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Biodefense

BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Rockville biotechnology company Emergent BioSolutions Inc. has struck a deal to buy Canadian firm Cangene Corp., which employs 100 people in Baltimore, for $222 million in cash, the companies said Thursday. Emergent is paying $3.24 per share for Cangene, gaining its products used in biodefense as well as its manufacturing capabilities. Cangene operates a contract manufacturing facility in the Carroll-Camden Industrial area along the Russell Street corridor. Emergent develops, manufactures and sells products used in defense and commercial markets, including treatments to prevent anthrax disease and remove or neutralize chemical warfare agents from skin.
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NEWS
August 1, 2006
The big, new and very secret biodefense lab now being built at Fort Detrick, in Frederick, will be developing even-deadlier strains of some of the world's most dangerous microbes, so as to find ways to ward them off. It's a very unsettling idea, made more so by this: The National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, as it's known, seems to have been founded on the notion, so common in the Bush administration and especially in the Department of...
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | June 26, 2006
Biologists at Fort Detrick's newest biodefense center may be asked to make some of the world's deadliest microbes even more dangerous than they already are. One of the biologists' jobs, according to chief scientist Bernard Courtney, will be to create pathogens to match strains that terrorists are clandestinely producing and then develop vaccines and drugs to combat them. But some arms control specialists worry that the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center - now operating out of borrowed lab space at the Frederick base and elsewhere - might develop new vaccine-resistant or lethal microbes without solid evidence of a terrorist plot to unleash similar bugs.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2003
Army scientists have reproduced the anthrax powder used in the 2001 mail attacks and concluded that it was made using simple methods, inexpensive equipment and limited expertise, according to government sources familiar with the work. The findings reinforce the theory that has guided the FBI's 18-month-old investigation - that the mailed anthrax was probably produced by renegade scientists and not a military program such as Iraq's. "It tends to support the idea that the anthrax came from a domestic source and probably not a state program," said David Siegrist, a bioterrorism expert at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies.
NEWS
By GREG BARRETT and GREG BARRETT,SUN REPORTER | March 3, 2006
FREDERICK -- The way people are flocking here and property prices are shooting up, it seems as if there must be gold buried in the gentle slopes of Maryland's most spacious county. But the prospect of a glittering future is best reflected in the vast expansion planned for Fort Detrick, the county's largest employer and future home to the largest biodefense research center in the country. Once a quiet dairying center with a rich Civil War heritage, Frederick is now a focal point in the war on terror, a conflict with no definable end. Three new high-security biodefense labs promise to bring thousands of professionals to Fort Detrick's new $1.2 billion National Interagency Biodefense Campus.
NEWS
November 24, 2007
Fort Detrick lab poses real threat As a former resident of Frederick, I found The Sun's report about local residents and officials questioning the biodefense labs under construction at Fort Detrick very interesting ("Biodefense lab causing qualms," Nov. 19). That report failed to mention, however, that in addition to the 1,425 researchers projected to work at the base, there are thousands of students who attend class right next door. Frederick Community College enrolls approximately 5,000 full- and part-time students, and the Frederick County Career and Technology Center is also located on its campus.
NEWS
September 22, 2003
Driven to raise rate Used to be you could pull up close to the Inner Harbor, plunk quarters in a meter and leave the car for a spell. No longer. City officials, bugged that the Light Street lot was hogged by meter-feeding workers from area shops and restaurants, raised prices and put it under private control. Just before Labor Day, as it happened, rates at that lot shot up from $1 an hour to $5 for the first hour and $16 all day. "We don't want employees parking all day long," said Jeff Sparrow, who leads the Baltimore City Parking Authority.
NEWS
March 9, 2003
Researchers at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center have obtained a patent with applications for biological-agent detection technology, the research center reports. The patent, which was awarded Dec. 31, involves a new spectroscopic method for the diagnosis of DNA damage. The procedure can be implemented with equipment used to detect the presence of biological weapons on battlefields. "This patent represents the hard work and dedication of our employees," said Jim Zarzycki, technical director of the Edgewood center.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
With its airy lobby and sunlit corridors, the Department of Homeland Security lab at Fort Detrick looks at first more like a modern office building than a place where some of the world's deadliest substances are handled. But the mission becomes clearer as those corridors lead to clusters of rooms, some with submarine-style air locks and foot-thick concrete walls, where air flows are measured and displayed on monitors throughout the building. And instead of art, images of bacteria hang on the wall.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
In a surprise move announced yesterday, the staff of the biodefense policy center at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is leaving Hopkins to create a similar center for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. But the University of Pittsburgh's new Center for Biosecurity will have its headquarters in Baltimore, as well as offices in Washington and Pittsburgh, said Dr. Tara O'Toole, director of Hopkins' Center for Civilian Biodefense Strategies. "We're taking everybody with us," O'Toole said of the 20- person staff.
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