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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
A panel of independent scientists has found flaws in the Army's planning to shield workers and the public from harm from a proposed biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick in Frederick. The seven-member committee assembled by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that the risk assessment being done by an Army contractor is "not sufficiently robust" to help design a facility that will reduce potential hazards. The $584 million, 492,000-square-foot Medical Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Facility would develop and test vaccines and drugs to prevent or treat infectious diseases.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
Rockville biotechnology company Emergent BioSolutions Inc. has struck a deal to buy Canadian firm Cangene Corp., which employs 100 people in Baltimore, for $222 million in cash, the companies said Thursday. Emergent is paying $3.24 per share for Cangene, gaining its products used in biodefense as well as its manufacturing capabilities. Cangene operates a contract manufacturing facility in the Carroll-Camden Industrial area along the Russell Street corridor. Emergent develops, manufactures and sells products used in defense and commercial markets, including treatments to prevent anthrax disease and remove or neutralize chemical warfare agents from skin.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 21, 2004
Three veteran biological arms control experts have published a statement questioning research plans for a Department of Homeland Security biodefense lab at Fort Detrick, saying it may undermine the international ban on biological weapons. The commentary, posted this week on the Web site of the journal Politics and the Life Sciences, expresses concern that the government's aggressive biodefense efforts could backfire by prompting other nations to step up research on bioweapons. At the heart of the problem is the fact that there is often little difference between defensive and offensive bioweapons research.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
With its airy lobby and sunlit corridors, the Department of Homeland Security lab at Fort Detrick looks at first more like a modern office building than a place where some of the world's deadliest substances are handled. But the mission becomes clearer as those corridors lead to clusters of rooms, some with submarine-style air locks and foot-thick concrete walls, where air flows are measured and displayed on monitors throughout the building. And instead of art, images of bacteria hang on the wall.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
Even as the FBI investigates a possible link between U.S. biodefense programs and last fall's anthrax attacks, a flood of new funding for bioterrorism research promises to increase rapidly the number of labs and people with access to such lethal pathogens. Some scientists say that without new limits and tougher regulations, the law of unintended consequences could come into play. The biodefense research boom could lead to diversions of organisms or expertise for new terrorist attacks, making Americans less safe rather than safer.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | November 19, 2007
FREDERICK -- Construction is already under way on a new $1 billion biodefense research center at Fort Detrick, but some neighboring residents - and at least one elected official - are questioning how safe it is to expand laboratories working with dangerous disease agents such as Ebola and smallpox in the midst of the densely populated Frederick community. Fort Detrick, which has been working with deadly pathogens since World War II, is an economic engine for Frederick County and has enjoyed staunch support from local business and political leaders for decades.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 6, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Department of Homeland Security has said it will move forward with planning and construction of a new biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick in Frederick, after the project cleared its environmental review. The National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, scheduled to be completed in 2008, will have Biosafety Level 4 laboratories, which handle the most dangerous and infectious agents. It will research the causes of those diseases and develop countermeasures to possible bioterrorism.
NEWS
By Kenneth King | February 28, 2011
Frederick residents have had plenty of reminders lately why they should be concerned about the biodefense facilities in their midst: an ongoing cancer cluster investigation related to past groundwater contamination, an Agent Orange protest, and headlines about the 2001 anthrax attacks — which the FBI still insists were perpetrated by a researcher at Fort Detrick's U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). Little wonder, then, if Frederick residents are troubled about the latest risky biodefense facility at Fort Detrick: a 460,000-square-foot Medical Countermeasures and Test Facility, which, it appears, will aerosolize large numbers of monkeys with bioweapons agents.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
Academic researchers, business leaders and government officials said yesterday that they will band together to devise a strategy to jumpstart the government's Project BioShield, a stalled initiative to develop vaccines and other countermeasures against bioterrorism. "We believe that, just by being ingenious and creating a program of policy recommendations, Congress and the executive branch will run with it," Michael Greenberger, director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security (CHHS)
NEWS
October 7, 2001
GOVERNMENTS are notorious for their lethargy and lack of urgency. That's one reason Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley has glommed onto the current national crisis as a justification for stepping up the city's all-around emergency preparedness. He has called in all the chief executives of area hospitals to make sure they have disaster plans to cope with bioterrorism. Paramedics and emergency rooms now monitor patients for any symptoms of smallpox or anthrax, which are regarded as the most likely biological weapons.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
A panel of independent scientists has found flaws in the Army's planning to shield workers and the public from harm from a proposed biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick in Frederick. The seven-member committee assembled by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that the risk assessment being done by an Army contractor is "not sufficiently robust" to help design a facility that will reduce potential hazards. The $584 million, 492,000-square-foot Medical Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Facility would develop and test vaccines and drugs to prevent or treat infectious diseases.
NEWS
By Kenneth King | February 28, 2011
Frederick residents have had plenty of reminders lately why they should be concerned about the biodefense facilities in their midst: an ongoing cancer cluster investigation related to past groundwater contamination, an Agent Orange protest, and headlines about the 2001 anthrax attacks — which the FBI still insists were perpetrated by a researcher at Fort Detrick's U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). Little wonder, then, if Frederick residents are troubled about the latest risky biodefense facility at Fort Detrick: a 460,000-square-foot Medical Countermeasures and Test Facility, which, it appears, will aerosolize large numbers of monkeys with bioweapons agents.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | August 2, 2008
WASHINGTON - Fort Detrick, where scientist Bruce E. Ivins worked for more than three decades, is the largest U.S. government research center focused primarily on biodefense. Set on a former airfield north of Frederick where the Maryland National Guard once based a fleet of biplanes, it houses dozens of labs. Chief among them is the military's main research facility on biological weapons, the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), where Ivins and other microbiologists worked on anthrax and other deadly agents.
NEWS
November 24, 2007
Fort Detrick lab poses real threat As a former resident of Frederick, I found The Sun's report about local residents and officials questioning the biodefense labs under construction at Fort Detrick very interesting ("Biodefense lab causing qualms," Nov. 19). That report failed to mention, however, that in addition to the 1,425 researchers projected to work at the base, there are thousands of students who attend class right next door. Frederick Community College enrolls approximately 5,000 full- and part-time students, and the Frederick County Career and Technology Center is also located on its campus.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | November 19, 2007
FREDERICK -- Construction is already under way on a new $1 billion biodefense research center at Fort Detrick, but some neighboring residents - and at least one elected official - are questioning how safe it is to expand laboratories working with dangerous disease agents such as Ebola and smallpox in the midst of the densely populated Frederick community. Fort Detrick, which has been working with deadly pathogens since World War II, is an economic engine for Frederick County and has enjoyed staunch support from local business and political leaders for decades.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,sun reporter | July 19, 2007
Maryland has been eliminated from a national competition to land a $450 million laboratory for research dedicated to protecting the country's agriculture and food from disease and terrorism threats. The 520,000-square-foot lab is expected to play a critical role for the country in assessing bioterrorism threats over the next five decades. It could have helped the state boost its already growing presence in the biodefense research field and created hundreds of new jobs. "Maryland would have been an ideal location for the proposed National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility, as we are well-positioned to support this type of facility," state Business and Economic Development Secretary David Edgerley said in a statement.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 2004
The federal government has responded to the threat of bioterrorism with a spending blitz that has already surpassed the annual cost of the Manhattan Project to build the first atom bomb. But as illustrated by a recent mishap in which a Frederick lab inadvertently shipped lethal anthrax across the country, the biodefense push might be creating new hazards even as it seeks to make the country safer. The flood of new money - $14.5 billion spent since 2001 - has drawn scores of new researchers and facilities into the field, creating more possibilities for the release of anthrax and other "select agents," the legal term for pathogens with bioterrorist potential.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | June 26, 2006
Biologists at Fort Detrick's newest biodefense center may be asked to make some of the world's deadliest microbes even more dangerous than they already are. One of the biologists' jobs, according to chief scientist Bernard Courtney, will be to create pathogens to match strains that terrorists are clandestinely producing and then develop vaccines and drugs to combat them. But some arms control specialists worry that the National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center - now operating out of borrowed lab space at the Frederick base and elsewhere - might develop new vaccine-resistant or lethal microbes without solid evidence of a terrorist plot to unleash similar bugs.
NEWS
August 1, 2006
The big, new and very secret biodefense lab now being built at Fort Detrick, in Frederick, will be developing even-deadlier strains of some of the world's most dangerous microbes, so as to find ways to ward them off. It's a very unsettling idea, made more so by this: The National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, as it's known, seems to have been founded on the notion, so common in the Bush administration and especially in the Department of...
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