, a complaint-driven program that gathers data from phone calls (on a phone line dedicated to rat problems)
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NEWS
December 26, 2003
In Baltimore City Residents urged to recycle gift-wrap, boxes, holiday cards The city Department of Public Works has issued a reminder for Baltimore residents to recycle gift-wrap rather than throwing it away. Recyclable items include cardboard boxes and packaging, wrapping paper, tissue paper, colored paper, holiday cards, gift cards and envelopes. The city does not recycle ribbon, foil or foam packing material. For more information, call 311. Walbrook library branch schedules Kwanzaa event The Walbrook branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library will hold "Telling for Kwanzaa," a one-hour holiday presentation featuring the storytelling troupe the Growing Griots, at 2 p.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Milton Lee Eckstein Jr., a retired grocery store manager and fast-pitch softball player, died of complications from cancer Saturday at his Inwood, W.Va., home. He was 84 and had lived in Joppa. Born in Rosedale, he attended Kenwood High School. He worked at A&P grocery stores for 27 years, including one on Sinclair Lane, where he was manager. He later became head of maintenance for Maryland General Hospital. He also owned a business, E&M Home Improvement. In 1984, he was inducted into the Maryland Fastpitch Hall of Fame.
NEWS
By Marty Ross | December 28, 2003
Bird watching is the perfect hobby for a busy world. You can do it while you're on the phone and while on your way to take the kids to soccer practice. You can watch birds at a bus stop or while you eat a sandwich. "Bird watching is the fastest-growing outdoor activity," says John Bianchi, a spokesman for the National Audubon Society. About 71-million Americans are bird watchers, Bianchi says, and more than 60 million have bird feeders in their back yards. While we're enjoying the bright flash of a goldfinch, the antics of a blue jay or the determined progress of a wren as she looks for insects in the fissured bark of an old oak, we're also becoming conservationists.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
"Rats! They fought the dogs and killed the cats, and bit the babies in the cradles ... " Baltimore County's rat problems may not be as hair-raising as those above in Robert Browning's poem "The Pied Piper of Hamelin," but the disease-spreading vermin are an enduring presence in the yards and alleys of many neighborhoods. The county's response to rodent infestation is Rid Rat, a complaint-driven program that gathers data from phone calls (on a phone line dedicated to rat problems)
EXPLORE
November 23, 2011
Dumb animals can be pretty smart. Looking out our kitchen window the other day, my wife glanced into our neighbors' yard, where they've got one of those bird feeders fixed with a barrier to keep squirrels from getting at the goodies. It was hanging by a thread from one of their trees. Hanging onto the feeder from a cylindrical piece at the bottom was a squirrel. The feeder spun around as it dangled from the branch, and the squirrel twirled along with it. "Whee!" I said, laughing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
Animal Planet and Comcast are giving families plenty of opportunities to get up close and personal with animals this weekend. The Animal Planet Expo comes to Centennial Park in Ellicott City on Saturday and Sunday. "There's something for everyone at the Animal Planet Expo," said Benne Gallion, a marketing representative for Discovery Networks. Visitors can see dog flying disc demonstrations and other animal shows, participate in animal trivia games, watch films in the Animal Planet Expo Theater and get a preview of the Discovery Channel's new series, Atlas, in the Discovery HD Theatre Dome.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 2, 1996
Pine cones, peanut butter and seeds make good bird feeders. Deer need grass, water and shelter to survive. Grass, in turn, needs water and space to thrive.Children can learn these and other basics at hourlong educational programs sponsored by the Patuxent Research Refuge -- North Tract in Laurel. The refuge offers a selection of free programs for children 4 and older, as well as nature programs for all ages."One of the missions of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is to educate the public about nature and resources," said Marion Kinlein, outdoor recreation planner at the North Tract.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Milton Lee Eckstein Jr., a retired grocery store manager and fast-pitch softball player, died of complications from cancer Saturday at his Inwood, W.Va., home. He was 84 and had lived in Joppa. Born in Rosedale, he attended Kenwood High School. He worked at A&P grocery stores for 27 years, including one on Sinclair Lane, where he was manager. He later became head of maintenance for Maryland General Hospital. He also owned a business, E&M Home Improvement. In 1984, he was inducted into the Maryland Fastpitch Hall of Fame.
EXPLORE
November 23, 2011
Dumb animals can be pretty smart. Looking out our kitchen window the other day, my wife glanced into our neighbors' yard, where they've got one of those bird feeders fixed with a barrier to keep squirrels from getting at the goodies. It was hanging by a thread from one of their trees. Hanging onto the feeder from a cylindrical piece at the bottom was a squirrel. The feeder spun around as it dangled from the branch, and the squirrel twirled along with it. "Whee!" I said, laughing.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | January 24, 2009
In winter, my backyard looks like the mall food court. Dozens of birds line up at my feeders and suet holders like hungry teenagers: jays, flickers, wrens, house sparrows, cardinals, all shoving each other out of the way. This time of year, there is also plenty of action in what my son calls "the bird hot tub," a heated birdbath that does not freeze when other sources of water do. I am not a knowledgeable bird-watcher, but I love to sit in my kitchen...
NEWS
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | February 4, 2007
If you're looking for great garden design ideas, perhaps a little bird can give you some pointers. Wild birds have a terrific sense for landscaping, and if you let their ideas of what is right, proper and needful inspire your garden's design, you'll have a wonderful garden -- lively, pretty and full of color, life and song. One of the very best things you can do to make your garden more attractive to birds is to plant a songbird flower bed, says Steve Kress, a bird conservation expert and vice president of the National Audubon Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | August 17, 2006
Animal Planet and Comcast are giving families plenty of opportunities to get up close and personal with animals this weekend. The Animal Planet Expo comes to Centennial Park in Ellicott City on Saturday and Sunday. "There's something for everyone at the Animal Planet Expo," said Benne Gallion, a marketing representative for Discovery Networks. Visitors can see dog flying disc demonstrations and other animal shows, participate in animal trivia games, watch films in the Animal Planet Expo Theater and get a preview of the Discovery Channel's new series, Atlas, in the Discovery HD Theatre Dome.
NEWS
August 9, 2004
Still no reason for Md. to allow killing of bears It's shocking that The Sun's editorial page has reversed its position on Maryland's attempt to open a trophy hunt for black bears ("Maryland's bear season," editorial, Aug. 3), because not much has changed since the paper published its opposition to that same radical shift in our half-century-old wildlife policy ("Bearing the burden," editorial, Jan. 25, 2000). The bear population is still small, estimated at only a few hundred animals.
NEWS
By Marty Ross | December 28, 2003
Bird watching is the perfect hobby for a busy world. You can do it while you're on the phone and while on your way to take the kids to soccer practice. You can watch birds at a bus stop or while you eat a sandwich. "Bird watching is the fastest-growing outdoor activity," says John Bianchi, a spokesman for the National Audubon Society. About 71-million Americans are bird watchers, Bianchi says, and more than 60 million have bird feeders in their back yards. While we're enjoying the bright flash of a goldfinch, the antics of a blue jay or the determined progress of a wren as she looks for insects in the fissured bark of an old oak, we're also becoming conservationists.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2000
Plundered beehives and ransacked bird feeders were the tell-tale signs. But for proof that a bear is roaming parts of northern Baltimore County, you can go to the tape. See the bear peek over the rim of the above-ground swimming pool. Watch it drink from the pond and scrounge for food. See it flop down on its haunches, sittin' and chillin' - right there behind Teresa Snodgrass' cabin in the woods. "He looked like a circus bear, really well-mannered," said Snodgrass, who captured the animal on videotape one recent evening at her family's home near Prettyboy Reservoir.
SPORTS
By Lonny Weaver and Lonny Weaver,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 1998
I have had some health problems this winter that have kept me sidelined throughout the hunting season, but have enabled me to completely enjoy my backyard bird feeders. Though I am not a bird watcher, in the popular sense of the term, backyard bird feeding has always given me and my family a great deal of pleasure. And we enjoy identifying the dozens of varieties of birds that pay us visits.My favorite visitors are the cardinals with their bright red feathers and their "cheer, cheer, cheer" songs.
NEWS
December 26, 2003
In Baltimore City Residents urged to recycle gift-wrap, boxes, holiday cards The city Department of Public Works has issued a reminder for Baltimore residents to recycle gift-wrap rather than throwing it away. Recyclable items include cardboard boxes and packaging, wrapping paper, tissue paper, colored paper, holiday cards, gift cards and envelopes. The city does not recycle ribbon, foil or foam packing material. For more information, call 311. Walbrook library branch schedules Kwanzaa event The Walbrook branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library will hold "Telling for Kwanzaa," a one-hour holiday presentation featuring the storytelling troupe the Growing Griots, at 2 p.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
December 13, 2001
Kinder Farm Park will offer a "Family Bird Feeder Building Workshop" at 1 p.m. Sunday at the park. Families will build a cedar bird feeder. The fee, which must be paid in advance, is $10 per family. Participants should take a cordless drill with a 1/8-inch drill bit and a Phillips screwdriver. All other materials will be provided. "Wildbird Wreath Making" will be offered at 11 a.m. Dec. 22 at the park. Youths ages 6 to 14 can join Ranger Brian to look for common winter birds and then create an "all-natural bird wreath."
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