Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBiological Parents
IN THE NEWS

Biological Parents

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Larry Rohter and Larry Rohter,New York Times News Service | August 19, 1993
MIAMI -- A Florida judge ruled yesterday that Kimberly Mays, the teen-ager who has been the focus of a child custody dispute since it was discovered she was switched at birth with another child, may remain with the man she considers her father and has no obligation to maintain contact with her biological parents.Setting aside long-standing legal doctrines that regard biology as the primary determinant of parenthood, Judge Stephen L. Dakan of the Sarasota County Circuit Court declared that Ernest and Regina Twigg, who want visitation rights to the child they consider their own, "have no legal interest in or right to Kimberly Mays" and that the 14-year-old girl's wish never to see them again must be honored.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Devontay Hudson moved from one foster home to another for years, but last month he was adopted by a Millford Mill family - another symbol of a statewide initiative that has sharply reduced the number of children in foster care. The Gilman School sophomore, an aspiring chemical engineer, can't remember how old he was when he entered foster care, and doesn't know much about his birth family. But ask him about his adopted family and the soft-spoken teen says he's glad to be home. "It was a blessing for me to be a part of a family," said Devontay, 15, whose adoption increased the family of Ronald Wilkins and Demetria Jackson-Wilkins to nine members.
Advertisement
NEWS
By GAIL COLLINS | August 4, 1993
Sarasota, Fla.--A few days after she was born, Kimberly Mays was switched with another baby in the hospital nursery. Two sets of parents went home with the wrong infant.One of the many unfortunate results of that 14-year-old incident is that everyone involved has received multimillion-dollar settlements from the hospital.They therefore can afford to keep suing each other till the cows come home.''This case has been in court for five long years!'' cried one of Kimberly's three attorneys Monday.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | October 8, 2012
A group opposing same-sex marriage in Maryland began airing television commercials Monday morning that say children reared by their biological parents are best off. The Maryland Marriage Alliance, which paid for the ad, has yet to provide supporting material for that claim. We will add to this post when they do. The commercial is very similar to an anti-same-sex marriage ad that debuted recently in Minnesota. Both ads stress that the institution of marriage has been around for a long time, that marriage is about "more than what adults want for themselves" and make the claim that "children do best when raised by their married mom and dad. " The Maryland ad includes an interesting disclaimer that does not appear in the Minnesota spots: It allows that divorce and death also contribute to situations where children are raised outside of a nuclear family.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives passed a bill yesterday that would increase and expedite adoptions of children who have been abused or abandoned by their parents.The measure, approved 416-5, would make far-reaching changes in child welfare programs and federal law, so states could more easily take youngsters away from parents who had abused them. The changes include new requirements and financial incentives for states.Lawmakers from both parties said state officials had often tried to reunify families at all costs, with dire consequences for some children, who were beaten or even killed by their biological parents.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Congress gave final passage yesterday to a measure aimed at reducing bureaucratic roadblocks that contribute to neglected and abused children languishing in foster care rather than being adopted.The legislation, sponsored by Republican Sen. John H. Chafee of Rhode Island, was called by its supporters the first major policy change in federal regulations for the nation's foster care system in almost two decades.The bill directs states to move more quickly in transferring children from foster care into permanent families.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | August 5, 1993
It is a picture that haunts me like a bad dream: Jessica DeBoer crying in terror as she is wrenched from the home, the life, the people she has known all of her 2 1/2 years; wrenched away by a distant and seemingly unfeeling court decree.The heartbreaking spectacle Monday ended a two-year tug-of-war between the Schmidts, Jessica's biological parents from Iowa, and the DeBoers, the Michigan couple who had raised Jessica almost from birth and who had been trying, without success, to adopt her.It all began in February 1991.
NEWS
By Wade F. Horn | August 23, 1999
FOR ANY of the year 2000 presidential contenders searching for a school reform proposal guaranteed to improve test scores and educational achievement of America's children, I have just one word: Fathers. An involved father in every home is the best school reform initiative there is.Granted, delivering on this campaign promise won't be easy. Our society is still paying the price for 30 years of cultural denial about the importance of fathers and marriage, fooling ourselves into believing that children don't need fathers for anything but a child-support check and that any family structure is as good as any other.
NEWS
June 15, 1993
If bad facts make bad law, the adoption dispute now pending before the Michigan Supreme Court is a legal nightmare. In this case, a girl now two years old has become a trophy in a fierce struggle between her biological parents and the psychological parents she loves as mother and father -- and between the courts of Iowa, where the child was born, and Michigan, where she now lives.The biological parents hold the legal edge, since the father was deprived of a chance to claim or waive his rights when the mother wrongly named another man as father.
NEWS
September 1, 1993
In recent weeks, highly publicized cases involving the rights of biological parents have prompted much talk about the best interests of children. But the cases of the 2 1/2 -year-old girl who was returned to her biological parents in Iowa and a 14-year-old Florida girl who was granted judicial permission to sever ties with her biological family were as dramatic as they were unusual. For too many children, the issue isn't which family will serve their best interests, but whether they will ever have any family at all.In all the talk about children's best interests, it's important to remember the flesh-and-blood reality.
NEWS
May 23, 2012
In regard to the issue of same-sex marriage, there are really only two defining aspects to the core discussion, and which of these two you choose to focus upon will ultimately determine your final position, regardless of religious or political affiliation. Religion holds far less significance in this debate than is popularly portrayed by the media. The essence of this controversy is philosophical, not religious. The first consideration is that, in accepting same-sex marriage, we must of necessity be willing to re-define something that has a long tradition in many human cultures.
NEWS
March 10, 2006
Of the 6,196 child abuse and neglect allegations deemed credible by the Maryland Department of Human Resources last year, most of the children involved were nameless, faceless statistics to all but a select group of people - often the people charged with protecting them. State law keeps the identities of these children from being revealed to anyone else. Ensuring the confidentiality of victimized children is understandable and necessary. But the law also shields those who failed to safeguard the children from neglect, injury, sexual abuse and death - biological parents, state-sanctioned foster parents, court-appointed guardians, juvenile court judges, child protective services workers.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 29, 2005
A 41-year-old Baltimore mother pleaded guilty yesterday to killing her 18-month-old daughter, but city prosecutors said she did not bear sole responsibility for the death of her baby. Monalisa Mackey was not supposed to be left alone last February with the girl, Alicia Cureton, prosecutors said. A city juvenile court judge had given custody to the baby's biological father and ordered him not to leave the baby in Mackey's care. But prosecutors said the judge knew the parents lived together in a Southeast Baltimore rowhouse.
NEWS
September 12, 2003
Err on the side of protecting abused children The Sun's article on children in the juvenile welfare system who are sent back home only to be murdered by a parent was horrifying ("Abused, but sent home to die," Sept. 7). Biological parents relinquish their rights to their children when they abuse them. Period. If the law allows children to be sent back to an abusive parent, then change the law. If it's really all about money, then more money must be found. If it costs more to keep children in foster care, isn't it worth it to spend the money if these children don't die?
TOPIC
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2003
Two months before Travon Morris' first birthday in 1998, the toddler was taken from his abusive mother by the State of Maryland because social service workers feared he might die. Over the next four years, Travon was given back to his mother, Sheila Avery, and taken away several times. In January, after the boy was once again entrusted to her care, Avery killed him with scalding bath water. About a dozen children a year die in Baltimore the way Travon Morris did: while in the custody of abusive biological parents.
NEWS
By Ann Wlazelek and Ann Wlazelek,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 11, 2002
ALLENTOWN, Pa. - Michael L. Osman's only link to his roots is a store-bought baby blanket, white with traces of blue and yellow and a white satin border. He was found wrapped in the blanket 25 years ago, when, as a newborn, he was left inside an entrance to the former Allentown Hospital, now Lehigh Valley Hospital, at 17th and Chew streets. "The person who put me at the hospital saved my life," said Osman. Perhaps it was his birth mother, he said. Perhaps it was her friend. Whoever it was, Osman wants to know his true identity, why he was abandoned at the hospital in the wee hours of June 12, 1977, and if he inherited any health risks.
NEWS
By Eric Lekus and Eric Lekus,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 8, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A children's advocacy group called yesterday for major reforms in the nation's foster care system after issuing a report showing that 53,000 children who are eligible for adoption still languish in temporary homes.The group, the Boston-based Institute for Children, concluded that the main obstacle is the lack of strong incentives for states to help move foster children into permanent homes.Conna Craig, president of the institute, noted that the federal government reimburses states based on the length of time a child stays in foster care, no matter how long.
NEWS
August 9, 1993
The nation watched in horror last week as a 2 1/2 -year-old girl was taken from the people she knew as mommy and daddy to be given back to her biological parents. But in one sense little Jessica DeBoer/Anna Schmidt is lucky. Her problem is that two sets of parents love her and want her. Sadly, in the annals of adoption, that is a rarity.In Maryland alone, 1,300 children are awaiting adoption. They have been removed from whatever homes they had and placed in foster care, where caseworkers have determined that the only feasible future is to find them new parents.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | March 10, 2002
The 1996 welfare reform legislation is up for renewal this year, and the Bush administration is rewriting it to promote marriage among the poor. The administration's plan would include $200 million in federal money, matched by $100 million from the states, to fund innovative programs that promote marriage as an antidote to child poverty and a host of other social ills. Among the president's suggestions are an educational campaign on the importance of marriage and counseling for those approaching marriage.
NEWS
By Wade F. Horn | August 23, 1999
FOR ANY of the year 2000 presidential contenders searching for a school reform proposal guaranteed to improve test scores and educational achievement of America's children, I have just one word: Fathers. An involved father in every home is the best school reform initiative there is.Granted, delivering on this campaign promise won't be easy. Our society is still paying the price for 30 years of cultural denial about the importance of fathers and marriage, fooling ourselves into believing that children don't need fathers for anything but a child-support check and that any family structure is as good as any other.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.