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NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | February 26, 1993
THERE is no dispute that America leads the world in biomedical research. As President Clinton tries to restructure an economy built on 19th- and 20th-century products to meet the demands of the next century, American pre-eminence in biomedicine holds out the best hope of serving as the engine capable of driving that economy.That is why every American ought be deeply concerned about the cancer that is quietly weakening the foundations of biomedical research -- conflict of interest. Recent events at the University of Minnesota's medical school illustrate just how serious the problem of conflict of interest has become and just how ineptly government, universities and legislators are dealing with it.On Feb. 18, University of Minnesota President Nils Hasslemo asked for and received the resignation of Dr. John Najarian as the chairman of the department of surgery.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Henrietta Lacks had no control when doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital used her cells 62 years ago in research that led to groundbreaking medical advances. But now her descendants will. The National Institutes of Health said Wednesday that it had reached an agreement with Lacks' family that requires scientists to get permission from the government agency to use her genome, or genetic blueprint. It was derived from cells taken from the 31-year-old from Turners Station after she died from an aggressive form of cervical cancer in 1951.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 18, 1994
BETHESDA -- Hillary Rodham Clinton pledged yesterday to increase White House support for basic biomedical research, saying that the work of medical scientists goes hand in hand with health care reform.The benefits of medical research could be spread to a greater number of Americans through reforms in the health care system, Mrs. Clinton said in a speech to researchers at the National Institutes of Health."Health security not only means guaranteeing comprehensive benefits throughout a person's life; it also means emphasizing early diagnosis and prevention of diseases," she said.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2013
Scientists at the nation's leading research institutions are warning that continued uncertainty over federal funding could lead to a brain drain that will undermine the country's global status in medicine. With funding at the National Institutes of Health stagnant since 2003 and other countries increasing research spending, some scientists have chosen to work overseas rather than endure what they expect will be a years-long wait for the grants they need to launch their careers in the United States.
NEWS
By Kory Dodd and Kory Dodd,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 20, 2003
Nearly five months after receiving a $10 million grant, Morgan State University has forged ahead with plans for an interdisciplinary center focusing on biomedical research that officials say will establish the university's place in that field. The center will "bring attention to Morgan ... [and] it will really be able to attract a better quality of graduate students," said Annie Williams, program manager for the Morgan State University Biomedical Research Center. The grant, from the National Institutes of Health National Center for Research Resources, will fund three laboratories and nine research projects and provide scholarships for three students during the next five years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 8, 1998
BETHESDA -- The National Institutes of Health used to feel like a bucolic college campus. Now it is a giant construction project, with cranes and bulldozers erecting new laboratories, a new research hospital and a new center for vaccine research.The activity here is the tangible symbol of a huge new federal investment in biomedical research. Congress is providing far more money than President Clinton requested because congressional leaders of both parties have vowed to double the agency's budget over five years -- a process that began with the 1999 appropriations bill, which just became law.The institutes have always enjoyed respect on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 3, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In his new budget, President Clinton plans to seek a substantial increase in federal spending on biomedical research, and members of Congress from both parties say they are virtually certain to approve an even bigger increase.Science and politics point to the same conclusion. When Congress reconvenes this month, lawmakers will be seeking more money for the National Institutes of Health because they believe that researchers can exploit promising scientific opportunities such as advances in cancer treatment.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
Researchers : Jacques Ravel, associate director for genomics, University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Genome Sciences, and Eric Wommack, a University of Delaware professor Project : Ravel and Wommack are launching Microbiome, a new research journal. BioMed Central, an online publisher of peer-reviewed articles in medical research, is publishing the journal. It will focus on research exploring microorganisms' natural environment, known as a microbiome, which can include the human body or any other environmental habitat.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1992
The propaganda war over the use of animals in biomedical research has shifted to an improbable battleground -- the august pages of the 224-year-old Encyclopaedia Britannica and, specifically, the latest entry under the heading "Dogs."There, buried in the usual boilerplate -- descendant of wolves, etc. -- the Britannica's dog expert has included what biomedical researchers describe as a little anti-vivisection agitprop."Another common use of dogs, especially purpose-bred beagles, is in biomedical research," part of the offending entry reads.
NEWS
By Janny Scott and Janny Scott,Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1992
The grueling propaganda war over the use of animals in biomedical research has shifted to an improbable battleground -- the august pages of the 224-year-old Encyclopaedia Britannica and, specifically, the latest entry under the heading "Dogs."There, buried in the usual boilerplate -- descendant of wolves, impressive olfaction, et cetera -- the Britannica's anointed dog expert has seen fit to include what biomedical researchers, in high dudgeon, describe as a little anti-vivisection agitprop.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2012
Researchers : Jacques Ravel, associate director for genomics, University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Genome Sciences, and Eric Wommack, a University of Delaware professor Project : Ravel and Wommack are launching Microbiome, a new research journal. BioMed Central, an online publisher of peer-reviewed articles in medical research, is publishing the journal. It will focus on research exploring microorganisms' natural environment, known as a microbiome, which can include the human body or any other environmental habitat.
NEWS
June 12, 2012
I note with admiration and respect the substantial philanthropic commitments of both Under Armour founder Kevin Plank and Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti to Baltimore City's schools, and to the Baltimore region generally. However, I find The Sun's recognition of their significant corporate citizenship to the region ("Protecting Baltimore's house," June 11) strangely out of sync with past statements about the irrelevance of losing other corporate headquarters. Specifically, on these same pages, The Sun considered whether the loss of Constellation Energy, our last Fortune 500 company, had any relevance ("America's branch town," March 18)
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2008
The University of Maryland yesterday joined a growing chorus of research institutions warning lawmakers that static federal funding for science has slowed biomedical research and threatens the careers of young scientists. In a briefing at the University of Maryland Medical Center, UM officials told Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski that declining funding for the National Institutes of Health is forcing scientists to shy away from pioneering research. They noted that younger, research-bound scientists and doctors rely on NIH funding to launch their careers but are finding it increasingly difficult to obtain their first grants.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | April 27, 2007
A pioneering Johns Hopkins neuroscientist has won the country's most lucrative biomedical research prize for work on cellular communication that helped revolutionize drug development. Dr. Solomon H. Snyder, who founded Johns Hopkins School of Medicine's neuroscience department, was one of three scientists awarded the Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. The researchers, who all made groundbreaking discoveries on how cells communicate with their environment through molecular receptors, will split the $500,000 prize.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun staff | February 11, 2007
Forbidden to talk, Rebecca Fuller nervously took notes as other scientists analyzed her failure to win $275,000 in funding for promising Parkinson's disease research. Laundette Jones, her primary critic on the panel, blamed a lack of clarity in the request Fuller had sent to the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda. "I was looking for the punch line," Jones said, leafing through the grant proposal for effect. "What impact is [the research] going to make? I think I found it -- but not until page 39."
NEWS
January 16, 2007
NIH center meets design standards I want to clarify several points raised in The Sun's article about vibration issues at the National Institutes of Health's new Biomedical Research Center ("NIH may use labs at old building," Jan. 7). First, the building meets the design standards for conducting biomedical research, and its structure is similar to other research buildings that have been recently constructed, such as those at Yale University, the University of Michigan and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN REPORTER | January 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The National Institutes of Health says it is considering "extensive" renovations to an aging research laboratory in Southeast Baltimore because the new $250 million lab built nearby as a replacement vibrates so much that tests there could be compromised. NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni acknowledged the severity of the vibration problems at the new Biomedical Research Center in a recent letter to Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, who had inquired about the troubled project after reading an article in The Sun. The newspaper reported in October that portions of the building could not be used as intended because of excessive vibrations.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski asked the National Institutes of Health to explain how much of the medical research planned for its new $250 million building in Southeast Baltimore will have to be moved elsewhere because of the vibrations creating problems at the government lab. Scientists at the federal research agency were supposed to have relocated to the building this fall but are awaiting word whether they can make the move or...
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN REPORTER | January 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The National Institutes of Health says it is considering "extensive" renovations to an aging research laboratory in Southeast Baltimore because the new $250 million lab built nearby as a replacement vibrates so much that tests there could be compromised. NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni acknowledged the severity of the vibration problems at the new Biomedical Research Center in a recent letter to Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, who had inquired about the troubled project after reading an article in The Sun. The newspaper reported in October that portions of the building could not be used as intended because of excessive vibrations.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN REPORTER | November 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski asked the National Institutes of Health to explain how much of the medical research planned for its new $250 million building in Southeast Baltimore will have to be moved elsewhere because of the vibrations creating problems at the government lab. Scientists at the federal research agency were supposed to have relocated to the building this fall but are awaiting word whether they can make the move or...
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