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By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Baltimore's biotechnology industry has made strides. Two biotech parks by the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland now anchor the east and west sides of the city. A few dozen biotech startups have made their home here. But Baltimore's nascent biotech industry doesn't yet have a breakout company — a darling of venture capitalists and Wall Street that has grown past the risky and unprofitable startup phase to achieve a steady stream of revenue and products in the pipeline.
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NEWS
By Scott Eldridge | July 4, 2013
The Food and Drug Administration's plans to streamline the approval process for "breakthrough" drugs that treat life-threatening diseases is great news for patients and has enormous potential for our pharmaceutical industry, already in the midst of an innovation explosion. Unfortunately, in the middle of all this progress, political leaders in Washington are pushing proposals that would severely undermine innovation and deliver a crippling blow to Maryland's biotech industry. Lawmakers must understand that without a favorable policy environment, innovation can grind to a halt.
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NEWS
By Scott Eldridge | July 4, 2013
The Food and Drug Administration's plans to streamline the approval process for "breakthrough" drugs that treat life-threatening diseases is great news for patients and has enormous potential for our pharmaceutical industry, already in the midst of an innovation explosion. Unfortunately, in the middle of all this progress, political leaders in Washington are pushing proposals that would severely undermine innovation and deliver a crippling blow to Maryland's biotech industry. Lawmakers must understand that without a favorable policy environment, innovation can grind to a halt.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
A proposal to speed the approval of new prescription drugs has patient advocates and biotech firms — including many based in Maryland — hoping that Congress will deliver a rare dose of bipartisanship this year. Lawmakers are proposing a 6 percent increase in the fees that pharmaceutical firms pay the Food and Drug Administration to offset the cost of approving new drugs. If the measure is not signed into law by the end of September, the FDA would lose the ability to charge any fees and be forced to lay off 2,000 workers, significantly slowing review times.
BUSINESS
By Paula L. Green and Paula L. Green,Journal of Commerce | July 4, 1992
The biotechnology industry in the United States appears to be heading toward a collision with most of the world over the regulation of genetically altered food products.The U.S. industry praises a recent U.S. government decision minimizing regulation, but the European Community is preparing a directive on "novel foods," the regulatory requirements for which could hamper exports of such items to the EC."I'm not aware of the EC proposal, but there is worry that this [regulatory issue] could be a trade weapon . . . . The politicizing of an issue [could be used]
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | July 26, 1992
The money men of HealthCare Investment Corp. work the Amtrak line, whizzing back and forth between Maryland's biotechnology corner in the Washington suburbs and Baltimore, Philadelphia and Boston.Along the way these venture capitalists have staked hundreds of millions of dollars on the dreams of science and founded companies with breathtaking speed: Genetic Therapy Inc. in 1986, Molecular Oncology Inc. in 1988, MedImmune Inc. in 1988, and Pharmavene Inc. in 1990.That's just in Maryland. There are 20 others scattered along the path of the Metroliner, and by the end of this year they promise to start three more biotech companies in Maryland, including one in Baltimore, with another three due by 1995.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
In a conference room in downtown Baltimore, F. Blix Winston compared the Food and Drug Administration to a "slow-moving bulldog. " "You don't want to get bitten," Winston, an expert on the federal regulation of medical devices, told a crowd of about 50 entrepreneurs and academics recently. "You don't want to tangle with the FDA," he warned. "The FDA has the power to come in and padlock a company's doors. " Winston's presentation was part of a new approach by Maryland economic development officials to promote the state's life sciences industry.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
The teenagers filed into the Ellicott City laboratory, slapped on safety goggles, whipped out notebooks and peered expectantly at their instructor, who promptly delivered directions that sounded as if they were in a foreign language. Teacher Cindy Coffman tossed around technical terms - such as "GFP samples," "caustic reagents" and "isolated proteins" - like confetti, eventually declaring that something needed to be vortexed "right away!" And the dutiful group soon did, with barely so much as a quizzical glance.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1993
In a sign the local biotech industry might be maturing, a Baltimore company has agreed to manufacture small quantities of an anti-cancer drug for a Virginia company.Collaborations have been rare among local biotech companies, but Cel-Sci Corp., a publicly traded biotech company in Alexandria, signed a deal with Chesapeake Biological Laboratories yesterday."There is starting to be enough of a critical mass here to support some collaborations," said Geert Kersten, Cel-Sci chief operating officer.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2010
Fourteen Maryland biotechnology companies tapped nearly $6 million in new funding from investors who qualified for a state tax credit. The Biotechnology Investment Incentive Tax Credit is a state-mandated program that allows for a 50 percent tax break, up to $250,000, per investor in a qualified biotech company. To qualify, companies must be less than 12 years old, have headquarters in Maryland, employ fewer than 50 people and be state-certified as a biotechnology company. The tax credit is a central component of Gov. Martin O'Malley's BioMaryland 2020 plan, a 10-year, $1.3 billion strategy for growing the state's biotech industry.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Ken Malone and the board members of his startup biotech company gathered in a conference room at the University of Southern Mississippi last October to make a gut-wrenching decision. Ablitech Inc.'s funding was slowly drying up, and it couldn't find new sources in Mississippi. If the company stayed, it would wither away. The only option left for Ablitech, they decided, was for the fledgling company to move. "We called our shareholders together and said, 'Look, if we stay here, we're going to die,'" Malone recalled recently.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2011
In a conference room in downtown Baltimore, F. Blix Winston compared the Food and Drug Administration to a "slow-moving bulldog. " "You don't want to get bitten," Winston, an expert on the federal regulation of medical devices, told a crowd of about 50 entrepreneurs and academics recently. "You don't want to tangle with the FDA," he warned. "The FDA has the power to come in and padlock a company's doors. " Winston's presentation was part of a new approach by Maryland economic development officials to promote the state's life sciences industry.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
Baltimore's biotechnology industry has made strides. Two biotech parks by the Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland now anchor the east and west sides of the city. A few dozen biotech startups have made their home here. But Baltimore's nascent biotech industry doesn't yet have a breakout company — a darling of venture capitalists and Wall Street that has grown past the risky and unprofitable startup phase to achieve a steady stream of revenue and products in the pipeline.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2010
Fourteen Maryland biotechnology companies tapped nearly $6 million in new funding from investors who qualified for a state tax credit. The Biotechnology Investment Incentive Tax Credit is a state-mandated program that allows for a 50 percent tax break, up to $250,000, per investor in a qualified biotech company. To qualify, companies must be less than 12 years old, have headquarters in Maryland, employ fewer than 50 people and be state-certified as a biotechnology company. The tax credit is a central component of Gov. Martin O'Malley's BioMaryland 2020 plan, a 10-year, $1.3 billion strategy for growing the state's biotech industry.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Stephen Kiehl and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Stephen Kiehl,jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com and stephen.kiehl@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
A few months after General Motors made its last van at the 70-year-old Broening Highway plant, a seed for Maryland's new economy sprouted across town in West Baltimore. On a cold morning in October 2005, the governor and mayor heralded the opening of a biopark built by the University of Maryland, Baltimore - a place where researchers would pursue breakthroughs in treatments for diabetes, cancer and heart disease. One of the park's first tenants was a Japanese medical firm. Officials toasted the partnership with sake.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | June 20, 2008
Three days after Gov. Martin O'Malley announced a $1.1 billion initiative for the biotechnology industry, Comptroller Peter Franchot announced yesterday that he would advocate that the state pension fund to invest about $1 billion in life sciences and "green" technology such as renewable energy and environmentally sensitive building materials. Franchot, who is vice chairman of the Maryland State Retirement and Pension System, said he would recommend that about $500 million be invested in the biotechnology industry, particularly in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | October 11, 1991
Foreign investment in U.S. biotechnology firms is growing, and small biotech firms hobbled by scarce capital at home can turn to Europe and Asia for investment capital and help in other areas, experts told a conference of industry leaders yesterday in Baltimore."
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | September 9, 2007
It's hard to hear Drew Greenblatt over the steady - and deafening - ka-chink, ka-chunk of machines snipping steel wire at his factory in Southwest Baltimore. So he turns it up a notch. "That's for Baxter," he hollers, pointing to a giant box full of special-ordered wire baskets ready to be shipped to the drugmaker. Nearby, an employee welds wire for biotech bigwig Amgen Inc. as Greenblatt ticks off a Who's Who list of his other pharmaceutical customers: Pfizer, Roche, Novartis. It is a client roster that is nothing like the one he had when he bought the business - Marlin Steel Wire Products - in 1998 and focused on selling metal baskets to bagel shops for displaying their products.
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