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By CAREY GOLDBERG and CAREY GOLDBERG,BOSTON GLOBE | January 6, 2006
Meditation seems to energize the sleep-deprived. It seems to help with concentration. It even seems to bolster the very structure of the brain as we age. Neuroscientists presenting their latest research at a convention of 34,000 colleagues in November had so much praise for meditation that it was starting to sound like a mantra. Their work fits into a growing body of data that tries to bring modern science to bear on age-old methods to quiet the mind. Enthusiasts have long praised the health benefits of meditative practices such as chanting, yoga, and prayer.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
Chris Neaves, a student and musician, died of undetermined causes July 21 at his Columbia home. He was 21. Born David Christopher Neaves in Lewisville, Texas, he moved to Howard County in 2006 after spending three years in Windsor, England, with his family, where he attended the TASIS American School and played rugby. He was a 2010 graduate of Chapelgate Christian Academy in Marriottsville. He spent a year at Clemson University in Clemson, S.C. At his death, he was a biochemistry student at Howard Community College and worked as a lot attendant at Antwerpen Toyota in Clarksville.
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EXPLORE
May 27, 2011
Ithaca College bestowed a Peggy R. Williams Award for Academic and Community Leadership upon Arbutus resident DeAsia Gilmer. A junior majoring in biochemistry, she is enrolled in the School of Humanities and Sciences.
EXPLORE
May 27, 2011
Ithaca College bestowed a Peggy R. Williams Award for Academic and Community Leadership upon Arbutus resident DeAsia Gilmer. A junior majoring in biochemistry, she is enrolled in the School of Humanities and Sciences.
NEWS
May 7, 1995
Dr. Carol A. Rouzer, associate professor of chemistry, was named the 1995 Distinguished Teacher at Western Maryland College during the annual Senior Investiture and Honors Convocation April 30.A faculty member since 1989, Ms. Rouzer was honored for her ability to explain complex concepts and their applications to students, and to challenge them in the classroom and outside it.A native of Hagerstown, Ms. Rouzer graduated with highest honors from Western Maryland...
NEWS
May 31, 2006
Katie Serlemitsos, Old Mill SPORT LACROSSE GIRLS STATS -- A team captain and defender for the Patriots, Serlemitsos was known for intercepting opponents' passes. Serlemitsos' senior year was her second on the varsity and she hopes to play club lacrosse at Virginia. SIDELINES -- Serlemitsos, who also played basketball and soccer in high school, has a 4.56 weighted grade point average and plans to major in biochemistry. A Maryland Distinguished Scholar finalist and a National Merit Scholar, she is president of the National Honor Society and a student leader and peer helper who is also involved in several community activities.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
A 20-year-old Dominican immigrant and Loyola College student who developed an interest in science while teaching himself English was named a Rhodes scholar during the weekend.Jose Vargas of Gaithersburg is one of 32 American students who received the prestigious award. Vargas plans to study biochemistry for two years at Oxford University in England after he graduates in May. He is Loyola's first Rhodes scholar."Getting [named a Rhodes scholar] is the kind of thing you're so excited about because you're so focused on trying to do your best," Vargas said yesterday.
FEATURES
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1995
Despite her Ph.D. in biochemistry, Karen Hopkin began with a seemingly questionable hypothesis: that the world of science is full of studs. That underneath some of those shapeless lab coats are hunks just yearning to breathe free. That there are electrical engineers who could achy-breaky your circuits, physicists who could smash not just particles but stereotypes.Senior vice president, R&D, at MedImmune Inc. in GaithersburgSchedule: 5 a.m. game of squash or racquetball, a long run before bedtimeEarly science leanings: Caught frogs, turtles, butterflies, beetlesLunch favorite: Sushi several times a weekFlying high when: His biotech company makes a breakthrough, and on weekends when he pilots a Cessna to his summer place on the Jersey shore
NEWS
August 9, 2000
Student: Albert K. Luo, 17 School: Centennial High School Special achievement: Selected as a candidate in the Presidential Scholars Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education based on SAT scores, recommendations from his principal and counselor, high school transcript and activities. What he says about it: "I was honored because I see it as recognition of all the work and effort I have put in throughout high school. To be chosen as a candidate reflects not only academic achievement, but also participation in music and student organizations.
NEWS
March 6, 1992
Roger M. Herriott, an expert on viruses who was a retired professor and chairman of biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, died Monday of cancer at his home on Highland Avenue in Towson. He was 83.Dr. Herriott was named a professor emeritus in 1975 but continued to do research and writing until his death.He had headed the department at the Hopkins school since joining the faculty there in 1948.Studying a virus that infects bacteria, he suggested that the virus could inject the bacteria with DNA as if it were a hypodermic needle, a discovery that had applications to viruses that infect human and animal cells.
NEWS
May 31, 2006
Katie Serlemitsos, Old Mill SPORT LACROSSE GIRLS STATS -- A team captain and defender for the Patriots, Serlemitsos was known for intercepting opponents' passes. Serlemitsos' senior year was her second on the varsity and she hopes to play club lacrosse at Virginia. SIDELINES -- Serlemitsos, who also played basketball and soccer in high school, has a 4.56 weighted grade point average and plans to major in biochemistry. A Maryland Distinguished Scholar finalist and a National Merit Scholar, she is president of the National Honor Society and a student leader and peer helper who is also involved in several community activities.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 10, 2006
Cecile M. Pickart, a Johns Hopkins scientist and teacher who worked to find treatments for cancer and Alzheimer's disease by studying a critical cellular protein, died Wednesday at her Tuscany-Canterbury home. She was 51. Diagnosed with kidney cancer four years ago, she died of the disease "wrapped in the shawl that all her former students gave her last summer with their names embroidered on it," said her partner, Jennifer Rose. A professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dr. Pickart studied the protein ubiquitin, so named because it is found in all animal cells.
NEWS
By CAREY GOLDBERG and CAREY GOLDBERG,BOSTON GLOBE | January 6, 2006
Meditation seems to energize the sleep-deprived. It seems to help with concentration. It even seems to bolster the very structure of the brain as we age. Neuroscientists presenting their latest research at a convention of 34,000 colleagues in November had so much praise for meditation that it was starting to sound like a mantra. Their work fits into a growing body of data that tries to bring modern science to bear on age-old methods to quiet the mind. Enthusiasts have long praised the health benefits of meditative practices such as chanting, yoga, and prayer.
NEWS
February 18, 2005
State did what it could to help troubled youths "Tragic" is the right description for the lives of both young men, Philip E. Parker Jr. and Kevin G. Johns Jr. But for The Sun to imply that they both went begging for help from the state and did not receive it doesn't sound right. According to "Parallel Lives, Tragic Ending" (Feb. 13), the Department of Social Services came into Kevin Johns' life when he was 3 years old. He was in and out of foster homes and institutions until age 18. He was diagnosed with many disorders.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2004
When he retired after more than 38 years in research and development at Washington's Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the last thing biochemist Nesbitt D. Brown wanted was a second career. But when Howard High School invited him to be its volunteer scientist-in-residence, Brown couldn't resist. The 70-year-old Columbia resident hasn't missed a Tuesday or Thursday in eight years of working with students. "I never had time to go into that blue mode, depression," after retiring, Brown said.
NEWS
January 25, 2004
Agatha Ann Siegenthaler Rider, who taught and performed research in biochemistry at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, died Jan. 18 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Morningside Assisted Living House in Ellicott City. She was 84 and had previously lived in Columbia. Born Agatha Ann Siegenthaler in Buffalo in 1919 and known as Aggie, she moved with her family in 1935 to Baltimore, where her father, the Rev. Gottlieb Siegenthaler, was pastor of St. Matthew United Church of Christ until 1960.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 16, 1996
Her book was open, but her eyes were shut. The finer points of biochemistry -- or, more precisely, the chemical composition of various citric acids -- were enough to leave Soleyah Groves snoozing."
NEWS
August 9, 2000
Student: Albert K. Luo, 17 School: Centennial High School Special achievement: Selected as a candidate in the Presidential Scholars Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education based on SAT scores, recommendations from his principal and counselor, high school transcript and activities. What he says about it: "I was honored because I see it as recognition of all the work and effort I have put in throughout high school. To be chosen as a candidate reflects not only academic achievement, but also participation in music and student organizations.
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