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Tim Wheeler | February 17, 2012
A federal investigation of fraud in the renewable fuels industry in Baltimore and Texas has drawn congressional interest, with Republican leaders of a House panel expressing concern that the Environmental Protection Agency's handling of the cases could cause significant problems for the nation's motor fuels markets. Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and the energy and power subcommittee chairman, Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Ky., wrote the EPA's director of transportation and air quality earlier this month requesting a briefing on the investigation and questioning the agency's enforcement action against energy companies that bought the allegedly phony renewable fuel credits.
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NEWS
May 29, 2013
While the petroleum industry and alternative fuels supporters debate the merits of more domestic drilling versus providing assistance through the federal Renewable Fuels Standard in diversifying the transportation fuels market, it's important to note the protections afforded American consumers by the country's first commercially available advanced biofuel - biodiesel. Livestock producers such as the National Pork Producers Council have long been on record supporting biodiesel production because it reduces livestock costs, which ultimately benefits consumers.
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
Whenever she can, Heather Helfrich fills her Mercedes 240D with a specially blended diesel fuel designed to reduce emissions of toxic gases. So when she and her husband, Wilhelm, installed a new furnace in their home last month, it seemed natural to use the same alternative fuel source to heat their house. The couple will become Westminster-based Tevis Oil Co.'s first customers - and, perhaps, the first in the Baltimore area - to use soy biodiesel for home heating when the company's fueling truck makes a delivery stop today at their house in the Upperco area of Baltimore County.
FEATURES
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2013
A Perry Hall man was sentenced Friday to 121/2 years in prison and ordered to pay more than $42 million in restitution after being convicted of selling $9 million worth of fake biodiesel fuel credits to oil companies and commodities brokers. Rodney R. Hailey, 34, was found guilty in June of eight counts of wire fraud, 32 counts of money laundering and two counts of violating the Clean Air Act. Hailey operated Clean Green Fuel, a company that purportedly created renewable fuel from waste cooking oil but sold credits for more than 23 million gallons of biodiesel he never made.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | October 15, 2006
The chemistry lab at the Naval Academy smelled faintly like a fast-food restaurant or a doughnut shop. But the thick, purplish liquid swirling in the flask was nothing a midshipman would want drizzled on his dinner plate. Midshipmen had picked out all the bread crumbs and crusts from the used vegetable oil in King Hall, and Chad Theriault, 20, was adding, drip by drip, a potassium hydroxide solution, waiting for the syrupy goo to turn pink. Theriault, a sophomore, tinkered with the solution, eyeing the flask through his safety goggles and pouring in more and more potassium hydroxide until it changed color.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | April 2, 2007
Gas station attendants don't usually boast doctorates. So why does Ilya Goldberg, a genetics researcher at the National Institutes of Health, spend his Saturdays hanging out beside a fuel pump, filling up cars? Because it's not gasoline. It's biodiesel, a fuel pressed from soybeans. And Goldberg is one of 50 believers in the Baltimore Biodiesel Collective who volunteer their time and money to sell this alternative fuel every weekend from an organic garden store in Baltimore. Nearly pure vegetable fuel is not available at normal gas stations in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2003
Whenever she can, Heather Helfrich fills her Mercedes 240D with a specially blended diesel fuel designed to reduce emissions of toxic gases. So when she and her husband, Wilhelm, installed a new furnace in their home last month, it seemed natural to use the same alternative fuel source to heat their house. The couple will become Westminster-based Tevis Oil Co.'s first customers - and, perhaps, the first in the Baltimore area - to use soy biodiesel for home heating when the company's fueling truck makes a delivery stop today at their house in the Upperco area of Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
BERLIN - Ron Cascio calls oil "the devil's tea" and decries what he sees as America's heroin-like addiction to the flammable black goo that fuels wars in the Middle East and pollutes his small town on Maryland's Eastern Shore. So Cascio, a 50-year-old homebuilder, has gone cold turkey. For more than five years, he has avoided the gas pump and instead uses a form of vegetable oil in his pickup truck, station wagon, lawn tractor and the generator that powers his electric drills and saws.
NEWS
By Nicholas AuYeung and Daniel Buccino | July 14, 2005
AS AMERICA'S appetite for power increases at four times the rate of energy production, and as expensive and risky "alternative" energy sources such as nuclear power, fuel cell technology and more oil drilling continue to be debated, there is a true alternative already in the pipeline. Yet it is relatively unknown and underfunded. One of the simplest ways to combat the looming energy crisis is not yet in hybrids or electric cars or even the power of the wind and the sun. Short of running or walking to school and the workplace, a much more palatable solution is gaining popularity: biodiesel.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | June 26, 2007
Tyson Foods Inc., the biggest U.S. meat processor, and Syntroleum Corp. formed a joint venture to produce fuel from animal fat and vegetable oil in response to growing demand for energy from renewable sources. The venture's first project will be a $150 million plant that can produce 75 million gallons a year of synthetic fuel for the diesel, jet and military markets, the companies said in a statement. The plant, at a yet-to-be-chosen site, is expected to be operational in 2010, providing annual operating profit of $35 million to $60 million a year.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
Biodiesel producers told a congressional panel Wednesday that they're struggling to stay afloat in the aftermath of fraud cases uncovered in Baltimore and Texas, and a spokesman for petroleum refiners faulted the Environmental Protection Agency for slow response to a crisis he said has cost the industry $200 million so far. Members of the House Energy and Commerce oversight subcommittee pressed Environmental Protection Agency officials to work...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
A federal jury convicted a Perry Hall man Monday of wire fraud and money laundering for selling $9 million worth of bogus biodiesel credits to commodities brokers and oil companies - a case that has shaken the nation's renewable-fuel industry and prompted congressional inquiries about the adequacy of federal oversight. Rodney R. Hailey, 33, founder of Clean Green Fuel, could be sentenced to up to 20 years in prison on each of eight counts of wire fraud, 10 years for each of 32 money-laundering counts and two years each for the two counts of violating the Clean Air Act. U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles Jr., ordered Hailey taken into custody and set sentencing for Oct. 11. The jury took just 75 minutes to reach a verdict after a six-day trial that featured testimony about Hailey's splurging on luxury cars, real estate and diamond jewelry with proceeds from his sales of renewable fuel credits supposedly representing 23 million gallons of biodiesel.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
The defense lawyer for a Perry Hall man accused of fraudulently selling $9 million worth of fake renewable fuel credits said he didn't deceive anybody because victims knew they were buying phony credits for an unworkable federal energy program. Rodney R. Hailey's lawyer, assistant public defender Douglas R. Miller, contended that the large commodities brokerages and the oil company that bought Hailey's fuel credits didn't care that the credits were fake. "Everybody needed [credits]
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 17, 2012
A federal investigation of fraud in the renewable fuels industry in Baltimore and Texas has drawn congressional interest, with Republican leaders of a House panel expressing concern that the Environmental Protection Agency's handling of the cases could cause significant problems for the nation's motor fuels markets. Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, and the energy and power subcommittee chairman, Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Ky., wrote the EPA's director of transportation and air quality earlier this month requesting a briefing on the investigation and questioning the agency's enforcement action against energy companies that bought the allegedly phony renewable fuel credits.
NEWS
June 2, 2009
Officials from Merriweather Post Pavilion introduced a host of updates to the Columbia amphitheater Monday, ranging from expanded bathrooms and a new concession stand to green initiatives, such as a biodiesel fueling station and hundreds of new trees and shrubs. The renovations, which cost about $1 million, also include a gaming lounge with nine pinball machines and a 15 foot, 7,500 pound statue of a chicken. The improvements are another sign of the resurgence of the decades-old concert venue.
NEWS
March 3, 2008
Tomorrow's primary elections in Ohio and Texas could be decisive in determining who will be the Democratic Party's presidential nominee. The following excerpts are taken from phone interviews that the Editorial Board of The Sun conducted with Sen. Hillary Clinton and Sen. Barack Obama. How would you reinvigorate federal efforts to assist American cities like Baltimore? Well, one of the first things we're going to have to do is to get our budget under control. You know, if we're spending $9 billion a month in Iraq, that's money that can't be spent in our cities, and so I've been clear about the need for a phased withdrawal.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH COE and ELIZABETH COE,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 30, 2005
Each day before Dave Goldstein walks out the door of his Gaithersburg home and climbs into the front seat of his 1981 Mercury Lynx, he remembers to bring along a stack of papers with written answers to the questions he invariably gets from curious bystanders. "How fast can it go?" "How far?" "Where can I get one?" Ah, the joys of owning an electric car. Though Goldstein is one of fewer than 100 motorists in Maryland who are driving electric cars, he's feeling pretty good these days, because he doesn't have to worry about high gas prices.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1996
If the fumes from a passing boat smell more like french fries than diesel fuel, credit the versatile, sandy-brown soybean.In the past couple of weeks, the bean has made its way into the tanks of dozens of Maryland diesel-powered boats in the form of Soydiesel, an alternative fuel touted as environmentally safe, efficient and aesthetically pleasing.In hopes of developing a market for Soydiesel, the Maryland Soybean Board gave away 1,000 gallons of the fuel to boaters last weekend.Steve Elias, a Prospect Bay resident fueling his 36-foot trawler at Piney Narrows Yacht Haven in Chester on Saturday, was pleased.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | June 26, 2007
Tyson Foods Inc., the biggest U.S. meat processor, and Syntroleum Corp. formed a joint venture to produce fuel from animal fat and vegetable oil in response to growing demand for energy from renewable sources. The venture's first project will be a $150 million plant that can produce 75 million gallons a year of synthetic fuel for the diesel, jet and military markets, the companies said in a statement. The plant, at a yet-to-be-chosen site, is expected to be operational in 2010, providing annual operating profit of $35 million to $60 million a year.
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