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Biological Warfare

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NEWS
By Mary Knudson | January 28, 1991
The Defense Department has accelerated production of vaccines against such virulent diseases as anthrax, cholera and typhoid in response to the possibility of biological warfare by Iraq.The intent is to rapidly make enough vaccine to inoculate all U.S. and allied troops in the Persian Gulf, an Army spokesman said yesterday. Inoculations began earlier this month, but the Army found a severe shortage of the vaccines.The military's anthrax vaccine is being produced by the Michigan Department of Public Health, which has been making anthrax vaccine for 25 years for use by workers who process animal hides and face the risk of contracting the disease from contaminated hides.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | April 28, 2005
Hartigan's styles New and old works by Baltimore artist Grace Hartigan will be on display at the C. Grimaldis Gallery starting Wednesday. Hartigan first became famous as an abstract expressionist who ran with Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning in New York City in the 1950s. She's shifted styles a number of times, and this show will include works from all phases of her career. There will be an opening reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday. The show, Grace Hartigan: A Survey, will be on display through June 11. The C. Grimaldis Gallery is at 523 N. Charles St. Hours are 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
It was one of the most bizarre military assignments of the Cold War, and a half-century later James R. Morgan remembers it vividly: He strapped on a face mask, clamped it to a port on the side of a huge Fort Detrick test chamber called "the Eight Ball" and inhaled the germs that would infect him with an exotic disease called Q fever. "I felt a little difference in the temperature of the air," says Morgan, 71, of Adelphi. "I knew at that moment I'm breathing something that's going to make me sick."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 28, 2003
Two years after the anthrax letter attacks, senior administration officials say they have new concerns about the nation's vulnerability to terrorist attacks with the deadly germ. Officials said their fears had intensified in part because they now recognize that anthrax spores can be more widely dispersed than previously thought. In addition, they said, terrorist suspects with ties to al-Qaida have told questioners that the group has been trying to obtain anthrax for use in attacks. One indication of concern was a secret Cabinet-level "tabletop" exercise conducted last month that simulated the simultaneous release of anthrax in different types of aerosols in several U.S. cities.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 27, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Despite years of warnings from experts, the United States is poorly prepared to defend its armed forces from the rising threat of germ warfare attack and lags even more in protecting Americans at home, defense officials say.As President Clinton and other leaders have been proclaiming the dangers of biological weapons, officials acknowledge that they are taking only the first steps to develop the high-technology gear, medicine and organization needed...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | April 28, 2005
Hartigan's styles New and old works by Baltimore artist Grace Hartigan will be on display at the C. Grimaldis Gallery starting Wednesday. Hartigan first became famous as an abstract expressionist who ran with Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning in New York City in the 1950s. She's shifted styles a number of times, and this show will include works from all phases of her career. There will be an opening reception from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday. The show, Grace Hartigan: A Survey, will be on display through June 11. The C. Grimaldis Gallery is at 523 N. Charles St. Hours are 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 1, 1992
The United States has reached an agreement in principle to buy billions of dollars' worth of bomb-grade uranium from scrapped Soviet nuclear arms in an attempt to bolster the shaky economy of the former Soviet Union and to reduce the risk of nuclear accidents and theft.The agreement, which would require the formal approval of both governments, calls for highly enriched uranium from Russian nuclear arms to be diluted for sale as commercial reactor fuel.It would be the first such agreement, and, if approved, would be a major step to reducing the dangers that made the Cold War so unnerving.
TOPIC
By Jeremy Rifkin | October 7, 2001
For the first few days after last month's terrorist attacks, we worried about more commercial airplanes being hijacked and used as missiles. Now we are worried about a new, more deadly threat: bacteria and viruses raining from the sky over populated areas, infecting and killing millions of people. Even more troubling is the fact that the genetic engineering technology being used commercially in the fields of agriculture, animal husbandry and medicine today is potentially convertible to the development of a wide range of pathogens that can attack plant, animal and human populations.
NEWS
July 8, 1995
When Iraq was growing anthrax and botulism diseases to use as weapons in the 1980s, it was embroiled in a seemingly endless war that it had started against a more populous country, Iran. When Iraq (it now says) dismantled these weapons, it was preparing a war of conquest against a smaller neighbor that it claimed had no right to exist, Kuwait.Iraq threatened at that time to invade a less populous but richer neighbor, Saudi Arabia. And it hurled ballistic missiles at population centers in still another country it maintained should not exist, Israel, in hopes of distracting Arab states from its own aggression against some of them.
NEWS
March 31, 1995
As the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty comes up for a review of its first quarter-century next month, the menace of other weapons of mass destruction intrudes. The nerve gas attack on the Tokyo subway March 20 and the difficulties of the United Nations in monitoring the chemical and biological warfare efforts of Iraq point to the growing accessibility of these evils.After the nerve gas episode in the provincial town of Matsumoto last June, possibly aimed at judges hearing a lawsuit against the cult Aum Shinri Kyo, Japanese police wanted to crack down on the chemical proclivities of that group.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2003
It was one of the most bizarre military assignments of the Cold War, and a half-century later James R. Morgan remembers it vividly: He strapped on a face mask, clamped it to a port on the side of a huge Fort Detrick test chamber called "the Eight Ball" and inhaled the germs that would infect him with an exotic disease called Q fever. "I felt a little difference in the temperature of the air," says Morgan, 71, of Adelphi. "I knew at that moment I'm breathing something that's going to make me sick."
NEWS
By Raphael G. Warnock | January 20, 2003
IF THE Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. were alive today, no single problem would demand more of his attention than the HIV/AIDS crisis. Though Dr. King died well over a decade before we heard of AIDS and though people promoting every human cause and every political persuasion enlist him freely for their version of what is best for America, this preventable virus is one of the greatest moral challenges of our times. His own words help to make the case: "As long as there is poverty in the world I can never be rich, even if I have a billion dollars.
NEWS
By James M. O'Neill and James M. O'Neill,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 26, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - Colleges usually act more like tortoises than hares when it comes to changing curricula. It can take a year or more to approve a professor's proposal for a new course. But many colleges resembled roadrunners after Sept. 11, scrambling to make courses on terrorism, Islam and related subjects available for the spring semester. A week after the terrorist attacks, Ursinus College biology professor Robert Dawley started gathering data on bioterrorism. Then the anthrax scare hit. Dawley suggested to colleague Anthony Lobo that they offer a new course on bioterrorism.
TOPIC
By Jeremy Rifkin | October 7, 2001
For the first few days after last month's terrorist attacks, we worried about more commercial airplanes being hijacked and used as missiles. Now we are worried about a new, more deadly threat: bacteria and viruses raining from the sky over populated areas, infecting and killing millions of people. Even more troubling is the fact that the genetic engineering technology being used commercially in the fields of agriculture, animal husbandry and medicine today is potentially convertible to the development of a wide range of pathogens that can attack plant, animal and human populations.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2001
In the wake of terrorist attacks last week, local and state health authorities are stepping up efforts to prepare for a possible biological or chemical attack. They're tracking ambulance runs and hospital emergency rooms for certain symptoms, putting physicians and labs on alert and considering stockpiling drug supplies. Some of the actions are part of emergency plans already in place; others are steps officials are adding to make Maryland as prepared as possible. "We want to make sure our systems are geared up to respond as best we can," said Dr. Bob Bass, the state's EMS director.
NEWS
By Faye Flam and Faye Flam,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 18, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Smallpox once was mankind's most deadly natural enemy, having killed more people in history than any other disease - 300 million in the 20th century alone. Though it was officially eradicated in 1980, concern over its use as a biological warfare agent has prompted the U.S. government to take an enormous interest in the virus. "One day there was this slew of poxvirus requests for applications," said Stuart Isaacs, a virologist at the University of Pennsylvania. "I nearly fell out of my chair."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A seven-year game of hide-and-seek has allowed Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein to preserve his power to make chemical, biological and nuclear weapons capable of killing millions, United Nations and U.S. officials say.While only about two dozen missiles are believed to be at his disposal, if political and economic sanctions are lifted, Hussein could put together a destructive arsenal with the materiel and expertise he has hidden from weapons inspectors,...
NEWS
By ANN LoLORDO | April 3, 1994
In the service of his country, Army Pvt. Thomas M. Kopko sat on a platform in the middle of the Utah salt flats, amid cages of noisy, scratching guinea pigs, and waited for a germ cloud to waft through the darkness. Soon, the 20-year-old soldier and the other medical research volunteers from Fort Detrick in Maryland were inhaling infectious Q fever bacteria.Today, at 59, Mr. Kopko can still remember how he instinctively held his breath as his commanding officers slipped on their gas masks during the 1955 project.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 7, 2000
WASHINGTON -- A public health plan is in place nationally to combat further spread of the mosquito-borne West Nile virus, which caused an outbreak of encephalitis in New York City last year, U.S. health officials say. Despite the effort, there is no guarantee against new cases, the officials said at a recent news conference. "We may see some cases here and there this year," but no one knows when and where the West Nile virus will strike, said Stephen Ostroff, who is coordinating the West Nile effort for the Department of Health and Human Services.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 1998
HARBIN, China -- On a cold morning in the fall of 1939, Japanese soldiers prepared to tie Huang Heyuan to a wooden cross and cut his heart out.Huang, then a 26-year-old Chinese construction worker, had been brought to a biological warfare testing center in Manchuria by Japanese soldiers who promised to help him. Instead, they injected Huang and other prisoners with bubonic plague and dissected them alive without anesthesia to study the bacteria's effects.Huang...
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