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SPORTS
April 7, 1999
(Tee times for tomorrow and Friday)8: 15 a.m. and 11: 11 a.m. -- Billy Casper, Gay Brewer and Doug Ford.8: 26 a.m. and 11: 22 a.m. -- Steve Pate, Scott Hoch and Bob Estes.8: 37 a.m. and 11: 33 a.m. -- John Daly, Gabriel Hjertstedt and Olin Browne.8: 48 a.m. and 11: 44 a.m. -- Sandy Lyle, Corey Pavin and Scott Verplank.8: 59 a.m. and 12: 06 p.m. -- Craig Stadler, Craig Parry and Rocco Mediate.9: 10 a.m. and 12: 06 p.m. -- Ray Floyd, Colin Montgomerie and Steve Jones.9: 21 a.m. and 12: 17 p.m. -- Jose Maria Olazabal, Bill Glasson and Brandel Chamblee.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By CHRIS LEE and CHRIS LEE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 16, 2006
Surfing the Web for new music, video and MP3 downloads can be a serious time investment. These picks from Los Angeles Times staff and contributors will help take the drag out of click-and-drag music choices. Some downloads may contain explicit lyrics. All are free, except as noted. "Thunder Road": Tortoise & Bonnie "Prince" Billy, itunes.com: In their deconstruction of Bruce Springsteen's 1975 signature anthem of longing and highway liberation, Billy (an alias of indie crooner Will Oldham)
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | October 19, 1993
LANDOVER -- They say that the biggest problem with being a rock-and-roll piano player is that the piano is not exactly a portable instrument. Unlike guitarists or singers, who can roam the stage at will, piano men (and women) are pretty much anchored behind their keyboard. Because who could possibly move a piano around?Billy Joel can.In fact, the set-up he brought to the U.S. Air Arena last night not only allowed him to spin his piano around like an hors d'oeuvre on a Lazy Susan, it let him transport his baby grand from the front of the stage to the back.
NEWS
By Caroline F. Campion and Caroline F. Campion,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 28, 2002
NEW YORK - Hidden within one of the most benign of New York establishments, the neighborhood deli, dwells a silent killer. Crouched beneath the ice cream freezer or curled in innocent repose between the aisles of condiments and canned soup, he waits patiently for his moment to pounce. Not only have many New Yorkers been face to face with this cunning deli dweller, some have been known to reach out a hand and, yes, rub the fiend behind the ear. The fiend in question is not insidious bacteria or even Steven Seagal.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Ken Murray and Milton Kent and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | March 14, 1991
COLLEGE PARK -- It should be old hat to an old pro like Len Elmore, but the former Maryland All-American center can't help feeling a little nostalgic every time he walks into Cole Field House."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | September 27, 2009
I was shuffling books around my library on a recent late summer Saturday afternoon and for some reason or other, paused and opened a somewhat faded blue volume. It was "The Letters of Alexander Woollcott," edited by Beatrice Kaufman and Joseph Hennessey, that had been riding around my shelves, unread, I might add, for years. The posthumous volume of correspondence of the noted anthologist, author, commentator, New Yorker contributor, radio celebrity, actor, celebrated snob both intellectual and otherwise, and perennial Algonquin "Round Table" wit, was published by Viking Press in 1944, a year after his unexpected death.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | November 8, 1990
Bill Hall never heard the words Agent Orange until his wife was pregnant with his second son, a full 10 years after he returned from service in Vietnam.He had never heard of the dioxin-based herbicide when his first son, Billy, showed the first signs of a degenerative neurological condition that would leave him paralyzed, blind and confined to his bed or wheelchair -- totally dependent on the care of others.When his wife, Alice, became pregnant again, he started hearing news reports about Vietnam veterans who suffered from cancer and other diseases and blamed Agent Orange -- a chemical sprayed from planes to clear forests and expose the enemy.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Even as kids, born four years apart, Cal and Bill Ripken played on the same team. Cal always worked it out that way.The neighborhood gang would gather to play football or baseball or whatever the sport of choice happened to be, and Cal, possessing some athletic pre-eminence, would be picked to be captain of one team. Sometimes he bartered for his brother -- You take that guy, I'll take Billy -- and sometimes he picked him first, straight away.But always, they played together, Cal figuring that even if Bill wasn't as big as the other, older guys or as strong or as fast, he would find a way to win. Winning is what Cal cared about, and as far as he was concerned, Bill wasn't a pesty little brother.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
All the postseason math - all the talk of magic numbers and scoreboard watching - is now a thing of the past. Just one win now separates the Orioles and their first American League East division title since 1997. Opening up their three-game series with the second-place Toronto Blue Jays on Monday night at Camden Yards, the Orioles' path to the postseason was simple: Win two of the games and punch a ticket to the playoffs. And the Orioles took one humongous step Monday toward winning the division with their 5-2 win over Toronto, giving the club an opportunity to clinch a division title with a win Tuesday.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
RAVENS PASSING GAME: In the victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers, Joe Flacco played safe and efficient football. Expect more of the same as the Ravens want him to avoid the slow starts that plagued him on the road last year. Steve Smith and the two tight ends have been extremely productive, but the Ravens need to get Torrey Smith, Jacoby Jones and Marlon Brown more involved. Smith will probably draw Joe Haden, the Browns' top corner. Steve Smith has been targeted 25 times in two games.
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