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By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. played the accidental role of grim reaper for a half-dozen state employees this week. Just hours after the governor toured the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute on Monday and praised its marine life research, the institute's president handed out layoff notices to several midlevel managers. "It was pure coincidence," said Ehrlich spokeswoman Shareese DeLeaver. "The UMBI visit was a visit that was supposed to occur several months ago, but it had to be postponed due to scheduling.
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NEWS
May 23, 2007
DNR, biotech institute sign crab study pact Maryland's Department of Natural Resources and the University of Maryland's Biotechnology Institute have signed a 10-year agreement that will help researchers continue a multimillion-dollar effort to study the blue crab. The agreement, officially announced yesterday, lets the researchers continue to use Piney Point, an old state oyster hatchery in Southern Maryland. Since 2004, scientists with the Center for Marine Biotechnology, which is part of the biotechnology institute, have been using Piney Point to raise crabs bred in their hatchery in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
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NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton announced yesterday that he will nominate Rita R. Colwell, president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, to become the deputy director the National Science Foundation.The federal agency, which has a $3.3 billion annual budget, sponsors research in science and engineering that has no immediate commercial application. Colwell, 63, is the founding president of Maryland's biotechnology institute, which is intended, in part, to foster collaborative efforts between Maryland researchers and start-up companies.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | May 7, 2007
In a basement laboratory tucked amid the tourist attractions of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, two Israeli-born scientists are unlocking the mysteries of the Chesapeake Bay blue crab. Over the past five years, Yonathan Zohar and Odi Zmora have spent most of their waking hours poring over tanks filled with the snapping crustaceans and their tiny offspring at a University of Maryland lab on Pratt Street. They feed the crabs homemade algae tailored to their life stage. The researchers control the water temperature, light and salinity, and document the crustaceans' every move as they shed their shells, mate and reproduce.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Staff writers Mark Guidera and Doug Birch contributed to this story | November 3, 1995
Rita R. Colwell, the head of the University of Maryland $H Biotechnology Institute, was passed over yesterday for the president's job at Oregon State University.Dr. Colwell was one of three finalists for the post. The Oregon State Board of Higher Education instead tapped Paul G. Risser, the president of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.Dr. Colwell, who has been a leader in Maryland's high-profile effort to spur biotechnology research in the state, spent the last four days meeting with faculty, students and others at Oregon State.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
The Columbus Center's name will change and vacant offices there will be leased to nonprofit groups, but most aspects of the marine biotechnology institute at Baltimore's Inner Harbor will remain the same.That was the assessment yesterday of the top official of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute after this week's agreement by the university system to purchase the financially troubled facility."It won't be called the Columbus Center," said Peter P. McCann, interim president of the institute, which would operate the building.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
The chairman of the finance committee of the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents said yesterday that the group hopes to find a tenant to move into the Inner Harbor's long-vacant Hall of Exploration by the summer. The committee met in executive session for about an hour and a half yesterday, with the fate of the hall's roughly 50,000 square feet of space as its sole topic. David H. Nevins, chairman of the committee, said they hope to issue a request for proposals for the space within two months.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,sun reporter | January 17, 2007
A decade after state leaders recruited AIDS researcher Dr. Robert C. Gallo to Baltimore, his virology institute is moving to the University of Maryland Medical School. The change, announced yesterday, is more organizational than physical, with the Institute of Human Virology staying in the same modern facility on West Lombard Street where it has been since its establishment in 1996. But with the signing of a memorandum of understanding last week, the IHV is no longer a part of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute - a multipronged entity with research centers in Rockville, College Park and Baltimore.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1998
ADELPHI -- Pioneering AIDS researcher Robert C. Gallo gained a new academic home for his Institute of Human Virology yesterday, transferring from one branch of the University System of Maryland to another in a move officials said they hoped would help ensure the future of the high-profile laboratory.During its annual meeting here, the University System Board of Regents approved a transfer of Gallo's institute from the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute to the University of Maryland, Baltimore, which operates the state's medical school and other professional schools.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2001
The fate of the long-vacant Hall of Exploration, an interactive science museum on the Inner Harbor, will be the sole topic Monday at a meeting of the finance committee of the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents. That group hopes to devise a strategy for bringing one or more tenants into the building by summer. "We feel the time is right to aggressively and comprehensively market the facility," said David H. Nevins, chairman of the committee and president of Nevins & Associates, a marketing and public relations firm.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,sun reporter | January 17, 2007
A decade after state leaders recruited AIDS researcher Dr. Robert C. Gallo to Baltimore, his virology institute is moving to the University of Maryland Medical School. The change, announced yesterday, is more organizational than physical, with the Institute of Human Virology staying in the same modern facility on West Lombard Street where it has been since its establishment in 1996. But with the signing of a memorandum of understanding last week, the IHV is no longer a part of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute - a multipronged entity with research centers in Rockville, College Park and Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frank Burch and Dan Morhaim | December 24, 2006
Aquaculturists growing blue crabs that might help restore the Chesapeake Bay and fish that could help feed the world. Doctors and scientists collaborating on vaccines that will help future generations live without the fear of AIDS or Alzheimer's. Skilled workers crafting contact lenses with micro-detectors that measure blood sugar and medication levels, eliminating the need for repeat blood tests. Maryland's burgeoning life sciences industry brings more than just economic development. As these examples show, it offers opportunities to benefit all humanity by curing illness, cleaning the environment and providing food for millions.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2006
Ecological message part of terrapin tale Rascal, a one-year-old terrapin, stretches his neck out while he suns himself on a rock, his mouth turned upward in what appears to be a permanent grin. The small turtle lives up to his name, hurriedly scampering away from his owner's reach. "Turtles have great personalities," said Jennifer Keats Curtis, 37, Rascal's owner. "They're not shy, and they're fast."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. played the accidental role of grim reaper for a half-dozen state employees this week. Just hours after the governor toured the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute on Monday and praised its marine life research, the institute's president handed out layoff notices to several midlevel managers. "It was pure coincidence," said Ehrlich spokeswoman Shareese DeLeaver. "The UMBI visit was a visit that was supposed to occur several months ago, but it had to be postponed due to scheduling.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
The chairman of the finance committee of the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents said yesterday that the group hopes to find a tenant to move into the Inner Harbor's long-vacant Hall of Exploration by the summer. The committee met in executive session for about an hour and a half yesterday, with the fate of the hall's roughly 50,000 square feet of space as its sole topic. David H. Nevins, chairman of the committee, said they hope to issue a request for proposals for the space within two months.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2001
The fate of the long-vacant Hall of Exploration, an interactive science museum on the Inner Harbor, will be the sole topic Monday at a meeting of the finance committee of the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents. That group hopes to devise a strategy for bringing one or more tenants into the building by summer. "We feel the time is right to aggressively and comprehensively market the facility," said David H. Nevins, chairman of the committee and president of Nevins & Associates, a marketing and public relations firm.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2006
Ecological message part of terrapin tale Rascal, a one-year-old terrapin, stretches his neck out while he suns himself on a rock, his mouth turned upward in what appears to be a permanent grin. The small turtle lives up to his name, hurriedly scampering away from his owner's reach. "Turtles have great personalities," said Jennifer Keats Curtis, 37, Rascal's owner. "They're not shy, and they're fast."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1995
With time running out, Maryland's political and academic leaders are offering public money and research space in what Gov. Parris N. Glendening calls a "full-court press" to lure world-famous AIDS researcher Dr. Robert C. Gallo to Baltimore.Dr. Gallo, who discovered two leukemia viruses and is credited with crucial findings in the biology of AIDS, has made numerous visits to Baltimore in recent months -- meeting with Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke on Monday.He has dined with Mr. Glendening, toured research facilities at the University of Maryland at Baltimore and conferred with academic leaders, including Dr. David J. Ramsay, president of UMAB; Dr. Donald Wilson, dean of its medical school; and Dr. Rita R. Colwell, president of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
The Columbus Center's name will change and vacant offices there will be leased to nonprofit groups, but most aspects of the marine biotechnology institute at Baltimore's Inner Harbor will remain the same.That was the assessment yesterday of the top official of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute after this week's agreement by the university system to purchase the financially troubled facility."It won't be called the Columbus Center," said Peter P. McCann, interim president of the institute, which would operate the building.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
WITHOUT A whole lot of fanfare, the University System of Maryland turns 10 this month.Donald N. Langenberg, chancellor for eight of those years, blew out the symbolic candles and issued a report "celebrating a decade."The system -- 11 campuses, an environmental science center and a biotechnology institute -- formed in 1988 with the marriage of the old state college system and the University of Maryland.Morgan State University and St. Mary's College in Southern Maryland, the other two public schools in Maryland, opted out.Here, based on interviews this week with Langenberg and several observers in and out of the system, are questions and consensus answers about USM at 10:Creation of the system was supposed to promote efficiency.
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