Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBiologist
IN THE NEWS

Biologist

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Philip Filner, a retired molecular biologist and community activist who helped preserve a wooded and wetland tract in Owings Mills, died of pancreatic cancer Sept. 6 at his Lutherville home. He was 75. Born in Philadelphia, he was the son of Samuel Filner, an artist and illustrator, and Lily Cohen Filner, a homemaker. He was raised in Queens, N.Y., and was a 1956 graduate of Stuyvesant High School. As a young man, he delivered meats for a kosher butcher and worked as a city parks recreation worker and a darkroom assistant for a photographer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Philip Filner, a retired molecular biologist and community activist who helped preserve a wooded and wetland tract in Owings Mills, died of pancreatic cancer Sept. 6 at his Lutherville home. He was 75. Born in Philadelphia, he was the son of Samuel Filner, an artist and illustrator, and Lily Cohen Filner, a homemaker. He was raised in Queens, N.Y., and was a 1956 graduate of Stuyvesant High School. As a young man, he delivered meats for a kosher butcher and worked as a city parks recreation worker and a darkroom assistant for a photographer.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 4, 2005
Elizabeth R. Garrett, a homemaker and former teacher and biologist, died of a stroke Saturday at the Charlestown Retirement Community, where she had lived for the past 12 years. The former Catonsville resident was 90. Born Elizabeth O. Rausch, she was raised in West Baltimore. She was a 1932 graduate of Western High School and earned a bachelor's degree from Goucher College. Mrs. Garrett worked in the 1930s and 1940s as a biologist and did cancer research at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was later a teacher for the Baltimore County school system, instructing homebound children who had long-term illnesses.
FEATURES
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Biologists from Maryland's Department of Natural Resources got to hold some cute bear cubs Monday. But it was more than just an opportunity to see the state's wildlife up close. DNR's Wildlife and Heritage Service used the winter check-up to "keep an eye on the size and health of Maryland's bruin population," said DNR spokeswoman Candus Thomson . Staff ventured into the woods Monday, while sows and bears were still located in their dens, Thomson said. The exercise allowed biologists "to change the batteries in radio collars worn by some sows and tag the new cubs with microchips, so they can be scanned in subsequent years without disturbing their hibernation.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 2, 1996
A marine biologist for the National Aquarium in Baltimore searched Rock Creek in northern Anne Arundel County and parts of the Patapsco River but found no trace of Chessie, the manatee who first wandered into the Chesapeake Bay in 1994.The search was prompted by reports from two people who said they had seen the 10-foot-long, 1,500-pound sea cow in the creek Monday, said biologist David Schofield, who flew over the area in a Department of Natural Resources helicopter with a DNR police officer and a video photographer.
NEWS
March 13, 1991
A molecular biologist testified in the rape trial of Willie Lee Small on Monday that lab tests showed that DNA taken from Small's blood matched DNA extracted from semen stains on the victim's underwear.Dr. Charlotte Word, of the Germantown testing facility Cellmark, testified that the probability of another person with a DNA profile matching Small was about 1 in 360,000.The biologist explained to the Circuit Court jury the process by which they take an individual's DNA, the cellular material that determines an individual's genetic makeup, and prepare it for identification purposes in criminal investigations.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
As the Baltimore Ravens' march to victory in Super Bowl XLVII defied the common wisdom of the sports world, so, too, has an examination of the genetics of their winged namesakes in the western United States led one local biologist to evidence he says defies the common wisdom of his field. Kevin Omland, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, said he's the department's "mascot biologist. " It happens that he teaches at a university in Baltimore County and has studied both the raven and the Baltimore oriole, although not from homegrown rooting interest.
NEWS
January 29, 2003
An article yesterday on the proposed Intercounty Connector in Montgomery County gave an incomplete account of the views of state biologist Charles R. Gougeon. Gougeon says that while some Maryland trout fisheries have survived highway construction, he believes building the ICC would likely reduce the brown trout population in the Paint Branch stream.
NEWS
November 19, 1993
Spotted owls have a friend in Washington.Jack Ward Thomas, the U.S. Forest Service biologist who led the studies that produced a policy of reducing timber harvests in national forests to save the bird in the Pacific Northwest, was named to head the agency. Mr. Thomas is the first biologist to get the top job in the agency, which is within the Agriculture Department. He replaces a Reagan appointee, Dale Robertson, whom the Clinton administration forced out.The appointment suggests a serious approach to conservation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 17, 2000
NEW YORK - An early-morning boater discovered the carcass of a finback whale floating in the ship channel between Brooklyn and Staten Island earlier this month, officials said. A biologist who examined the carcass said the whale, a young female, had apparently collided with a vessel. The biologist, Robert Di Giovanni, a senior scientist at the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation on Long Island, said the whale had a large abrasion and several broken ribs and broken vertebrae.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2013
With the 10th year of the modern Maryland bear hunt approaching, state bear biologist Harry Spiker, who has managed the hunt since its return after a 51-year absence, reflected in an interview with The Baltimore Sun on what happened when the hunt returned, whether he feels it has accomplisted its goals, and where the hunt - and the bears - will be going in the future. BS: With the 10th year of the bear hunt coming up this week (Oct. 21-26), what do you remember of the hunt back in 2004?
HEALTH
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
These are tough times for the ducks that winter on the Chesapeake Bay. Threatened food sources and an imperiled habitat are forcing migrating waterfowl to look for other winter digs. Alicia Berlin hopes to unlock the formula to win them back. In a quiet corner of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, the waterfowl biologist and her team are studying captive black ducks and scoters to find ways to make the bay more nurturing and learn more about the birds' time away from the Chesapeake.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
As the Baltimore Ravens' march to victory in Super Bowl XLVII defied the common wisdom of the sports world, so, too, has an examination of the genetics of their winged namesakes in the western United States led one local biologist to evidence he says defies the common wisdom of his field. Kevin Omland, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, said he's the department's "mascot biologist. " It happens that he teaches at a university in Baltimore County and has studied both the raven and the Baltimore oriole, although not from homegrown rooting interest.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Janet S. McKegg, whose career with the Department of Natural Resources spanned nearly three decades, died Friday from complications of Alzheimer's disease at Elternhaus, a Dayton assisted-living facility. The former West Friendship resident was 58. The daughter of a tool-and-die inspector and a seamstress, the former Janet Sponaugle was born in Washington County Hospital in Hagerstown. She was raised in Pleasant Valley near Boonsboro. A nature lover since she was a child, she often cared for the baby groundhogs and squirrels that her father had brought home to be raised.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
Dr. Richard Ruggiero, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, will make a presentation at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the Blue Heron Room at Quiet Waters Park on "The fight to save African elephants, rhinos, hippos, chimpanzees and gorillas: The amazing story of a U.S. biologist's quest to preserve Africa's wildlife. " Before that, he caught up to answer five questions about the topic. Let's start with the question you will pose: is it possible to save that part of the world?
SPORTS
June 25, 2011
What kind of critter takes a loaded shotgun into the woods out of hunting season to blow away a bird living in the leafy canopy overhead? It's a question that has kept me awake the last several nights after state wildlife officials announced that someone had killed perhaps Maryland's rarest of birds — a northern goshawk — while it was attempting to raise three chicks. And from the emails I've gotten, it's kept some of you up, too. It was a deliberate act. The nest was on public land, far from homes and commerce.
SPORTS
April 19, 1992
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Almost 20 years ago, a state fisheries biologist requested federal money to study and improvelargemouth bass fishing. It took three years to get a management program in the Chesapeake estuary under way.Since 1977, Leon Fewlass and a handful of biologists and technicians have been part of a booming recreational fishery built almost from scratch."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 17, 2005
GLACIER NATIONAL PARK, Mont. - In the gathering darkness, four biologists wearing headlamps surround an unconscious wolverine that is flat on its back. They check a transmitter implanted in its belly and fit another, larger one on a collar around its heavily muscled neck. Then they inject the animal with the antidote to the drug that knocked it out and place it in a box trap. An hour or so later, when the lid of the trap is opened, the animal clambers out and runs into the forest. Every two hours the position of the wolverine - known as M-1 - is fixed by a geo-positioning satellite and recorded in the collar.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2011
It could be two weeks before state officials know for certain what killed an estimated 2 million fish in the Chesapeake Bay. Or, they may never find out the exact cause. Biologists with the Maryland Department of the Environment sent tissue samples from the fish, mostly juvenile spot 3- to 6-inches long, to state labs to pinpoint the reason they died. But for now, they believe a rapid drop in temperature in December caused cold-water stress, said MDE spokeswoman Dawn Stoltzfus.
NEWS
By Frank Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 10, 2010
Biologists have found what they believe is the first evidence that Maryland bats are now infected with white nose syndrome, a deadly fungal disease that has killed more than a million hibernating bats since 2006, devastating colonies from New England to Virginia. A state biologist conducting a bat survey last Friday found dead and weakened bats in a cave on private property near Cumberland, the Department of Natural Resources reported Wednesday. About three-quarters of the winged mammals had the tell-tale white fungus on their muzzles and other exposed skin.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.