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Billy Murphy

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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Reporter | June 15, 2008
Arthur W. Murphy, a pioneering election consultant and campaign manager who was a member of one of Baltimore's most prominent political families, has died of complications from multiple sclerosis. He was 57. Mr. Murphy, the brother of former Baltimore mayoral candidate and leading defense lawyer William H. "Billy" Murphy Jr., died Friday night at Lorien Mays Chapel hospice in Timonium after a long struggle with the disease. Family members said the lifelong Baltimore resident continued to follow politics to the very end, listening to his favorite cable news shows on MSNBC even after he lost his eyesight.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 15, 2013
It's a troubling and scary thing to consider, but my take-away from the trial of George Zimmerman is a very clear message that you can take up arms to protect yourself and use deadly force with the thinnest claims of self-defense and the fullest confidence that little, if anything, will happen to you. This will undoubtedly be true in about half of the country - in states that have enacted stand-your-ground laws in recent years. (Maryland is not one of them, yet.) Self-defense is a powerful defense, but in Florida and nearly two dozen other states.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 24, 2006
Attorney Billy Murphy is a smart and interesting man, and it's too bad he's not running for public office again. Twenty-three years ago, I covered his campaign for mayor of Baltimore, and at every stop, in churches and street rallies, he was an inspirational and provocative speaker - probably, next to Bill Clinton, the best I ever heard on the trail. In 1980, Murphy had run for a seat on the Baltimore Circuit Court and won. He served three years on the bench before becoming bored and deciding he should be mayor.
NEWS
October 21, 2010
The third and perhaps final debate between Gov. Martin O'Malley and former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. ended without any knockout blows. Both men argued their positions well on health care, education, economic development and other issues. Even the stylistic differences between the more improvisational Mr. Ehrlich and the more focused Mr. O'Malley were muted in this debate compared to their previous two. This one will likely go down as a Rorschach test — if you tend to agree with Mr. Ehrlich, you'll think he won, and if you tend to agree with Mr. O'Malley, you'll think he did. But given the setting, Mr. Ehrlich needed to come away with a lot more than that.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2006
The Maryland Democratic Party yesterday denounced a comment made this week by an ally of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s re-election campaign that compared the tactics of Baltimore police officers with Nazis. Democratic Party Chairman Terry Lierman demanded that Ehrlich disavow the comment made Thursday by Baltimore attorney William H. "Billy" Murphy Jr. on a WBAL-AM radio talk show conversation with host Chip Franklin and Sun columnist Dan Rodricks. During the discussion about Baltimore police arrest policies, Rodricks said that tough policing has been partially responsible for persuading some unemployed city residents to get off the streets and find a job. "You can not discount how this effort has impressed some folks into ... trying to do the right thing and get off the streets," Rodricks said.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 1, 2006
Back in January, Mayor Martin O'Malley and police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm went to the War Memorial Building for a public meeting on crime and policing that turned raucous and defiant. Comments from the crowd put O'Malley and Hamm squarely between the rock and a hard place: Some citizens complained that they've been abused by aggressive police tactics, while others said the city needs to do more to fight crime. Since Baltimoreans eager to see crime reduction made him mayor in 1999, O'Malley has been hearing complaints that his aggressive zero-tolerance police strategies, influenced by Rudy Giuliani's tenure as mayor of New York City, have led to thousands of bad arrests and stop-and-frisks that jailed or intimidated law-abiding citizens.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 24, 2008
An acclaimed HBO series that tells the story of Baltimore with brutal murders and f-bombs aplenty has spared viewers this much: Billy Murphy's legal fees. The Baltimore attorney played himself on The Wire last week. When it came time for Murphy to talk money with his fictional client, the famously realistic show actually pulled a punch. "If you want Billy Murphy to represent you, you gotta pay to put him there," Murphy says on the show.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 20, 1999
YEAH, I KNOW: The legendary Johnnie Cochran came to Baltimore, and now he, Billy Murphy and Dwight Pettit are teaming up to represent the family of the late Lawrence "Fat Herb" Hubbard, shot in the back of the head by a cop and memorialized as a martyr. Big story. A racial and political bonfire. "Mr. Cochran," Murphy said, "is here to heal."Maybe Mr. Cochran would like to volunteer at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.At least 15 people were shot, one fatally, over the weekend in the city that bleeds.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
Baltimore defense lawyer William H. "Billy" Murphy, Jr., has gotten many clients off in tough cases. But he spent yesterday in the dock himself -- and successfully fought off a career-damaging charge of contempt for failing to appear at a specially scheduled trial Jan. 25 in Essex District Court.With the help of vigorous arguments by his law partner, M. Cristina Gutierrez, who acted as his attorney, Mr. Murphy won acquittal with his testimony that he had received no notice of the trial. He also produced office scheduling records to back up his claim.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | January 17, 1995
Flamboyant criminal defense lawyers William H. "Billy" Murphy Jr. and M. Cristina Gutierrez have parted ways after years of sharing controversy and high-profile clients.The long-rumored professional split became official yesterday, when receptionists began answering the phone "Murphy and Associates" at the partners' Calvert Street office, and Ms. Gutierrez completed the task of moving into the downtown firm of Redmond, Burgin & Cruz, where she will have a limited affiliation.Ms. Gutierrez, a divorced mother of two, called the breakup "amicable" and said that she was hoping to better control her workload and spend more time with her family.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 27, 2010
I don't know where Harry Calloway is these days. But five summers ago, when I first met him, Harry was a recovering heroin user/dealer trying to do the right thing. He'd pulled out of the drug scene that had nearly cost him his life — he'd survived nine bullets to the face and body as he walked out of a late-night club in 1998 — and he had enrolled in a culinary training class by day and college courses by night. Then came ArrestFest, and Harry ended up back in jail.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Reporter | June 15, 2008
Arthur W. Murphy, a pioneering election consultant and campaign manager who was a member of one of Baltimore's most prominent political families, has died of complications from multiple sclerosis. He was 57. Mr. Murphy, the brother of former Baltimore mayoral candidate and leading defense lawyer William H. "Billy" Murphy Jr., died Friday night at Lorien Mays Chapel hospice in Timonium after a long struggle with the disease. Family members said the lifelong Baltimore resident continued to follow politics to the very end, listening to his favorite cable news shows on MSNBC even after he lost his eyesight.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 24, 2008
An acclaimed HBO series that tells the story of Baltimore with brutal murders and f-bombs aplenty has spared viewers this much: Billy Murphy's legal fees. The Baltimore attorney played himself on The Wire last week. When it came time for Murphy to talk money with his fictional client, the famously realistic show actually pulled a punch. "If you want Billy Murphy to represent you, you gotta pay to put him there," Murphy says on the show.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | October 9, 2006
It's a Thursday afternoon and William H. "Billy" Murphy Jr., as is often the case, seems to be doing 10 things at once. The phone rings. And he's spouting off about Mayor Martin O'Malley's response to a radio ad in which Murphy is featured, accusing the Baltimore Police Department of unlawfully arresting thousands of black residents. Murphy paces. "Did you hear what O'Malley said today?" he booms incredulously into the phone. "He said that Governor Ehrlich was lying about this! He didn't say disagreeing.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 1, 2006
Back in January, Mayor Martin O'Malley and police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm went to the War Memorial Building for a public meeting on crime and policing that turned raucous and defiant. Comments from the crowd put O'Malley and Hamm squarely between the rock and a hard place: Some citizens complained that they've been abused by aggressive police tactics, while others said the city needs to do more to fight crime. Since Baltimoreans eager to see crime reduction made him mayor in 1999, O'Malley has been hearing complaints that his aggressive zero-tolerance police strategies, influenced by Rudy Giuliani's tenure as mayor of New York City, have led to thousands of bad arrests and stop-and-frisks that jailed or intimidated law-abiding citizens.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2006
The Maryland Democratic Party yesterday denounced a comment made this week by an ally of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s re-election campaign that compared the tactics of Baltimore police officers with Nazis. Democratic Party Chairman Terry Lierman demanded that Ehrlich disavow the comment made Thursday by Baltimore attorney William H. "Billy" Murphy Jr. on a WBAL-AM radio talk show conversation with host Chip Franklin and Sun columnist Dan Rodricks. During the discussion about Baltimore police arrest policies, Rodricks said that tough policing has been partially responsible for persuading some unemployed city residents to get off the streets and find a job. "You can not discount how this effort has impressed some folks into ... trying to do the right thing and get off the streets," Rodricks said.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 6, 1996
When Charles A. Hopkins hobbled into that criminal courtroom two decades ago, some stunning cosmic joke seemed to have been played by those who create our municipal monsters: The defendant was smaller than his own newspaper headlines.Finally, here was the City Hall gunman who failed to find William Donald Schaefer but settled on standby victims. Without his gun, without his murderous rage, without the headlines that had bannered his name since the attack of April 13, 1976, this was what remained: a puny, pathetic runt who'd been shot himself during the attack, whose body was now bent grotesquely into the shape of a question mark as he gimped his way across a room.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | October 9, 2006
It's a Thursday afternoon and William H. "Billy" Murphy Jr., as is often the case, seems to be doing 10 things at once. The phone rings. And he's spouting off about Mayor Martin O'Malley's response to a radio ad in which Murphy is featured, accusing the Baltimore Police Department of unlawfully arresting thousands of black residents. Murphy paces. "Did you hear what O'Malley said today?" he booms incredulously into the phone. "He said that Governor Ehrlich was lying about this! He didn't say disagreeing.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 24, 2006
Attorney Billy Murphy is a smart and interesting man, and it's too bad he's not running for public office again. Twenty-three years ago, I covered his campaign for mayor of Baltimore, and at every stop, in churches and street rallies, he was an inspirational and provocative speaker - probably, next to Bill Clinton, the best I ever heard on the trail. In 1980, Murphy had run for a seat on the Baltimore Circuit Court and won. He served three years on the bench before becoming bored and deciding he should be mayor.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 20, 1999
YEAH, I KNOW: The legendary Johnnie Cochran came to Baltimore, and now he, Billy Murphy and Dwight Pettit are teaming up to represent the family of the late Lawrence "Fat Herb" Hubbard, shot in the back of the head by a cop and memorialized as a martyr. Big story. A racial and political bonfire. "Mr. Cochran," Murphy said, "is here to heal."Maybe Mr. Cochran would like to volunteer at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.At least 15 people were shot, one fatally, over the weekend in the city that bleeds.
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