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Marta H. Mossburg | April 24, 2012
We live in fascinating times. On the one hand, it is OK to detail the most intimate aspects of a woman's reproductive health in congressional testimony and to demand "free" birth control pills from employers and/or the government. It is also OK to label those who object to such public displays of personal choice and state-sponsored free love as leading a "war on women. " On the other hand, it is also OK for those who hew to the same ideology as that above to condemn a woman who chooses to raise her children for a living as someone who "never worked a day in her life.
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NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Ari'Yonna Vrathwaite thought she would be a music producer when she grew up, until she started attending a program at the National Aquarium this week. Now, the program that gets students involved in research about the Chesapeake Bay watershed has given Ari'Yonna something to think about: marine biology as a career. "I really like it and I want to come back here again," she said. "We have fun. " Ari'Yonna, 13 and a rising eighth-grader at Commodore John Rogers School in Baltimore, said that so far she liked testing the oxygen level in the water the most.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
Johns Hopkins University adjunct biology professor Donald Brown has won the 2012 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science for his work in genetics, as well as mentoring young scientists. He is the sixth Hopkins faculty member to win the prestigious award for basic and clinical research. Brown, who also is director emeritus of the Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Embryology, was recognized for work he and others did in gene amplification, one process that is responsible for runaway growth of chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Philip Joseph DiPaula, a retired Forest Park and Polytechnic Institute science teacher who received two Purple Hearts during World War II, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Saturday at St. Agnes Hospital. The Edmondson Heights resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised on Piedmont Avenue, he was the son of Antonio DiPaula, who owned a North Avenue confectionery and fruit store, and Vincenzina Restivo DiPaula, a homemaker. He was a 1942 graduate of Forest Park High School.
HEALTH
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Not all addictions live up to their advance press. In the past decade, it's become common to casually and humorously describe a favorite activity in the parlance of chemical dependency. People speak of being "addicted" to chocolate or high-fat foods, playing video games, buying expensive designer shoes, watching weekly episodes of "American Idol" to sleeping on high-thread-count sheets. But according to "The Compass of Pleasure," a new book by Johns Hopkins neuroscientist David Linden that is being released today by The Viking Press, just two of those pursuits -- eating fatty foods and shopping -- can become genuine addictions for some people.
NEWS
September 23, 2003
H. Elizabeth Cully, a retired biology lab assistant for Baltimore County public schools, died of a stroke Sept. 16 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Towson resident was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised on St. Paul Street, H. Elizabeth Herrlich was a 1934 graduate of Eastern High School and earned her bachelor's degree from Goucher College. She became a social worker with the city's former Department of Public Welfare, and worked for the post office during World War II. In 1962, she became a biology lab assistant -- first at Western High School in the city and later at Ridgely Junior High and Dulaney High School in the county.
NEWS
November 26, 2002
Richard Leavitt Hilton Jr., who taught biology for 30 years at Towson University, died of a heart attack Sunday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 69 and lived in Towson. Dr. Hilton was born in Fall River, Mass., and raised in Manchester, Conn., and Providence, R.I. He earned his bachelor's degree in 1958 and a master's degree in botany in 1960 from the University of Connecticut at Storrs. In 1968, he earned his doctorate in phycology from the University of Arizona. Dr. Hilton joined the faculty of what was then Towson State College in 1972, and remained as a professor of biology until his death.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | September 27, 2006
Dr. Carl S. Weber, who had been a founding faculty member at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and taught biological sciences there for nearly four decades, died of lymphoma Sept. 20 at his Odenton home. He was 70. Dr. Weber was born in Hartford, Conn., the son of German immigrants, and raised in Milford, Conn., and Dallas. A musical prodigy, he was sent at age 13 to study at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music. He earned a bachelor's degree in music from Southern Methodist University in 1957.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2000
This isn't the way Nathan Amoth expected to approach biology. "It's one of the only classes that I have that actually makes you think instead of going, sitting, listening, maybe doing some busywork and going home," said the 14-year-old freshman at Broadneck High School in Annapolis. "It's like my hardest class in the whole day." On a recent morning, Amoth and his classmates were studying the salinity of the Chesapeake Bay, which varies with time of year and proximity to the ocean. Teacher Randy Stevens asked them to predict salty water's effect on various organisms: rockfish, oysters, bay grasses.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | November 5, 2008
Maryland's high school seniors are having more difficulty passing their biology and English exams than tests in the other two subjects, according to data released recently by the Maryland State Department of Education. Statewide statistics released at the state board meeting last week showed that, overall, 83 percent of students in the Class of 2009 had passed all the High School Assessments required to receive a high school diploma. Special education students and those who are learning English as a second language were struggling the most.
EXPLORE
September 23, 2013
WASHINGTON COLLEGE: Washington College in Chestertown has announced its dean's list for the spring 2013 semester. Dean's List students are recognized for their academic excellence and have achieved a grade point average of 3.5 or higher for the semester. Students include Courtney Agar of Bel Air, Class of 2015 business management major and psychology minor; Christopher Brown of Havre de Grace, Class of 2013 humanities major and Hispanic studies minor; Lillian Burril of Havre de Grace, Class of 2016 sociology major; James Comotto of Abingdon, Class of 2013 biology major and philosophy minor; Stephanie Davey of Abingdon, Class of 2015 Hispanic studies major; Emily Eline of Jarrettsville, Class of 2016; Gary Fenstamaker of Belcamp, Class of 2013 computer science and art major and mathematics minor; Laura Gettier of Forest Hill, Class of 2016; Laurel Jones of Forest Hill, Class of 2016 chemistry major; Zachary Leppert of Belcamp, Class of 2014 psychology major; Meredith O'Connell of Bel Air, Class of 2014 English major and creative writing minor; Suzanne Patinella of Fallston, Class of 2015 business management major; Matthew Ridge of Jarrettsville, Class of 2015 drama major; Alexandra Roemer of Pylesville, Class of 2015 biology major; Brooke Sanchez of Bel Air, Class of 2016 psychology major; Ceara Scanlon of Abingdon, Class of 2016 psychology major; Gabrielle Tarbert of Bel Air, Class of 2013 political science major; and Jillian Undem of Bel Air, Class of 2014 human development...
NEWS
By René J. Muller | June 18, 2013
Days before the official May 22 publication date of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-5), a number of psychiatrists who were closely associated with the project scrambled to do some preemptory damage control, mostly by lowering the expectations for what was to come. Michael B. First, professor of psychiatry at Columbia, acknowledged on NPR that there was still no empirical method to confirm or rule out any mental illness. "We were hoping and imagining that research would advance at a pace that laboratory tests would have come out. And here we are 20 years later and we still unfortunately rely primarily on symptoms to make our diagnoses.
NEWS
By Abby Bernstein | May 22, 2013
In 1988, I became extremely ill. I had many tests, saw many doctors and was given various medicines. Some caused allergic reactions. Through it all, I remained sick — and actually became worse. Eventually, I was diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis, a very rare disorder. Much of the information I read said I had about 10 years to live. Making matters worse, I was soon diagnosed with another autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). My treatment options for RA were severely limited because of my autoimmune hepatitis, as most of the RA drugs would filter through the liver and could initiate another attack.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2012
Howard H. Seliger, a retired Johns Hopkins University biology professor who fulfilled a childhood fascination with fireflies by later investigating the science behind their light-making properties, died of coronary artery disease Dec. 20 at his Mount Washington home. He was 88. Family members said that he was an expert on bioluminescence. He helped to show that fireflies and microorganisms found in bioluminescent bodies of water have enzymes that trigger a chemical reaction that make them light up. Dr. Seliger was also principal scientist at the Chesapeake Bay Institute from 1972 to 1989.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2012
It has been a fallow interval at the blog because of some hectic days at the paragraph factory, domestic exigencies, and the like, but I am back today to advocate, in my small way, sanity. Immediately after the late election, the outbreaks of looniness came thick and fast. A gentleman wrote to The Baltimore Sun to say that he was halting all charitable donations and putting his resources into bottled water and ammo, presumably against the collapse of civil order that President Obama's re-election made inevitable.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
Johns Hopkins University adjunct biology professor Donald Brown has won the 2012 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science for his work in genetics, as well as mentoring young scientists. He is the sixth Hopkins faculty member to win the prestigious award for basic and clinical research. Brown, who also is director emeritus of the Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Embryology, was recognized for work he and others did in gene amplification, one process that is responsible for runaway growth of chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Pamela Furness Engel, an Anne Arundel County biology teacher and teaching adviser, died of pancreatic cancer May 16 at Baltimore-Washington Medical Center. She was 58 and lived in Linthicum. Born Pamela Furness in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville and Columbia, she was a 1971 Atholton High School graduate. She earned a degree in biology at what is now McDaniel College and had a second degree in education at the Notre Dame of Maryland University, as well as a master's degree in biology from Towson University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 2, 2011
Guy Thomas Germana Jr., a retired Woodlawn High School educator, died Sunday of a heart attack at his Millersville home. He was 81. Mr. Germana was born and raised in Atlantic City, N.J., where he graduated from public schools. He served in the Navy for two years in the early 1950s and earned a bachelor's degree from Bloomsburg State College in Bloomsburg, Pa., which he attended on a football scholarship. Mr. Germana, who taught biology for more than 20 years at Woodlawn High School, also taught the school's first honors program in entomology.
HEALTH
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2012
The space sure looked like a science lab, with beakers full of brightly-hued potions and a dry-erase board covered in graphs and mathematical scrawl. But at the heart of the operation sits a hunk of metal with a hand crank on the side. "It's a pasta maker," said Barry Margulies, a biology professor who presides over the Towson University lab. No joke. When it occurred to Margulies' graduate researcher that Williams Sonoma might have the answer to their prayers, it was a major breakthrough for the lab's efforts to treat one of America's most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Ann M. Klingaman, a retired Baltimore County public school educator whose career spanned more than three decades, died Sunday of complications from a broken hip at Gilchrist Hospice in Columbia. The former longtime Catonsville resident was 88. The daughter of a West Baltimore pharmacist and a homemaker, Ann Rebecca Meeth was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. She was a 1940 graduate of Catonsville High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1944 from what was then Western Maryland College.
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