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Billy The Kid

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By Stephen Wigler | March 20, 1997
One of the most important musical premieres taking place in Baltimore this season is a coming performance in Meyerhoff Hall by the celebrated British a cappella vocal ensemble the King's Singers, with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society, of a new work by distinguished American composer Libby Larsen.Larsen was jointly commissioned by the King's Singers, the BCAS and the City of Birmingham Symphony Chorus to write a piece based on an extended prose poem by Michael Ondaatje (the author of the Booker Award-winning novel "The English Patient")
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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2008
You could say William J. "Billy the Kid" Johnson's style is a knockout. Literally. The Baltimore native is a professional super middle-weight boxer. But that's only one of several hats he wears. Johnson manages the local offices for Velocity Express, which makes deliveries for NeighborCare pharmacies, and he owns B-Quick Bail Bonds. On top of all that, Johnson is one of the top players in the World Poker Tour Amateur Poker League; he's trying for a seat at the World Series of Poker. When we caught up with him, he was practicing in the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore Hotel ballroom during the American Lung Association's Casino Night.
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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1997
Libby Larsen, being a creative composer of serious modern music, has a lot of preoccupations. Among them are heroes: "How we define them. How we pick heroes."Another is violence, or what she describes as Americans' "love-hate" response to it.Which explains why she has written a piece of music about Billy the Kid. He was violent, after all. And a hero of sorts, or a romantic legend, at least to some: violent people, perhaps, or those fascinated by violence, or trying to understand it.Violence perplexes Larsen.
NEWS
By JANET MASLIN and JANET MASLIN,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2006
Bob Dylan: The Essential Interviews Edited by Jonathan Cott The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia Michael Gray Continuum / 832 pages / $40 Bob Dylan turned 65 on Wednesday, which probably prompted an entire generation of baby boomers to ruefully hum "Forever Young" while mourning their own passage to the far end of middle age. This much is certain: Dylan would hate hearing about it. "It's horrible," he told Playboy 40 years ago, on one of the numerous occasions...
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 8, 2004
FORT SUMNER, N.M. -- It's a classic Old West showdown, a ruckus involving righteous sheriffs and brazen outlaws, but with a modern-day twist: The weapons are not six-shooters but DNA samples. Billy the Kid is being raised from the dead, figuratively and maybe even literally. A group of lawmen in New Mexico, with the support of the governor, is seeking to exhume long-buried bodies to resolve a running dispute over Billy the Kid, the young-gun outlaw who, most historians and countless books, movies and songs agree, was shot dead here in 1881 by Sheriff Pat Garrett.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 20, 1993
They will make movies about him. Dontay Carter is the Billy the Kid of his era.The mayors of this nation have so little clout with the new crowd in Washington, they had to party in Baltimore.At last we have a Hoya for president.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1997
Musical magic was in great supply Saturday evening at the Meyerhoff with the King's Singers. Only the King's Singers could present Renaissance madrigals and British folk songs with the Beatles, Beach Boys and Bobby McFerrin and a highly demanding contemporary work with such ease and panache.This is one of the few groups whose live performances are much more vivid than their large and splendid recorded repertoire.The motet "Ave Virgo" by the Belgium composer Adrian Willaert impressively began the evening.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 16, 1993
Joaquin Rodrigo's somewhat awkwardly named "Concierto de Aranjuez" for guitar and orchestra is one of the most graceful and attractive concert pieces of this century. It is hard to imagine it played better than it was last night in Meyerhoff Hall by guitarist Manuel Barrueco and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and conductor David Zinman.Barrueco, who teaches at the Peabody Conservatory and who is much admired by connoisseurs of his instrument, played the piece with freedom and idiomatic mastery (the piece's flamenco associations were unmistakably underlined without being overdone)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 28, 1991
A. B. Guthrie Jr., a Kentucky journalist who turned to fiction and won a Pulitzer Prize as one of the century's leading Western historical novelists, died Friday at his home at Choteau, Mont. He was 90.Carl D. Brandt, his agent, said he died of lung failure. He had been in poor health for several months.Mr. Guthrie, who won the Pulitzer in 1949 for his novel "The Way West," also wrote the screenplay for the 1953 motion picture "Shane."His final book, "A Field Guide to Writing Fiction," was published two weeks ago. His published works consisted of six novels, a book of essays, a children's book, a book of poems and five mystery novels.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 13, 1999
To Americans, there is no personality trait more noble or admirable than rugged individualism.Other cultures may prize conformity and warn that the nail that sticks out gets hammered down, but here in the U.S. of A., we value those who march to the beat of a different drummer. We see the ability to stand one's ground as a true test of moral fiber.Tom Petty is a case in point. Not only has he maintained a remarkably unique voice as a musician, resisting the tides of fashion and answering only to his own muse, but he takes an equally uncompromising stance toward the business side of rock and roll.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 8, 2004
FORT SUMNER, N.M. -- It's a classic Old West showdown, a ruckus involving righteous sheriffs and brazen outlaws, but with a modern-day twist: The weapons are not six-shooters but DNA samples. Billy the Kid is being raised from the dead, figuratively and maybe even literally. A group of lawmen in New Mexico, with the support of the governor, is seeking to exhume long-buried bodies to resolve a running dispute over Billy the Kid, the young-gun outlaw who, most historians and countless books, movies and songs agree, was shot dead here in 1881 by Sheriff Pat Garrett.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 13, 1999
To Americans, there is no personality trait more noble or admirable than rugged individualism.Other cultures may prize conformity and warn that the nail that sticks out gets hammered down, but here in the U.S. of A., we value those who march to the beat of a different drummer. We see the ability to stand one's ground as a true test of moral fiber.Tom Petty is a case in point. Not only has he maintained a remarkably unique voice as a musician, resisting the tides of fashion and answering only to his own muse, but he takes an equally uncompromising stance toward the business side of rock and roll.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1997
Musical magic was in great supply Saturday evening at the Meyerhoff with the King's Singers. Only the King's Singers could present Renaissance madrigals and British folk songs with the Beatles, Beach Boys and Bobby McFerrin and a highly demanding contemporary work with such ease and panache.This is one of the few groups whose live performances are much more vivid than their large and splendid recorded repertoire.The motet "Ave Virgo" by the Belgium composer Adrian Willaert impressively began the evening.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1997
Libby Larsen, being a creative composer of serious modern music, has a lot of preoccupations. Among them are heroes: "How we define them. How we pick heroes."Another is violence, or what she describes as Americans' "love-hate" response to it.Which explains why she has written a piece of music about Billy the Kid. He was violent, after all. And a hero of sorts, or a romantic legend, at least to some: violent people, perhaps, or those fascinated by violence, or trying to understand it.Violence perplexes Larsen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | March 20, 1997
One of the most important musical premieres taking place in Baltimore this season is a coming performance in Meyerhoff Hall by the celebrated British a cappella vocal ensemble the King's Singers, with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society, of a new work by distinguished American composer Libby Larsen.Larsen was jointly commissioned by the King's Singers, the BCAS and the City of Birmingham Symphony Chorus to write a piece based on an extended prose poem by Michael Ondaatje (the author of the Booker Award-winning novel "The English Patient")
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 20, 1993
They will make movies about him. Dontay Carter is the Billy the Kid of his era.The mayors of this nation have so little clout with the new crowd in Washington, they had to party in Baltimore.At last we have a Hoya for president.
FEATURES
By Carey Quan Gelernter and Carey Quan Gelernter,Seattle Times | October 10, 1990
"Lonesome Dove." "The Last Picture Show." "Terms of Endearment." "Horseman, Pass By." "Texasville."If you're not a reader, you may know these books' author through the movies and television versions. ("Horseman" became "Hud").Of course, the books were better.Larry McMurtry was in Seattle, not incidentally, to lecture in conjunction with the Henry Art Gallery's "Myth of the West" exhibit.A fitting choice for speaker.Nearly all McMurtry's books are rooted in the American West -- whether its characters are confused youth unsure of a place in a changing Texas ("Moving On")
NEWS
By JANET MASLIN and JANET MASLIN,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2006
Bob Dylan: The Essential Interviews Edited by Jonathan Cott The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia Michael Gray Continuum / 832 pages / $40 Bob Dylan turned 65 on Wednesday, which probably prompted an entire generation of baby boomers to ruefully hum "Forever Young" while mourning their own passage to the far end of middle age. This much is certain: Dylan would hate hearing about it. "It's horrible," he told Playboy 40 years ago, on one of the numerous occasions...
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 16, 1993
Joaquin Rodrigo's somewhat awkwardly named "Concierto de Aranjuez" for guitar and orchestra is one of the most graceful and attractive concert pieces of this century. It is hard to imagine it played better than it was last night in Meyerhoff Hall by guitarist Manuel Barrueco and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and conductor David Zinman.Barrueco, who teaches at the Peabody Conservatory and who is much admired by connoisseurs of his instrument, played the piece with freedom and idiomatic mastery (the piece's flamenco associations were unmistakably underlined without being overdone)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 28, 1991
A. B. Guthrie Jr., a Kentucky journalist who turned to fiction and won a Pulitzer Prize as one of the century's leading Western historical novelists, died Friday at his home at Choteau, Mont. He was 90.Carl D. Brandt, his agent, said he died of lung failure. He had been in poor health for several months.Mr. Guthrie, who won the Pulitzer in 1949 for his novel "The Way West," also wrote the screenplay for the 1953 motion picture "Shane."His final book, "A Field Guide to Writing Fiction," was published two weeks ago. His published works consisted of six novels, a book of essays, a children's book, a book of poems and five mystery novels.
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