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NEWS
September 27, 2002
A large crowd was expected last night at the last of four City Council hearings on legislation that would allow the city to seize up to 3,300 properties for an East Baltimore biotech park and hundreds of units of new and renovated housing units. The evening hearing was scheduled at Elmer A. Henderson Elementary School in the heavily blighted Middle East neighborhood just north of the Johns Hopkins medical complex, where the biotech park and two-thirds of the properties to be condemned are to be located.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2010
While some sectors of Maryland's economy struggle to shake free of the Great Recession, the biotechnology parks adjacent to Baltimore's two top teaching hospitals stubbornly continue to add laboratories, offices and — most importantly for the city — jobs. The gains have been both large and small, and not always along the path or at the pace envisioned when the parks were created. But the growth is unmistakable, fueled by the critical mass of expertise, resources and discoveries at both the Johns Hopkins and University of Maryland Baltimore medical campuses.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2002
Several East Baltimore residents told a City Council hearing last night that they wanted to remain in their longtime homes rather than have the city acquire their properties as part of a sweeping revitalization plan that would create a biotech park and hundreds of units of new and renovated housing. "I would like my name off that [acquisition] list," said Gloria M. Bolding, who has lived for 42 years in the 1400 block of N. Patterson Park Ave." I'll be 65 this year, and I don't see where I need to go anywhere and start over."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | August 26, 2007
Donald Gresham is willing to vacate his home of 20 years, but he will never leave East Baltimore, his lifelong neighborhood. "It's where I grew up, where I was educated, where my history is and where I am staying," Gresham told a crowd of nearly 100 gathered yesterday for a housing conference at the East Baltimore Community Resource Center. "I don't plan to go anywhere." But, like many in the crowd, Gresham will have to go somewhere. His two-bedroom rowhouse on Chester Street is slated for demolition.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
Jennifer Jones is looking to expand her home improvement business, and yesterday she met the people who could help make it happen. Several key players in a planned biotech park on Baltimore's east side told Jones and a few hundred other business owners attending the fourth annual African American Business Forum about the business opportunities the park would bring. The project is expected to produce 8,000 jobs, millions of dollars in investment and hundreds of new and rehabilitated homes, city officials said.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2002
A large crowd was expected last night at the last of four City Council hearings on legislation that would allow the city to seize up to 3,300 properties for an East Baltimore biotech park and hundreds of units of new and renovated housing units. The evening hearing was scheduled at Elmer A. Henderson Elementary School in the heavily blighted Middle East neighborhood just north of the Johns Hopkins medical complex, where the biotech park and two-thirds of the properties to be condemned are to be located.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2001
WHILE JOHNS Hopkins struggled this week with the aftershocks of a four-day federal ban on studies involving humans, many neighbors were not sorry that Hopkins got a comeuppance from the feds. "It's the talk of the community: `It's about time,'" said Glenn Ross, head of McElderry Park Community Association. "Many in the community felt Hopkins was untouchable." So the feeling is Hopkins learned some much-needed humility in the past week? "Exactly." "To the neighborhood, it was nice," agreed Lucille Gorham, head of Middle East Community Organization.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2002
The success of a proposed business park for biotechnology companies on the University of Maryland, Baltimore campus will depend almost solely on the answer to an obvious question: What's the demand? It is a question made all the more urgent as the city moves ahead with a proposal for an east-side biotech park adjacent to the Johns Hopkins University's medical complex - one that could contain up to 2 million square feet of space. The answer right now is that no one knows. Nationally, the biotechnology industry is growing explosively, thanks in part to the recent sequencing of the human genome.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2002
The University of Maryland, Baltimore is taking steps to transform a swath of land west of its downtown campus into a cluster of privately owned biotechnology companies, a move that comes as the city simultaneously seeks to develop an east-side biotech park. The west-side business park, planned for a two- to three-block stretch west of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and north of Baltimore Street, so far is little more than a shaded area on a map. But, unlike the project planned adjacent to the Johns Hopkins University medical complex on the city's east side, UMB's plan involves land that is largely city-owned, and much of it is now vacant.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
Montgomery County and the state announced plans yesterday to create two business parks for science and technology companies, bringing the number of government-backed bioscience parks being considered in Maryland to at least five - including two in Baltimore. Montgomery County is home to more than 200 of the state's roughly 300 biotechnology companies. The proposals come just as Baltimore begins planning parks to attract the same kinds of businesses. Montgomery County Economic Development Director David W. Edgerley acknowledged yesterday that the new parks, modeled after the successful - and now full - Shady Grove Life Sciences Center in Rockville, could compete for tenants with Baltimore.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | July 26, 2007
A plan to build a sprawling $800 million biotechnology park adjacent to Johns Hopkins Hospital has some East Baltimore residents worried that they will not be able to afford to buy new homes in the area despite the roughly $150,000 they will receive for homes that will be demolished to make way for offices, shops and residences. East Baltimore Development Inc., a nonprofit organization created by the city to manage the project, has promised to come up with money from an equity fund and specially tailored mortgage loans to help residents buy new houses, which are expected to have a starting price of $250,000.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,sun reporter | December 6, 2006
When the University of Maryland, Baltimore picked the southern edge of Poppleton as the home for its new biotechnology-focused business park, there was a lot of talk about the entry-level work it would bring to the city's west side. Local politicians said the park would be a major source of job growth for the region and help revitalize the community, blighted at times by drugs and crime. And school officials promised training programs to help residents fill up to one-third of the positions created.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun reporter | September 28, 2006
Hundreds more vacant properties will be acquired - some to be rehabilitated, many to be razed - and as many as 300 additional families are likely to lose their homes in the second and final stage of the huge East Baltimore redevelopment project centered on a biotech park. A recommended plan calls for the acquisition and demolition of roughly two-thirds of the remaining 339 occupied residential and commercial properties - part of a sweeping proposal to create thousands of jobs and transform one of the most decayed areas of the city with new housing and research facilities.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2006
John G. Rangos Sr., a Pittsburgh philanthropist, has promised to give $10 million for work at several academic research centers planned for the Johns Hopkins University's biotechnology park in East Baltimore, the university said yesterday. The announcement of the gift came as the university broke ground on the $800 million, 80-acre project on Wolfe Street just north of Hopkins' medical campus. The gift is tied with 16 others as the 23rd-largest in the history of the university, said Dennis O'Shea, a university spokesman.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | April 17, 2006
The plans have been laid, the residents relocated, the land cleared, and at long last - after a ceremonial groundbreaking event today - construction is set to begin on the first building in a new biotech park that supporters hope will transform East Baltimore and the city. The new building, which developers expect to be completed by 2008, is a six-story, 282,000-square- foot, $120 million life science center bounded by Wolfe, Chapel and Madison streets and Ashland Avenue. It is part of the first phase of the renewal project, which is to extend over 31 acres and include five life science buildings as well as three parking garages, 900 units of housing, 40,000 square feet of retail space and several acres of new parks.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL and ERIC SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | January 3, 2006
The long-awaited groundbreaking for the first life sciences building in the proposed East Baltimore biotechnology park north of the Johns Hopkins medical complex is tentatively set for sometime this month, according to the head of the nonprofit in charge of the redevelopment effort. "It will be a major milestone for the project," said Jack Shannon, president and chief executive of East Baltimore Development Inc., the nonprofit set up by the city to replace 80 acres of mostly blighted buildings with a biotech park, retail space and hundreds of units of new and renovated housing.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2004
The city Board of Estimates unanimously approved two land deals yesterday that advance development prospects that are considered important to East Baltimore's revitalization. A private developer and a nonprofit development agency received technical control of two parcels north of Johns Hopkins medical complex, where the city hopes to create a biotech park. The first deal was a promise to sell 77 housing units to Collington Partners in an area bordered by the 2200 blocks of E. Biddle St. and Mura St. and the 1200 blocks of N. Collington Ave. and N. Patterson Park Ave. The $206,000 sale is contingent on the developer's ability to win $12 million in federal tax credits.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2001
In a bold new effort to reinvigorate the decayed area north of the Johns Hopkins medical complex in East Baltimore, the O'Malley administration is pushing ahead with a preliminary plan for a major biotechnology park and up to 1,000 housing units. Developed after months of study and to be done in stages over several years, the plan could require the demolition of hundreds of properties, many of them vacant and in need of repair, and displace a still-to-be-determined number of homeowners and renters in a 50-acre pie-shaped swath.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
Lucille Gorham has watched firsthand for decades as her East Baltimore neighborhood has deteriorated since her family moved there in 1931. The blocks around Gorham's East Chase Street house have gone from a family neighborhood with clean stoops and streets to a trash-strewn stretch of boarded-up houses inhabited by addicts and drug dealers. Now Gorham, 72, is moving out to make way for the wrecking balls and construction cranes that will begin the transformation of her dilapidated neighborhood into new townhouses and high-tech businesses as part of a redevelopment project officially kicked off yesterday.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2004
The city Board of Estimates unanimously approved two land deals yesterday that advance development prospects that are considered important to East Baltimore's revitalization. A private developer and a nonprofit development agency received technical control of two parcels north of Johns Hopkins medical complex, where the city hopes to create a biotech park. The first deal was a promise to sell 77 housing units to Collington Partners in an area bordered by the 2200 blocks of E. Biddle St. and Mura St. and the 1200 blocks of N. Collington Ave. and N. Patterson Park Ave. The $206,000 sale is contingent on the developer's ability to win $12 million in federal tax credits.
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