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NEWS
April 15, 1992
Anne Arundel County's Amusement License Commission ought to be alarmed by the criminal sentences linked to Bingo World, the county's largest bingo parlor.Dominic P. Cortina and Sam Frank Urbana, two reputed mobsters, are facing time for their part in a money-laundering scheme allegedly masterminded by Bingo World owner Stephen B. Paskind. According to court documents, Urbana arranged for Chicago gangsters to buy a 42 percent stake in the business which, as far as county officials knew, was 84 percent owned by Mr. Paskind.
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NEWS
By Chris Yakaitis and Phillip McGowan and Chris Yakaitis and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporters | February 1, 2007
At Bingo World in Brooklyn Park, rows of new video-gaming machines dazzle with displays of spinning cherries, 7's and BAR icons. The machines emit a series of throaty "ka-chings" when the symbols line up, and they can spit out vouchers that can be redeemed for hundreds of dollars. Some patrons who feed $20 bills into the machines call them "slots," but the operators of three bingo halls in Anne Arundel County that have installed 200 of the machines during the past year consider them instant video bingo machines that conform with state and county laws.
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NEWS
March 9, 1994
Attorneys for Bingo World have appealed to Anne Arundel Circuit Court the county Board of Appeals' decision not to renew the Brooklyn Park hall's license to operate.The appeal was filed less than a week after the board rejected Bingo World's application because the investment group that plans to buy the hall would allow Steven B. Paskind, the principal owner, to stay involved in the operation as a creditor.Mr. Paskind has been linked to organized crime in testimony to U.S. Senate. Several of his associates were convicted in 1992 in U.S. District Court in Baltimore of funneling profits from gambling, loan-sharking, robbery and other enterprises through Bingo World.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2005
Rows and rows of players hunch over long, brown tables, puffing cigarettes as they use fat markers to color each square that corresponds to the numbers flashing on boards in each corner of the hall. The scene at Bingo World - a large, open hall located just off the highway in Brooklyn Park - rarely changes, whether it's a chilly afternoon in March or a balmy evening in August. But the operators of Bingo World and Anne Arundel County's other two commercial bingo establishments worry that competition, especially from slot machines, could wreck that stability.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | June 17, 1994
The owners of a Brooklyn Park bingo hall may renew their operating license and transfer it to another investment, under a ruling yesterday by an Anne Arundel Circuit judge.Judge Eugene M. Lerner's opinion, released yesterday, overturns an earlier ruling by the county Board of Appeals. Judge Lerner ruled that the board had acted "arbitrarily, illegally and capriciously" in March when it denied Bingo World's application for license renewal.The board rejected the application because it believed the investment group, Arundel Amusements, would let Stephen B. Paskind, Bingo World's principal owner, stay involved in the operation as a creditor.
NEWS
March 4, 1994
The Board of Appeals has affirmed its decision to deny a request to transfer a Brooklyn Park bingo hall's operating license to an investment group.In a written decision issued Wednesday, the board said the proposed arrangement was unsatisfactory.The deal called for Arundel Amusements to pay Stephen Paskind, owner of Bingo World, $4.1 million over five years. The payments were to be made monthly.The board voted in November to uphold a December 1992 decision by Robert Dvorak, then county director of inspections and permits, denying the license transfer.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
Contending that that they have been cheated out of profits, eight shareholders of Bingo World filed a federal lawsuit yesterday against the principal owner of the northern Anne Arundel County bingo hall.The shareholders, who invested $423,000 in 1986, own 16 percent of Bingo World's stock.The lawsuit, filed yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, also says the minority shareholders were not told of the operation's ties to organized crime when they made their investment.Six people associated with the operation have pleaded guilty to federal money-laundering conspiracy charges.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | November 7, 1993
A lawyer for a Brooklyn Park bingo hall that had its request for a license transfer rejected by the county Appeals Board said the business could be forced into bankruptcy.D. Christopher Ohly said Friday that the Appeals Board's 3-1 vote to deny the transfer of Bingo World's operating license from Steven B. Paskind to Arundel Amusements leaves his client with few options.Last week's vote upheld a decision in December by Robert Dvorak, county director of inspections and permits, to block the transfer and close the establishment, on the basis of Mr. Paskind's alleged ties to organized crime.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 1, 1992
The county has decided to let Bingo World owner Stephen Paskind, a Florida businessman with alleged ties to organized crime, apply for a permit to continue operating -- secure in the belief that he will be turned down.For months, the county has refused to allow Mr. Paskind to apply for a license renewal, saying he did not have the "good moral character" required to operate a bingo parlor under county law. But officials said yesterday that they would not appeal last month's Circuit Court ruling clearing the way for such an application.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Staff writer | April 21, 1992
Donald John Angelini, one of six organized crime figures tied to a Brooklyn Park bingo hall, pleaded guilty yesterday to conspiring to launder nearly $2 million in ill-gotten money through the hall.Angelini, known as "The Wizard of Odds" in Chicago, became the fifth mobster to admit he schemed with the others in 1986 to funnel profits from gambling, loan-sharking, robbery and interstate transportation of stolen property through Bingo World, which Stephen B. Paskind, a Florida bingo operator, was buying at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2003
Baltimore is a bingo-loving city. Speckling the town are churches, local civic clubs and community halls that for decades have offered regular rounds of the age-old game. And with a few local bingo houses running daily and late-night operations, local residents can get their game on wherever and whenever they so desire. But many players have their favorite lucky spot and return to it time and again. Heath Anshel, manager of Bingo World on Belle Grove Road, said that some of his regular customers will even arrive hours before the start of the first 7:30 p.m. game.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2000
It's a familiar scene in rural southern Anne Arundel County: Buses pull up to Wayson's Bingo and spill out gamblers from around the region. All hope fortune will smile on them inside the nondescript hall filled with old-timers and endless twisting plumes of cigarette smoke. But Wayson's and two other commercial bingo operators - Bingo World in Brooklyn Park and Daily Double Bingo in Laurel - want to be able to dangle even bigger cash lures to patrons in hopes of boosting business. That, in turn, would pad profits and help them continue to thrive, or at least, survive, they say. The small but politically connected industry has proposed changing county law to increase cash prizes for the first time since 1991.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2000
AFTER 40-PLUS hours toiling away at the office every week, spending the weekend in the kitchen is not my idea of how to unwind. Fortunately, two local churches are offering tasty solutions. St. John's Women of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of American will hold its annual soup and baked potato sale from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday in the church social hall. It always features an assortment of homemade soups, baked potatoes with toppings, and desserts. The cost of a bowl of soup with bread is $1.50, and a baked potato with toppings can range from $1 to $2. A carryout quart of soup may be purchased for $3.50.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | February 6, 2000
Today, pieces of columns-- Anne Arundel County has its quirks. There's the satirical Maritime Republic of Eastport, an Annapolis neighborhood that has "seceded" from the mainland to become a sovereign nation. MRE calls its city council representative an ambassador to Annapolis, which it calls Westport. There's County Executive Janet S. Owens, a smoker from a long line of tobacco farmers,who officially supports anti-smoking campaigns -- and supports them staunchly. And there's commercial bingo.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
A 16-year-old Severn boy was burned yesterday when a television antenna he was trying to remove from the roof of his home struck a power line, police said.Robert Wayne Stankiewicz, of the 7800 block of Old Quarterfield Road, was listed in guarded condition late yesterday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.Police spokeswoman Officer Carol Frye said Stankiewicz was helping James Phillips Jr., 37, of the first block of Cedar Drive in Glen Burnie, take the antenna down from the roof of the house on Quarterfield Road about 11: 25 a.m.Frye said the two had climbed off the roof and were standing on the ground when the antenna toppled and struck a high-tension wire.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | June 1, 1997
Dorothy L. Moore buried her mother's first cousin, then headed to Bingo World in Brooklyn Park to try her luck at a special early bird afternoon game, still dressed in black.A few seats down from Moore, in row 15, Melvin Powell, a native of Kinston, N.C., erected a gambler's shrine of four troll dolls, a ceramic rabbit missing one ear, photographs of family members and a sign that read: "Kill the caller."At another table, Michael Smith, 30, and his friends were among the few men playing a game often associated with little old ladies at charities, church socials and fire halls.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | June 30, 1992
An advisory group set up to regulate bingo parlors voted yesterday to reject a proposal that would have transferred Stephen B. Paskind's bingo license, saying it didn't have the legal authority.The Amusement License Commission voted, 6-0, to reject a sales package that would have transferred Paskind's license to a partnership among a Millersville real estate developer and four Baltimore lawyers. Commission members said they couldn't approve the transfer because Paskind has no license."We're saying any settlement offer is not within the commission's authority," said D. Boone Wayson, an Annapolis resident and bingo hall operator who proposed the motion to deny the permit transfer.
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