Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBiotech
IN THE NEWS

Biotech

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 19, 2010
Gus G. Sentementes' July 11 article ("What Baltimore's biotech industry needs: an 'anchor'"), addressed some very important requirements for the growth of Baltimore's biotech industry. I agree that Baltimore needs and deserves to have an 'anchor' to help attract biotech companies. However, our goal cannot be how Baltimore can beat Montgomery County, or vice versa. The competition we need to be looking at in biotech is not Montgomery County versus Baltimore; it is our region versus others throughout the country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Former Johns Hopkins surgeon Dr. Ben Carson has been named chairman of the board of Frederick biotechnology company Vaccinogen Inc., which also announced Monday it received a commitment of up to $80 million from a Swedish investor. The company is readying for clinical trials of OncoVAX, a cancer treatment it has shown to prevent recurrence in colon cancer patients. An investor group known as The Investment Syndicate, led by Swedish entrepreneur Anders Halldin, invested $10 million in Vaccinogen and pledged $70 million more in four installments, contingent on the company hitting certain milestones.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 2, 2004
RECENT NEWS that Maryland slipped from third to fourth among the nation's biotechnology centers hit hard in a state well positioned to pin a lot of its hopes for economic growth on emerging high-tech industries. But that ranking, by the Ernst & Young accounting firm, was based on the number of biotech firms that have achieved their first round of financing, a measure on which North Carolina moved ahead in the last year. By perhaps more meaningful standards - total revenue, research spending and assets - Maryland remains solidly in third place, behind biotech's giants, San Francisco and Boston.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
More than 100 applicants are vying for $12 million worth of Maryland tax credits available to biotechnology investors in fiscal 2015, state economic development officials said. Applications for the Biotechnology Investment Incentive Tax Credit program were submitted online Tuesday to the state Department of Business and Economic Development. The program, first funded in fiscal 2007, has spurred investment of more than $120 million in 70 biotech firms, state officials said. Some Baltimore area companies that received investments last year include American Gene Technologies International, Animalgesic Laboratories, Cerecor Inc., Clear Guide Medical and Diagnostic Biochips.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Ken Malone and the board members of his startup biotech company gathered in a conference room at the University of Southern Mississippi last October to make a gut-wrenching decision. Ablitech Inc.'s funding was slowly drying up, and it couldn't find new sources in Mississippi. If the company stayed, it would wither away. The only option left for Ablitech, they decided, was for the fledgling company to move. "We called our shareholders together and said, 'Look, if we stay here, we're going to die,'" Malone recalled recently.
NEWS
June 19, 2002
BALTIMORE STANDS to cash in on the booming commercialization of biotech research with a privately run, $800 million biotech park near the Johns Hopkins medical campus. But even as plans for the proposed park progress, the Brookings Institution warns of the difficulties of achieving the dream. In a report released last week, the think tank identified the Washington-Baltimore region as one of only nine clusters in the nation that are having success with biotech commercialization. Unfortunately, research prowess is not enough in the risky world of biotech business.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Former Johns Hopkins surgeon Dr. Ben Carson has been named chairman of the board of Frederick biotechnology company Vaccinogen Inc., which also announced Monday it received a commitment of up to $80 million from a Swedish investor. The company is readying for clinical trials of OncoVAX, a cancer treatment it has shown to prevent recurrence in colon cancer patients. An investor group known as The Investment Syndicate, led by Swedish entrepreneur Anders Halldin, invested $10 million in Vaccinogen and pledged $70 million more in four installments, contingent on the company hitting certain milestones.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | November 11, 2009
Wearing a white lab coat and focused on handling instruments in a gleaming new classroom, Pauline Samuel couldn't be further away from the world of West Baltimore. Beyond this new lab where she intently studies biotechnology instrumentation techniques, Samuel works nights to support her five children. She still grieves for the two brothers she lost to Baltimore street violence in the past three years. Yet Samuel is also optimistic about her future. She's received financial aid from Baltimore City Community College and she's taking classes at its new Life Sciences Institute, a program based in the University of Maryland's biotechnology research park.
NEWS
April 17, 2002
THINK ABOUT the importance of this scene: Mayor Martin O'Malley, U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, Del. Hattie N. Harrison and Del. Clarence Davis standing together on a desolate East Baltimore lot, promising to work together to enable a sweeping renaissance in the area. They were smiling. They were hopeful. No need to pinch yourself; this was no dream. The bitter and defeatist political rivalries that have helped keep East Baltimore a slum may finally be waning. All the interested parties have now agreed on the ground rules for the development of Johns Hopkins Medical Center's planned biotech park.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | July 6, 1992
ChekTec Corp. has all the credentials of an up-and-coming biotechnology company: No products, no profits, fewer than 20 employees and a chief executive who answers the phone.But unlike many biotech companies that have lured investors with promises of dramatic new products and profits, ChekTec of Baltimore has kept most of its discoveries quiet until recently."If the company was a slick prospectus and a pile of press releases, I would have walked a long time ago," said Dr. Gary R. Pasternack, who with Dr. Francis P. "Frank" Kuhajda, is responsible for the cutting edge research that provides the company's foundation.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Baltimore biotech firm Alba Therapeutics said Monday that it has promoted its president to CEO. Wendy Perrow, who had also served as Alba's chief operating officer, has worked as an executive at the company since 2008. Her previous experience includes marketing positions at Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals and Merck. Alba, which is researching treatments for autoimmune disorders such as celiac disease, said Perrow is joining the company's board in addition to taking the CEO job. jhopkins@baltsun.com twitter.com/jsmithhopkins
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
When Osiris Therapeutics disclosed an agreement last week resolving concerns from federal regulators, the Columbia biotech firm pitched it as a win. The deal doesn't require changes to its marketing of Grafix bandages, Osiris said, and also gives it the opportunity to get a biologics license that could improve international prospects for the product. But some news stories — and at least one Wall Street analyst team — described the U.S. Food and Drug Administration agreement in entirely different terms.
NEWS
By Scott Eldridge | July 4, 2013
The Food and Drug Administration's plans to streamline the approval process for "breakthrough" drugs that treat life-threatening diseases is great news for patients and has enormous potential for our pharmaceutical industry, already in the midst of an innovation explosion. Unfortunately, in the middle of all this progress, political leaders in Washington are pushing proposals that would severely undermine innovation and deliver a crippling blow to Maryland's biotech industry. Lawmakers must understand that without a favorable policy environment, innovation can grind to a halt.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Early-stage Maryland biotechnology companies and investors must apply by Friday to be considered for the first-round of up to $10 million in state biotechnology investment tax credits, the state department of Business and Economic Development said Wednesday. Credits for fiscal year 2014 are available through the Maryland Biotechnology Investment Incentive Tax Credit program, which promotes private investment in biotechnology companies. Recipients get a refundable tax credit of 50 percent of a investment amounts of $25,000 to $500,000 per investor.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Hundreds of thousands of people die of malaria every year, most of them in Africa. Dr. Eddy C. Agbo wants people to get diagnosed quickly and easily - right in their homes - so they can seek treatment. The barrier to quick and easy diagnoses is that all available tests require blood. His Baltimore company is readying a version that uses urine - just like a pregnancy test. It should hit the market next year. Agbo, chief executive of Fyodor Biotechnologies, grew up in Nigeria and envisions the malaria test as the first in a line of products that could make an impact in developing countries.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
When Gail Folena-Wasserman joined Gaithersburg biotechnology startup MedImmune in 1991, she was its first employee in research and development, and dreamed of what the company might be "when it grew up. " Two decades later, the senior vice president for biopharmaceutical development is helping to test new drugs at a dramatically different MedImmune. Five years since a $15 billion acquisition by British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, the company is funneling a pipeline of potential therapies that has grown three times over and covers a wider spectrum of diseases.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
William A. Haseltine had a 55-acre, half-billion-dollar compound and a manufacturing plant built for his former biotech company, Human Genome Sciences, despite its having never brought a single product to market. With a facade made entirely of reflective glass, the six-story corporate headquarters juts into the sky almost invisibly. Inside, an atrium-style lobby has a lush garden and a 100-foot-long sculpture that depicts the birth of a protein. The floor is made of fossilized stone tile, and light filters through panels in the ceiling.
NEWS
By Andrew H. Segal | May 22, 2002
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - Building the proposed east-side biotechnology park may prove to be a watershed event in Baltimore's economic history. Biotech companies have the potential to generate high-quality jobs and create a strong local capital base. Further, they often graduate managers who go on to found successive companies, amplifying the benefit. Alarmingly, though, those involved with the project have articulated a Field of Dreams philosophy: "If you build it, they will come." They believe that once the real estate is developed, biotech companies will flock to East Baltimore in order to bask in the Johns Hopkins' intellectual glow.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
Baltimore BioWorks is John Powers's third biotech company — and the one that he says he's most excited about. The 56-year-old Ellicott City doctor built a career in biotechnology, working for the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health, and more recently as an entrepreneur and consultant. He already grew and sold two biotech companies in Maryland. He's a minority investor in his latest venture, Baltimore BioWorks, which is taking an unusual tack in the biotechnology sector.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
Columbia-based Osiris Therapeutics Inc., a biotechnology company developing stem cell-based treatments, beat Wall Street analysts' estimates with a reported loss of $4.3 million in the second quarter, which ended June 30. The firm, which earlier this year drew international headlines for having the world's first stem cell drug approved by a major country, posted a loss of 13 cents per share. Analysts polled by MarketWatch had expected a 15-cent-per-share loss. The company said its revenues from biosurgery products - which are used to improve wound healing and tissue regeneration - rose 43 percent, to $1.6 million, from the first quarter.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.