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By Ellen Goodman | July 10, 2003
BOSTON - As someone who makes a living telling people what she thinks, I am aware that opinion-mongering is a dicey business. Even the dictionary offers this slippery definition: "a belief or conclusion held with confidence but not substantiated by positive knowledge or proof." Of course, it's a problem if you're discussing cilantro or the Red Sox. It's more unsettling when you're talking about the law. So when the Supreme Court ended with a bang, it left some queasiness behind. In the affirmative action case especially, there's been a good deal of conversation about the gap between Sandra Day O'Connor and Clarence Thomas.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance and Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
A biography of former Baltimore banker Ed Hale is set to detail his rise from a Sparrows Point upbringing to exploits in real estate, sports business and banking - working covertly for the CIA and surviving plane crashes along the way. Apprentice House, a student-run book publisher at Loyola University Maryland, is releasing "Hale Storm," by former Baltimore Sun columnist Kevin Cowherd , on Nov. 1. A preview of the book suggests Hale's story...
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NEWS
November 2, 2012
Why did Thomas Schaller leave out John F. Kennedy as one of the rich and politically privileged presidents in his recent column on President Obama's humble origins ("The virtues of a president with humble origins," Oct. 31)? First, we know nothing about Mr. Obama's early life. Who paid for his education and financed his early political career? Second, most of our early presidents were well off and served out of a sense of duty as statesmen, not as professional politicians whose only job is to be re-elected.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Philanthropist Willard Hackerman, who transformed a small construction firm into a national giant with $5 billion in annual billings and was instrumental in erecting Maryland landmarks such as Harborplace, died Monday of unknown causes at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 95. His firm, Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., completed the new University of Baltimore School of Law last year and built the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the National Aquarium and M&T Bank Stadium, among countless other projects around the city and state.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | June 4, 1991
We can only hope the written biography of Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, for which publishers are reportedly bidding $3-5 million, is a lot more revealing than a new television documentary about the U.S. commander of the Persian Gulf war.The latest edition of the A&E basic cable network's "Biography" series, premiering at 8 tonight, is billed as the first TV documentary about Schwarzkopf. But it is disappointingly skimpy.The show is comprised largely of film and tape clips from the familiar wartime press briefings and brief segments from other TV shows that have interviewed him, such as "20/20" and "Prime Time Live."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 16, 1994
The majority of the action tonight is in the nonfiction area. ABC's "Turning Point" and CBS' "48 Hours" fight for viewers in prime time, while independent TV and cable offerings include biographical portraits of Oskar Schindler, Harold Lloyd and Elvis Presley.* "Turning Point" (10-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Last week it was Charles Manson and company, in a "Turning Point" hour that profiled some of the killers on a murder spree. This week it was supposed to be a profile of the victims of a killer on a murder spree in Gainesville, Fla. (what range; what variety)
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,special to the sun | June 8, 2008
Ladies of Liberty By Cokie Roberts William Morrow / 481 pages / $26.95 Golda By Elinor Burkett HarperCollins / 480 pages / $27.95 Golda Meir was a Russian-born American citizen who became prime minister of Israel in 1969 at age 70. She has been the subject of numerous biographies. My Life, her ghost-written autobiography, became a best-seller even though she disdained it, claiming she hated indiscretion. Now with Golda, Elinor Burkett looks at this larger-than-life woman as a study in contrasts.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | April 12, 2012
I'm getting psyched to meet and introduce Walter Isaacson, author of the bestselling Steve Jobs biography, at the CityLit Festival in Baltimore this Saturday ! Are you going? It's an all day affair for book lovers. Or, if you want to just see Walter, come by at 3 pm, at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Central Branch . I read Isaacson's book last fall and it was a big influence, in a very personal way, on my life. As some of you know, I've been plotting my own little startup venture, with an app called NestPix.com . Reading about all the hurdles that Jobs overcame -- multiple bouts with catastrophic failure -- and learning about how he learned to trust his intuitution...Well, this was a message delivered at the right time for me. Steve Jobs didn't strike me as a man who had a lot of self-doubt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Ealy and Charles Ealy,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 21, 2005
BIOGRAPHY EUDORA WELTY: A BIOGRAPHY By Suzanne Marrs. Harcourt. 672 pages After a reductive 1998 biography by Ann Waldron and an insulting New Yorker article by Claudia Roth Pierpont, it's heartening to report that a new biography of Eudora Welty captures the humorous and unconventional spirit of one of the South's greatest writers. In Eudora Welty: A Biography, Suzanne Marrs manages to put the life and work of Welty in proper perspective, with the aid of numerous letters that are being made public for the first time.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,Orlando Sentinel | August 16, 1995
To several generations, he was among the most popular men in America, commanding 60 million fans with his rat-a-tat-tat radio delivery. If Walter Winchell's name has receded with time, his impact has grown. As a newspaper and radio columnist, he shaped the country's fascination with celebrity and foreshadowed today's tabloid excesses."Biography," on cable's A&E Network, surveys his roller-coaster career in "Walter Winchell: The Voice of America" at 8 tonight.The program enlists a strong group of witnesses, including columnists Jimmy Breslin and Liz Smith; biographer John Mosedale; Jane Kean, a Winchell paramour; former press agent Ernest Lehman; and Herman Klurfeld, the assistant who ghost-wrote Winchell's column.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2014
If you hate the extreme polarization of American life today, with more and more people talking to and living alongside only people who share their world view, blame Roger Ailes, chairman of Fox News. If you are angry about the loss of civility, the coarsening of the conversation of democracy, the gridlock in Washington and the nastiness of political discourse, blame Ailes. If you're troubled by the widespread criticism of an American president like Barack Obama, yes, that, too, is the fault of Ailes - as is even the fact that your vote has been all but turned into Confederate dollars by the power of big-interest money and media manipulators.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Ronald S. Coddington, an author and editor, has spent nearly four decades collecting Civil War-era images — especially cartes de visite, his favorite. Out of a collection of 2,500 images he has assembled, 1,500 are cartes de visite, with the remainder being daguerreotypes, ambrotypes and tintypes. In 2004, his first collection of images resulted in "Faces of the Civil War: An Album of Union Soldiers and Their Stories" published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. The format he used, in which he was able to research and write a thumbnail biography of each person, was so successful he did a second volume, "Faces of the Confederacy: An Album of Southern Soldiers and Their Stories," published in 2008.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Richard Ben Cramer, a former Baltimore Sun reporter who later became a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer and an acclaimed author chronicling the lives of politicians and legendary sports figures, died Monday of lung cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Mr. Cramer, who was 62, lived in Chestertown. "Richard's work as a gifted writer and deeply principled journalist made our Republic a better place; made us a stronger, more compassionate, and more understanding people," Gov. Martin J. O'Malley, a friend, said in a statement released Tuesday.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
Why did Thomas Schaller leave out John F. Kennedy as one of the rich and politically privileged presidents in his recent column on President Obama's humble origins ("The virtues of a president with humble origins," Oct. 31)? First, we know nothing about Mr. Obama's early life. Who paid for his education and financed his early political career? Second, most of our early presidents were well off and served out of a sense of duty as statesmen, not as professional politicians whose only job is to be re-elected.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
The optimistic incorporators and builders of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, the nation's first common carrier railroad, which was founded in Baltimore in 1827 and began building westward the next year, envisioned it would take 10 years and $10 million to reach the Ohio River at Wheeling. Instead, it took 25 years and $50 million, and when the first B&O train steamed into Wheeling on New Year's Day 1853, travel time from Baltimore had been reduced from days over rugged, primitive roads to just 16 hours.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2012
Cynthia Earl Kerman, a retired Villa Julie College faculty member who wrote biographies of a Quaker economist and a Harlem Renaissance writer, died of pneumonia July 22 at the Glen Meadows retirement community. She was 89 and had lived in Lauraville. Born Cynthia Earl in Srinagar, Kashmir in India, where her father was teaching physical education for the YMCA, she attended the Kodaikanal School. Family members said living in India made a lasting impression on her, and she revisited the country and occasionally prepared Indian meals for her guests when entertaining.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to The Sun | February 12, 1995
Whose life is it anyway, the subject's or the biographer's? Biography at its best is more than gossip, a window into the bizarre practices afflicting the notorious. Biography is the history of an era, as seen through the life of a figure who has transformed her or his own time. People read biographies to satisfy a hunger to discover how others lived. So much more disturbing, then, comes the malady that has recently infected the writing of women's biographies.A significant number of women authors seem to be exploiting their subjects, inflicting on them a victimization from which they purported to emancipate them when they announced that they were restoring forgotten or neglected women to their rightful place in literary history.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | June 11, 1991
Narrator Peter Graves gets it just about right when he says tonight that "we always call her 'Jackie,' as if we really knew her." But as shown by tonight's edition of the series "Biography," at 8 p.m. on the Arts & Entertainment basic cable service, we only think we knew Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.The show unequivocally, and perhaps accurately, states the widow of President Kennedy "became the most famous person in the world." Yet writer William F. Buckley, one of a number of public commentators interviewed in the show, observes most acutely that in spite of the fanatical interest of the tabloids, "she gives up just enough of herself to keep from being invisible."
NEWS
Baltimore Sun reporter | May 3, 2012
This official biography of Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III was provided by the Baltimore Police Department. Frederick H. Bealefeld, III was appointed Police Commissioner of the City of Baltimore, Maryland on November 20th, 2007 and commands the eighth largest police agency in the United States. With over three decades of service to the Baltimore Police Department, Commissioner Bealefeld is credited with reducing city homicides and violent crime to the lowest levels since the 1970's.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | April 12, 2012
I'm getting psyched to meet and introduce Walter Isaacson, author of the bestselling Steve Jobs biography, at the CityLit Festival in Baltimore this Saturday ! Are you going? It's an all day affair for book lovers. Or, if you want to just see Walter, come by at 3 pm, at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Central Branch . I read Isaacson's book last fall and it was a big influence, in a very personal way, on my life. As some of you know, I've been plotting my own little startup venture, with an app called NestPix.com . Reading about all the hurdles that Jobs overcame -- multiple bouts with catastrophic failure -- and learning about how he learned to trust his intuitution...Well, this was a message delivered at the right time for me. Steve Jobs didn't strike me as a man who had a lot of self-doubt.
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