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Binge Drinking

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NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | April 6, 1995
Freshmen who enroll in colleges where many students engage in binge drinking are quick to adopt the binge-drinking lifestyle, according to a survey released yesterday.In the survey of 720 freshmen, 41 percent of those who said they did not binge drink in high school began drinking heavily shortly after arriving at colleges known for their "party" atmosphere.The findings come on the heels of a national study by the same researchers, which showed that almost half of U.S. college students are frequent heavy drinkers -- leading to serious health problems and other consequences for themselves and other students.
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NEWS
By Richard S. Madaleno Jr | August 4, 2014
Excessive drinking among college students is a public health problem that is larger than just the colleges and universities. It is a problem for our entire state. The more than 270,000 students attending college in Maryland comprise a large and critical segment of our future workforce. This is why I was proud to work with the leadership and staff of the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems this legislative session to ban the sale of extreme-strength "grain" alcohol.
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NEWS
April 13, 2010
Police crack down on Frostburg binge drinking Maryland State Police say they are joining local law enforcement in a springtime crackdown on binge drinking in Frostburg, home to Frostburg State University. Capt. James Pyles said the effort began Friday and will continue through the spring. Besides increased patrols and visibility, police say they are collecting and analyzing intelligence on house parties held by unrecognized fraternities that are little more than drinking clubs.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | July 10, 2014
Excessive drinking accounts for 10 percent of deaths among working-age adults, making it the leading cause of preventable death of Americans, according to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . The alcohol use killed about 88,000 people aged 20 to 64 a year from 2006 to 2010, shortening their lives by about 30 years. They died from health effects including breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease, as well as from violence, alcohol poisoning and car crashes.
NEWS
By Richard S. Madaleno Jr | August 4, 2014
Excessive drinking among college students is a public health problem that is larger than just the colleges and universities. It is a problem for our entire state. The more than 270,000 students attending college in Maryland comprise a large and critical segment of our future workforce. This is why I was proud to work with the leadership and staff of the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems this legislative session to ban the sale of extreme-strength "grain" alcohol.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 10, 2012
More than 38 million U.S. adults binge drink four times a month, more than previously thought, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention The reports says that young adults up to age 34 binge drink the most, but of the seniors who binge drink, they do more often, an average of five to six times a month. (Binge drinking is 5 or more drinks for men and 4 or more for women in a short amount of time.) It's most common in people who household income is over $75,000 but those with incomes of less than $25,000 drink the most per occasion.
NEWS
By SHARI ROAN and SHARI ROAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 12, 2006
In recounting her battles with alcohol, author Koren Zailckas doesn't skimp on the details - her first drink at the age of 14, the years of blackouts and hangovers, waking up in a strange man's apartment and, finally, her embrace of sobriety at the ripe old age of 22. Her story is notable because she crafted it into a best-selling book, Smashed: Story of a Drunken Girlhood, not because it's rare. Recent surveys suggest that today's girls and college-age women are abusing alcohol in ways not seen in previous generations - by binge drinking more often and at earlier ages.
NEWS
By Andrew Bard Schmookler | February 18, 1998
BROADWAY, Va. -- There's a limit to the ability of mere laws to fix our problems.Take the case of the state of Virginia, which is considering lowering the drinking age. Not because 18- to-20-year-olds have been so impressive in how responsibly they've been using alcohol, but for precisely the opposite reason. In recent months in the state, five alcohol-related deaths have been recorded among underage college students.Faulty premiseSo, why lower the legal age? The thinking is, so long as college students' consumption is illegal, their schools are barred from leading these young people toward wiser drinking habits.
NEWS
August 20, 2008
A number of respected academic leaders in Maryland believe the legal drinking age should be lowered from 21 to 18, to help confront what they describe as a hidden crisis in binge drinking among students. But they offer no convincing evidence that lowering the drinking age would reduce excessive alcohol use by college students. What we do know is that since 1984, when Congress effectively raised the national drinking age to 21, the number of young drivers charged with drunken driving has declined significantly, as has the number of alcohol-related highway deaths.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 5, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Not very long ago, Smokey Joe's, like a magnet, drew students to its horseshoe-shaped bar, with its wooden booths and photos of old University of Pennsylvania sports heroes. The beer flowed freely.Students from Penn, Drexel University, St. Joseph's University and other colleges still come to the bar, but these days they are just as likely to order a Coke as a pitcher of Bud. Call it the age of moderation."Most people don't drink much," said Larry Brooks, 20, a bartender at Smokey Joe's and a Penn junior from Miami.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Grain alcohol would be outlawed in Maryland under a bill that passed the House Thursday. The vote was 103-30. Similar legislation has already passed the Senate. It would bar retail sales of any drink that's 190-proof or more, containing at least 95 percent alcohol. The ban was sought by the state's university presidents, who were seeking to curb binge drinking on campus. Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia already ban grain alcohol.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
It is about time university presidents took an interest in college drinking ( "Grain alcohol target of ban," Feb. 6), but why target grain alcohol instead of college drinking? It has been allowed to go on for far too long and, as a '60s college graduate, I have always been appalled at the laxness on today's campuses. As I told my son when he was in college, you are an adult and get adult responsibilities and privileges when you can pay the bills and clean up the mistakes. And yes, as a parent I took responsibility for alcohol education, and at home he was allowed as a late teenager to "taste" the infrequent wine or beer when guests were there, and he was taught the dangers of irresponsible drinking.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
I have serious concerns about Douglas Gansler as a candidate for governor, but his beach-party picture scandal is not one of them ( "Gansler says he made 'a mistake,'" Oct. 24). The vitriol being spewed toward Mr. Gansler by readers is completely ridiculous. What gives these holier-than-thou individuals the right to scrutinize a public figure's personal parenting decision? The same people attacking Mr. Gansler for not shutting down a chaperoned party are probably failing as parents themselves.
NEWS
October 30, 2013
I'm getting quite tired of people criticizing Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler for not playing enforcer-in-chief and calling the police on his son and other teenagers drinking alcohol at a party ("RNC chairman: Gansler failed as a parent and a public official," Oct. 29). Americans are so immature. While binge drinking is always senseless and should never occur, our laws should allow teens to have alcoholic drinks in moderation. By watching responsible drinking, they'll learn responsible drinking.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's comments about how parents of daughters may respond differently to underage drinking drew a sharp rebuke Monday from a political rival.  Del. Heather Mizeur, like Gansler a Democrat from Montgomery County, issued a statement in response to The Baltimore Sun's report Sunday that Gansler said a parent's willingness to break up an underage party " also has to do with whether you have a boy or...
NEWS
April 18, 2013
Using zoning laws to limit alcohol outlet density won't stop the heaviest drinkers from consuming alcoholic beverages ("Government should use zoning to limit liquor stores, Hopkins researchers say," April 11). Such a solution oversimplifies the problem of alcohol abuse. Just compare Maryland and Pennsylvania. Despite its smaller population, Maryland's private control of alcohol sales means it has roughly 1.5 times as many alcohol retail outlets as government-controlled Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
Alcohol and drug use has declined in some categories among Carroll County students the past two years, but increases in other areas are cause for concern, school officials said."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1998
Western Maryland College almost lost a sophomore to alcohol poisoning last month, after a young woman drank more than 20 shots of bourbon in a competitive drinking bout, college officials said.The incident occurred at an unauthorized, unsupervised party in a fraternity clubroom on campus, officials said. The clubroom is in a dormitory."In my time here, there has never been such a serious, life-threatening situation," said Philip Sayre, now in his 15th year as dean of student affairs.The student was disciplined, and the local fraternity, Gamma Beta Chi, and local sorority Alpha Nu Omega have lost "virtually every privilege," Sayre confirmed yesterday.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Savannah Bass, 21, who grew up in Ruxton and graduated from Roland Park Country School in 2008, is working to curb binge drinking on college campuses and along the beach during spring break. As one of 13 University of Alabama students in charge of LessThanUThink, she is using a humorous approach to convey the message that excessive drinking can have unintended, even embarrassing consequences. "We found through research that students don't respond to messages that are negative," she said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2012
A Parkville High School senior donned a thick pair of what police call "drunk glasses. " As her classmates watched, she reeled, nearly stumbled and only missed hitting a pole because she had her hands outstretched. "It was crazy!" said Laura DeGuzman. "I couldn't see or focus. I couldn't tell where objects were. " The glasses, which simulate what it feels like to be legally drunk, were among the many props that Michael Gimbel, a substance abuse counselor, includes in his anti-drug presentations.
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