Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBiloxi
IN THE NEWS

Biloxi

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 2, 2005
BILOXI, Miss. - As they struggle back into town or strike out from their shelters to look for supplies, people born and raised here are learning the landscape again. Wandering beneath beheaded palm trees, they note Spanish mansions, and point out the drowned pier and upended pinball machines on the beach. They scavenge the remains of a tourist trap on Highway 90, targeting casino-themed Biloxi mugs as though their hometown were someplace they had never been before. And in a sense, it is. Residents here are as altered as their surroundings.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | April 15, 2006
BILOXI, Miss. -- In the shade of the oak tree her mother planted more than 50 years ago, Veronica Davis stood firm outside her small one-story house, which Hurricane Katrina nearly destroyed seven months ago and which she has no intention of leaving. Around the grounds, a team of volunteers from a Baltimore County church worked steadily, removing debris from the house, replacing damaged flooring, installing wiring and cleaning up the yard that once boasted lilies and a lemon tree. The group arrived a week ago to help make the house livable again.
Advertisement
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | April 15, 2006
BILOXI, Miss. -- In the shade of the oak tree her mother planted more than 50 years ago, Veronica Davis stood firm outside her small one-story house, which Hurricane Katrina nearly destroyed seven months ago and which she has no intention of leaving. Around the grounds, a team of volunteers from a Baltimore County church worked steadily, removing debris from the house, replacing damaged flooring, installing wiring and cleaning up the yard that once boasted lilies and a lemon tree. The group arrived a week ago to help make the house livable again.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 2, 2005
BILOXI, Miss. - As they struggle back into town or strike out from their shelters to look for supplies, people born and raised here are learning the landscape again. Wandering beneath beheaded palm trees, they note Spanish mansions, and point out the drowned pier and upended pinball machines on the beach. They scavenge the remains of a tourist trap on Highway 90, targeting casino-themed Biloxi mugs as though their hometown were someplace they had never been before. And in a sense, it is. Residents here are as altered as their surroundings.
NEWS
June 14, 2002
William Adolph Barq, 79, a third-generation president of Barq's Inc., maker of the nation's top-selling root beer, died of cardiac arrest Tuesday in Biloxi, Miss. In 1962, Mr. Barq took over as president of the family soft drink business. Barq's root beer was first bottled in 1898 in Biloxi by his grandfather, Edward C. Barq Sr., a sugar chemist by trade. In 1976, John Koerner and John Oudt acquired the company from the Barq family and moved the headquarters to New Orleans while the syrup continued to be made in Biloxi.
NEWS
July 9, 2003
On Monday, July 7, 2003, HARRY P. LITTLE, age 86 a resident of Diamondhead, MS. Mr. Little was a native of Baltimore, MD. He was the retired manager of Maryland Horse Racing Association. He served in the US Army, WWII. Mr Little is preceded in death by his parents, Harry G., and Marcie Pilson Little. He is survived by his wife E. Mae Little of Diamondhead, son Rex M. Little of Mobile, AL, daughter, Ann E. Kennedy of Columbia, MD, brother James K. Little of Towson, MD, sister Marjorie Schimp of Parkville, MD and five grandchildren.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
GULFPORT, Miss. - Breena Estorffe sat on her front porch near the beach, happy to escape the hot sun, and pondered which of her neighbors on 36th Avenue might be dead. The elderly woman down the block was seen stumbling around in the rubble that Hurricane Katrina left behind, and so were the people in the yellow house across the street. But other houses were reduced to splinters, and the pink apartment complex near the beach had vanished completely. The only movement there was of animals and rescue workers searching for survivors - or bodies.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano | July 23, 1991
Neil Simon could hardly go wrong setting "Biloxi Blues" in an Army boot camp during World War II. When young soldiers of various ethnic extractions are thrown together in a hot Mississippi barracks, they can be counted on to fight each other while training to fight the Germans. And between the mess hall and the latrine, there is no shortage of material for one-liners.But the one-liners aren't just facile insults in "Biloxi Blues." They are character based and come directly from Mr. Simon's own youthful experiences.
NEWS
By ELLEN BARRY and ELLEN BARRY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 27, 2005
BILOXI, MISS. -- In the afternoon, when it is warm, Valentina and Gary Stilwell can almost forget there are no walls around them. Valentina has hung one of her paintings on a tree, and there is a bowl of hard candies on the coffee table. The concrete slab beneath them is as spotless as linoleum. But on Sunday night a cold wind shuddered through east Biloxi, shaking their tent so badly that Gary had to get up several times to drive the stakes back into the ground. In the morning, the weight of what they had been through bore down hard.
NEWS
April 26, 1998
A Coast Guard C-130 transport plane had a rough landing at Baltimore-Washington International Airport last night after being diverted there because of smoke in the cockpit, authorities said.None of the 48 passengers and crew was injured.The airplane's right front main landing gear locked during the 6 p.m. landing, causing the tires to deflate, according to BWI spokeswoman Karen Black.The C-130 was on its way to Biloxi, Miss., from McGuire Air Force Base, N.J., when the crew noticed smoke in the cockpit.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2005
GULFPORT, Miss. - Breena Estorffe sat on her front porch near the beach, happy to escape the hot sun, and pondered which of her neighbors on 36th Avenue might be dead. The elderly woman down the block was seen stumbling around in the rubble that Hurricane Katrina left behind, and so were the people in the yellow house across the street. But other houses were reduced to splinters, and the pink apartment complex near the beach had vanished completely. The only movement there was of animals and rescue workers searching for survivors - or bodies.
NEWS
July 9, 2003
On Monday, July 7, 2003, HARRY P. LITTLE, age 86 a resident of Diamondhead, MS. Mr. Little was a native of Baltimore, MD. He was the retired manager of Maryland Horse Racing Association. He served in the US Army, WWII. Mr Little is preceded in death by his parents, Harry G., and Marcie Pilson Little. He is survived by his wife E. Mae Little of Diamondhead, son Rex M. Little of Mobile, AL, daughter, Ann E. Kennedy of Columbia, MD, brother James K. Little of Towson, MD, sister Marjorie Schimp of Parkville, MD and five grandchildren.
NEWS
June 14, 2002
William Adolph Barq, 79, a third-generation president of Barq's Inc., maker of the nation's top-selling root beer, died of cardiac arrest Tuesday in Biloxi, Miss. In 1962, Mr. Barq took over as president of the family soft drink business. Barq's root beer was first bottled in 1898 in Biloxi by his grandfather, Edward C. Barq Sr., a sugar chemist by trade. In 1976, John Koerner and John Oudt acquired the company from the Barq family and moved the headquarters to New Orleans while the syrup continued to be made in Biloxi.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano | July 23, 1991
Neil Simon could hardly go wrong setting "Biloxi Blues" in an Army boot camp during World War II. When young soldiers of various ethnic extractions are thrown together in a hot Mississippi barracks, they can be counted on to fight each other while training to fight the Germans. And between the mess hall and the latrine, there is no shortage of material for one-liners.But the one-liners aren't just facile insults in "Biloxi Blues." They are character based and come directly from Mr. Simon's own youthful experiences.
NEWS
February 23, 2005
ALLEN "BIG AL" CONRAD, 53, of Long Beach, MS., died Friday, February 18, 2005 in Long Beach, MS. Big Al was born in Baltimore, Maryland and had been a resident of the coast for 30 years. He was retired from the US Navy and was a Vietnam Veteran. He was a member of the VNV/MC. He was preceded in death by his father, Ernest Conrad. He is survived by his Ol' Lady, Gayl "Angel" Tracy of Long Beach; his mother and stepfather, Frances and Joseph Houston of Joppa, Maryland; his son, Richard Le Normand of Gulfport; his daughter, Michelle Conrad of Gulfport; his brother, Michael Conrad of Baltimore, Maryland; and three grandchildren.
NEWS
By JERRY JACKSON and JERRY JACKSON,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
Along 26 miles of coastal Highway 90 between Biloxi and Waveland on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, Katrina's devastation could be seen everywhere this month - countless steps leading to empty foundations. But, there was also something else - trees. Live oaks, many well over 100 years old, still stand, now shading FEMA trailers. These gangly giants are an enduring feature of the coast. They survived Katrina as they did Camille and dozens of other storms. In Ocean Springs, I came across a house that looked on the verge of collapse.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.