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By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | November 4, 2001
Architecture at the Johns Hopkins University is like Baltimore's weather: If you don't like what you see, wait a while and it will change. Last spring, Hopkins dignitaries gathered on the Homewood campus for the opening of Mattin Center, an arts complex in the vanguard of architectural design. This fall, they celebrated the completion of Clark Hall, a teaching and research building that looks as if it could have been built in the 1800s. Both are attractive structures, with their own strengths.
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October 6, 2011
Ryan Michael Sullivan, of Owings Mills, graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in management from Clemson University, S.C. Aug. 13. Churchill Davenport Jr, of Owings Mills, majoring in environmental science at Davis & Elkins College in Elkins, W.Va, was named to the spring 2011 dean's list. He is the son of Churchill Davenport and Laurie Fader. David A. Narrow, of Owings Mills, a junior majoring in biomedical engineering at the University of Rochester, has been named to the dean's list for the spring 2011 semester.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
The Johns Hopkins University will use a $17 million grant to build and operate a facility dedicated to the growing field of biomedical engineering.The building, planned for the Homewood campus, will be part of Hopkins' Whiting School of Engineering, where biomedical engineering is one of the most popular areas of study among undergraduates.The grant comes from the Whitaker Foundation, a Rosslyn, Va.-based group that has made support of biomedical engineering its specialty."This grant will allow us to move forward into areas of biomedical engineering research that the National Institutes of Health has identified as the high-priority areas for the 21st century," said Murray Sachs, chairman of Hopkins' biomedical engineering department who will head the new Biomedical Engineering Institute.
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September 24, 2011
Carroll Hospital Center Foundation recently presented scholarships to five local students to help assist them in pursuing their college education. Libman Nursing Scholarships were awarded to Brittany Harman, 25, of Woodbine; Denise Maurice, 46, of Westminster; and Ricky Teuscher, 26, of Manchester. Each received $2,000 for tuition, books and fees at Carroll Community College for their pursuit of a degree as a registered nurse. The scholarship was established in 2003 by Frank Herbert Libman.
NEWS
October 4, 1994
Dr. Calvin Robinson Dyer has joined the orthopedic department of the Columbia Medical Plan at the HMO's Columbia location. After graduating from Johns Hopkins University with a degree in biomedical engineering, Dr. Dyer received his medical degree from Vanderbilt University in 1988.He completed his residency at the University of California in 1993.Before joining Columbia Medical Plan, Dr. Dyer completed a sports medicine and arthroscopy fellowship in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
June 27, 2005
On May 12, 2005, Dr. KEN JOHNSON, Director of The Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, and Professor of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, at Johns Hopkins University. Thursday, June 30, 4:00 pm, a memorial service to honor Ken Johnson, will be held in The Glass Pavilion, Homewood Campus, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St, Baltimore. Inquiries to: 410-516-8640 (or see www.mb.jhu.edu)
NEWS
By Daniel S. Greenberg | October 8, 1996
THE GILDED WORLD of big-league philanthropy is currently witnessing an extraordinary event: the voluntary extinction of a rich foundation that is going out of business in a torrent of grants rather than opt for limited spending, assured perpetuity and cushy staff jobs.The planned departure raises the rarely discussed question of whether society benefits from immortality for the hundreds of foundations in the multi-billion-dollar non-profit, tax-exempt sector.On a decade-long countdown to oblivion is the Whitaker Foundation of Roslyn, Va., whose $364 million endowment placed it 64th among American foundations in 1994.
NEWS
March 22, 1993
Name:Jeremy Jason Funk, 17, of Stoney Beach.School: Northeast Senior High School.Accomplishments/Interests:Jeremy maintains a 3.6 grade point average.He is treasurer of both the National Honor Society and the senior class, vice president of the Drama Club, and a member of the varsity wrestling, cross country and track teams.As a member of the All-County Chorus, Jeremy enjoys singing and participates in both the adult and youth choirs of the Lake Shore Baptist Church.He especially enjoys when the church choir entertains residents of local nursing and retirement homes.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
Kenneth Olafur Johnson, a leading Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist whose research helped illuminate the interrelationship between the human hand and the brain, died of complications from colon cancer Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 66. Dr. Johnson, who lived in Baltimore near the Homewood campus, was a professor of neuroscience and biomedical engineering, as well as director of the university's Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, which studies the neural mechanisms of higher brain functions.
FEATURES
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | November 3, 2009
The Johns Hopkins University passed itself off as Harvard in a movie Monday without feeling the least bit flattered. "It feels degrading somehow," said Diego Ardila, 19, as he watched workers remove the words "Latrobe Hall" from a stately brick building and replace them with "Kirkland House." Hopkins' Homewood campus is standing in for Harvard in "The Social Network," a movie about the creation of Facebook by Harvard student Mark Zuckerberg. The movie, like some Hopkins students, couldn't get into Harvard, which has a longstanding policy against commercial filming on campus.
FEATURES
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | November 3, 2009
The Johns Hopkins University passed itself off as Harvard in a movie Monday without feeling the least bit flattered. "It feels degrading somehow," said Diego Ardila, 19, as he watched workers remove the words "Latrobe Hall" from a stately brick building and replace them with "Kirkland House." Hopkins' Homewood campus is standing in for Harvard in "The Social Network," a movie about the creation of Facebook by Harvard student Mark Zuckerberg. The movie, like some Hopkins students, couldn't get into Harvard, which has a longstanding policy against commercial filming on campus.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | February 7, 2009
Sitting there in a black cocktail dress, pearls and high heels, her chestnut hair cascading around her shoulders, Sarah Hemminger is an attractive yet curious figure. Listening to her speak to a prominent group of city leaders, it's hard to believe that this woman with the Hoosier smile is all that she says she is - doctoral candidate in biomedical engineering, founder of a nonprofit mentoring program, den mother to 31 of Baltimore's most challenged teens. But she is all that, and at 28, her accomplishments should impress any astute CEO, strategic community organizer and impassioned do-gooder.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel | April 13, 2008
Mallory Vogel is a three-year varsity player and one of three captains on the C. Milton Wright girls lacrosse team. She also has played varsity soccer and basketball for three yearsBut sports is not the only thing in her life. She loves math and science and plans on studying biomedical engineering -- which can involve work such as designing limbs and tissues and ligaments -- in college, probably at Catholic or RPI, while playing basketball and lacrosse. Vogel has a 4.1 grade point average, is a member of the National Honor Society and tutors students in algebra and geometry.
NEWS
By GLENN GRAHAM | May 30, 2007
Sports have always been important to Mount Hebron senior Lisa Alban, who closed out a four-year varsity career as a pitcher on the Vikings softball team. While growing up, she played softball, volleyball, basketball, lacrosse and baseball in the Howard County Youth Program. Alban's involvement with HCYP doesn't stop there. Since her freshman year, she has been the only female umpire in the program's youth baseball league, and she is a camp counselor during the summer. For her dedication to the program, she received this year's Christopher Kelly Memorial Scholarship.
NEWS
By KATHERINE DUNN | October 25, 2006
A senior at Poly, Keene is a multi-dimensional player for the Engineers' No. 14 volleyball team. A veteran of the Starlings Volleyball Club, she is excellent at back-row defense but is also an offensive threat thanks to a big vertical leap and a powerful arm. Keene has a 3.7 grade point average and participates in the WORTHY (Worthwhile To Help High School Youth) Program, in which she learns about various engineering fields at Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems. She also plays softball and runs indoor track.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
For most undergraduates, plastic cable ties are things they use to subdue the tangle of computer wires behind their desks. But for 11 budding engineers at the Johns Hopkins University, the simple, sturdy fasteners were the key to solving a problem that has vexed cardiac surgeons for decades - how to do a better repair on a breastbone they saw in half to gain access to the heart. The undergraduates in associate research professor Robert Allen's two-semester, biomedical engineering design course have conceived and built a hand-held device that can safely join and stabilize the two halves of the sternum, using cable ties that dissolve after the bone has healed.
NEWS
By GLENN GRAHAM | May 30, 2007
Sports have always been important to Mount Hebron senior Lisa Alban, who closed out a four-year varsity career as a pitcher on the Vikings softball team. While growing up, she played softball, volleyball, basketball, lacrosse and baseball in the Howard County Youth Program. Alban's involvement with HCYP doesn't stop there. Since her freshman year, she has been the only female umpire in the program's youth baseball league, and she is a camp counselor during the summer. For her dedication to the program, she received this year's Christopher Kelly Memorial Scholarship.
NEWS
June 29, 2001
Ann Arrundell County Historical Society will hold its annual crab feast from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. July 8 at Kurtz's Beach in Pasadena. The event will feature door prizes, a raffle, musical entertainment and a menu of steamed crabs, crab soup, pit beef and ham, salads, beer, cake and soda. The cost is $35 for adults, $10 for children ages 6-11 and free for those younger than age 6. Tickets are available at the society's Browse and Buy Shoppes at Jones Station Road in Severna Park and Benson-Hammond House in Linthicum.
NEWS
June 27, 2005
On May 12, 2005, Dr. KEN JOHNSON, Director of The Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, and Professor of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, at Johns Hopkins University. Thursday, June 30, 4:00 pm, a memorial service to honor Ken Johnson, will be held in The Glass Pavilion, Homewood Campus, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St, Baltimore. Inquiries to: 410-516-8640 (or see www.mb.jhu.edu)
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2005
Kenneth Olafur Johnson, a leading Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist whose research helped illuminate the interrelationship between the human hand and the brain, died of complications from colon cancer Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 66. Dr. Johnson, who lived in Baltimore near the Homewood campus, was a professor of neuroscience and biomedical engineering, as well as director of the university's Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, which studies the neural mechanisms of higher brain functions.
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