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Bioprocessing

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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
Maryland has lost its bid to bring an internationally known drug manufacturing company to Baltimore to operate a facility for small biotechnology companies.The directors of Bioprocessing Center Inc. said yesterday that they broke off negotiations with Celltech, a British company, after the company signed an agreement Friday with the state of New Hampshire.But the center's officers said yesterday that they have begun negotiations with two other companies that they believe are qualified to run the facility.
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BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 22, 2004
Tucked deep inside a College Park facility is a laboratory that has been quietly feeding the region's biotechnology future for two decades. The University of Maryland Bioprocessing Scale-Up Facility - or BSF - has transformed countless numbers of students into sought-after biotech recruits, trained hundreds of workers through customized workshops and helped scores of local companies understand the processes required to transform a concept into a product...
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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
A large German health care company is considering setting up shop in Baltimore to manage a manufacturing center for small biotechnology companies at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Campus.The board of the Maryland Bioprocessing Center said yesterday that it had entered into exclusive negotiations with Boehringer Mannheim International to operate the state-funded center, which is designed to help biotech companies bring lab discoveries to market.If enough business developed from the center, the company also would be interested in building a drug manufacturing plant next to the bioprocessing center in Baltimore, according to Dennert O. Ware, president of the biochemical products division of Boehringer in Indianapolis.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1995
When dignitaries get their first glimpse today of the nearly complete Maryland BioCenter, they will be seeing a facility that many hope will put the state at the forefront of an important new industry.It's hoped the first batches of some of the world's most important new biologically engineered vaccines and drugs will be made at the new center.But a big question looms:Can the $21 million state-of-the-art facility on Johns Hopkins' Bayview Research Campus draw enough business to be a success?
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
The Maryland Bioprocessing Center, designed to nurture small biotech companies, is negotiating with three companies, including a major German pharmaceutical company, that are interested in operating the center.Boehringer Mannheim, which has facilities in Indianapolis and Rockville, is one of the top choices for the job of running the facility, according to the center's chairwoman, Barbara Plantholt.In addition, Boehringer had been considering building a $50 million manufacturing center for biotechnology drugs in Indianapolis, but now is looking at several other sites, Ms. Plantholt said.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1994
Bioprocessing Center gets grantThe Maryland Bioprocessing Center Inc. and Baltimore officials were awarded a $1.5 million federal grant for the Maryland Bioprocessing Center, a manufacturing resource center to be built by fall 1995 on East Lombard Street, city officials said yesterday.The grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration will go toward construction of the $23 million project -- a two-story, 30,000-square-foot facility planned for five city-owned acres adjacent to Johns Hopkins Bayview Research Campus.
NEWS
March 7, 1992
The General Assembly next week takes up the matter of funding the Maryland Bioprocessing Center, a venture that could help cement the state's future as an international life sciences hub. It deserves a strong vote of confidence.In ordinary circumstances, the money would be virtually assured. Aimed at helping companies make the leap from laboratory to marketplace, the bioprocessing center meshes perfectly with Maryland's life sciences economic-development strategy. The Schaefer administration, business and academia are all on board.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
In a stunning setback for Maryland's plans to nurture home-grown biotechnology companies, a German company that was considered a sure bet to operate the planned Maryland Bioprocessing Center has abruptly backed out.The German company, Boehringer Mannheim, a multinational pharmaceutical firm with annual sales estimated at $5 billion, pulled out of the proposed deal earlier this month after five months during which it was the sole company negotiating with...
NEWS
July 15, 1991
How serious is Maryland about pursuing its goal of becoming a center for biotechnology and the new life sciences technologies of the 21st century?The Schaefer administration is totally committed. So are other government officials, businessmen and academic leaders in the Baltimore and Washington regions. But the General Assembly? It seems to be having trouble making up its mind whether any money should be spent on such scientific ventures.Take the Maryland Bioprocessing Center, a groundbreaking enterprise that holds enormous potential for turning this region into a hotbed of scientific development.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 5, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- A House subcommittee balked this week at releasing $1.5 million in funds to design a facility to help small biotechnology companies move their products from the laboratory to the factory floor.Despite the support of legislative analysts, a subcommittee of the House Appropriations Committee decided Wednesday that there are still too many unanswered questions about the proposed $23 million Maryland Bioprocessing Center for the panel to make available the money that the General Assembly tentatively allocated for it.But subcommittee Chairman Howard P. Rawlings, D-Baltimore, suggested that if the project's backers can come up with some answers within two weeks, when a Senate panel will meet to debate the funding, the money probably will be released.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Gov. Parris N. Glendening is expected to announce today a $1 million annual program to offer incentives to small biotechnology companies that promise to build manufacturing facilities in Maryland when they have products that are ready to market.The Manufacturing Incentive Program is to be detailed at a ceremony today to mark the "topping off" of the $21.5 million BioCenter, a state-backed facility in East Baltimore that research and development-stage companies will use to make samples of the drugs they are developing.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Department of Economic and Employment DevelopmentSun Staff Writer | April 8, 1995
The state's half-billion dollar investment in biotechnology has been slow to pay off in jobs, a new University of Baltimore study says, but the report's lead author says Maryland should stick with its strategy of investing in a sector that could form a cornerstone of its 21st-century economy."
BUSINESS
August 26, 1994
Bioprocessing Center gets grantThe Maryland Bioprocessing Center Inc. and Baltimore officials were awarded a $1.5 million federal grant for the Maryland Bioprocessing Center, a manufacturing resource center to be built by fall 1995 on East Lombard Street, city officials said yesterday.The grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce Economic Development Administration will go toward construction of the $23 million project -- a two-story, 30,000-square-foot facility planned for five city-owned acres adjacent to Johns Hopkins Bayview Research Campus.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
The state yesterday named a Beltsville entrepreneur that it had rejected in March to build and run the $20 million centerpiece of Maryland's drive to become a world biotechnology center.The announcement appeared to end a frustrating two-year search in which several U.S. drug companies declined to negotiate for the job and a foreign drug company backed out after having held exclusive negotiating rights for five months.The frustrations have repeatedly delayed the opening of the Maryland Bioprocessing Center, a production site that is critical to the state's economic-growth strategy for this decade and the early 21st century.
NEWS
July 25, 1993
Rita R. Colwell's decision not to seek the presidency of a large Alabama university is impressive testimony to the impact she believes the Columbus Center will have on the international scientific community. Few ambitious academics with a flair for administration could turn down a university presidency, least of all for a small research institution that is still two years from coming into its own. The Center of Marine Biotechnology, one of six research and teaching units that make up Dr. Colwell's Maryland Biotechnology Institute, will be the centerpiece of the $160 million complex that bids to become the latest jewel in the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
In a stunning setback for Maryland's plans to nurture home-grown biotechnology companies, a German company that was considered a sure bet to operate the planned Maryland Bioprocessing Center has abruptly backed out.The German company, Boehringer Mannheim, a multinational pharmaceutical firm with annual sales estimated at $5 billion, pulled out of the proposed deal earlier this month after five months during which it was the sole company negotiating with...
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | February 14, 1992
A $21 million center designed to help Maryland's baby biotechnology companies grow into healthy teen-agers will be situated on five acres of city-owned land at the Johns Hopkins University's Bayview Campus in Baltimore, the center's board said yesterday.Billed as a boost for economic development, the center will try to nurture companies that are trying to turn laboratory creations into commercial products. The center will rent space and will provide the expertise of Hopkins scientists and University of Maryland Baltimore County bioengineers.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1995
When dignitaries get their first glimpse today of the nearly complete Maryland BioCenter, they will be seeing a facility that many hope will put the state at the forefront of an important new industry.It's hoped the first batches of some of the world's most important new biologically engineered vaccines and drugs will be made at the new center.But a big question looms:Can the $21 million state-of-the-art facility on Johns Hopkins' Bayview Research Campus draw enough business to be a success?
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | June 1, 1993
Talks look promising for biotech centerIt appears that a big local bet is close to paying off.In March, the board of the Maryland Bioprocessing Center rejected a local company's proposal to operate the center, a manufacturing plant designed for small biotech companies. Instead, the board entered into exclusive negotiations with Boehringer Mannheim International, a large German pharmaceutical company that was interested in operating the facility.The risk was that the board would spend months and months negotiating with the company without reaching an agreement.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
A large German health care company is considering setting up shop in Baltimore to manage a manufacturing center for small biotechnology companies at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Campus.The board of the Maryland Bioprocessing Center said yesterday that it had entered into exclusive negotiations with Boehringer Mannheim International to operate the state-funded center, which is designed to help biotech companies bring lab discoveries to market.If enough business developed from the center, the company also would be interested in building a drug manufacturing plant next to the bioprocessing center in Baltimore, according to Dennert O. Ware, president of the biochemical products division of Boehringer in Indianapolis.
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