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NEWS
March 21, 2004
On March 18, 2004, BILLY DAVID DINGUS; beloved husband of Mary Josephine Dingus (nee Cirri); devoted father of Mary Tuller, Judy Buddemeyer, Diane Steimetz, Barbara Gallagher, James Clay, David Clay and Billy, Theresa, Margie, Steve, Sandy and the late Ricky. He is also survived by numerous grand and great-grandchildren. Relatives and friends are invited to call at the Schimunek Funeral Home, Inc., 9705 Belair Road (Perry Hall), on Tuesday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., where Funeral Service will be held Wednesday at 9 A.M. Interment Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Lori Sears and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
The true mettle and value of a musician is how naturally he can perform live. And on stage, Billy Joel is one of pop music's best, a seasoned veteran who's genuine, at ease and funny. There are no elaborate dance numbers, no over-the-top sets, no trickery, explosions or guitar-smashings. It's just Billy and his top-notch, eight-member band on a simple but classy set -- with large video screens and color lighting ... and 20-plus classic rock/pop songs that have made up the soundtrack of many lives.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 21, 1994
Early in Robert Leland Taylor's "Billy Would've Been 30 Today," the character of Gladys displays a painting she commissioned depicting how her son Billy, who died at age 5, would look today, 25 years later.But this Baltimore Playwrights Festival entry is less about a little boy denied the chance to grow up than it is about how his death has stunted the growth of his family.Yes, this is yet another example of the tried-and-true American theatrical genre of the dysfunctional family. But Taylor's writing -- combined with TraceyAnn Tokar Smith's direction -- is sensitive enough to make this a memorable production.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | July 7, 2014
Former Navy star Billy Hurley III , who had a two-shot lead after three rounds in the Greenbrier Classic, shot a 3-over-par 73 in the final round Sunday and fell to a seven-way tie for fourth at 9-under 271. Hurley took the lead in the second round and shot a 3-under 67 in the third round to extend his lead over Argentina's Angel Cabrera . But Hurley bogeyed four of the first six holes in the final round to fall out of contention for his first...
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
William "Billy" Neal, a former West Baltimore tavern owner and carwash proprietor who often claimed that cars always "seemed to run better" after he washed and waxed them, died Tuesday of heart failure while visiting relatives in New Jersey.Mr. Neal, 74, of West Baltimore owned Billy's Best Cars -- a one-man operation run out of a converted, cluttered garage near Riggs Avenue and Stricker Street in Upton.Mr. Neal owned the carwash from the late 1970s until about two years ago, friends said, then began a carwash and detail business that went to motorists' homes to service their cars.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | October 26, 1992
MOSCOW -- After more than 70 years of worshiping Marx and Lenin, the people of the former Soviet Union are desperately trying to find replacements for their fallen idols.Whether he loved or loathed communism, the average person was left by its collapse with a deep emptiness inside. Politicians, economists and religious leaders have all tried to offer new reasons to get up every morning and go to work.None is as highly organized or as well-financed as the Rev. Billy Graham, who this weekend preached to perhaps 100,000 people in Moscow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,sun staff | March 14, 1999
Billy Madonna's talking again. He shouldn't -- his lawyer objects -- but that's like telling Billy not to breathe. "I'm a talker," he explains, then shrugs.Billy's a good talker. He's charming, he's solicitous, he's gregarious -- everyone calls him Billy -- and he gives you his full attention. As he talks, he has this disarming habit of gently nudging your hand, your arm, your shoulder, as if he can gain credibility through touch.Billy has talked to get votes for himself and his favorite Baltimore politicians.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 17, 1993
ESSEN, Germany -- Starting tonight in a small hall in the heart of the Ruhr Valley, the Rev. Billy Graham begins what some believe is his last great crusade.Slowed by the rush of years and onset of Parkinson's disease, which grips him more than he publicly lets on, Mr. Graham is no longer the fire-breathing preacher who first wowed the world 45 years ago.Instead, he is a silver-haired evangelist whose hands often shake, whose time and energy are conserved by conscientious aides, and whose ministry continues along a dramatic new course this week in Germany.
SPORTS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 22, 1997
The kid who was told he was too small to play professional soccer still is in uniform, and in his element. Like the famous battery-driven rabbit, Billy Ronson keeps going and going.Ronson, who turns 40 today, continues to make his early detractors eat their words. And while he says that isn't his motivation for playing professionally for the past 25 years, Ronson admits that the diminutive boy from England who turned pro at 15 probably would have gotten a kick out of it."I've had a great life, living and playing soccer all over America, but I've had to work hard for it," said Ronson, who will be in uniform Saturday night when the Baltimore Bays play host to the Delaware Wizards at Du Burns Arena.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 5, 2001
Billy Joel's debut on disc as a classical composer is apt to leave you in a Chopin state of mind. Not to mention Liszt, Schumann and, for a minute, Bach. As for Joel, this just-released recording -Fantasies and Delusions: Music for Solo Piano (Sony Classical CK 85397) - doesn't offer much of a clue. If he has a truly original musical idea in his head, he isn't sharing it here. When Joel, one of pop music's leading lights, announced years ago that he was heading into the classical realm (his last pop record was in 1993)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
What we have in "Tribes," the agitated and absorbing play by Nina Raine receiving its Baltimore premiere at Everyman Theatre, isn't a failure to communicate. It's a stubborn, even proud, refusal to communicate. While four members of a well-educated London family speak over and through one another, wounding and goading as they go, the fifth does what he can to keep up, to fit in, or just stay out of the way. He's Billy, the youngest child, born deaf into a hearing family - not a listening family, mind you, just a hearing one. Billy's parents reason that their son is better off not being defined by his deafness, not being assimilated into the deaf community, which would only make him feel more handicapped.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Many a play deals with language and communication. There is always theatrical ore to be mined in the way people express themselves - or fail to - and how that can complicate so many things in life. British playwright Nina Raine gives the subject an unusual spin in "Tribes," a 2010 work about a young deaf man named Billy, born into a hearing family full of people who communicate all too crassly or ineptly with one another. This funny and touching play, which Everyman Theatre is staging for its season-closing production, features an actor deeply familiar with its central issues.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
In five years with the Jacksonville Jaguars, left tackle Eugene Monroe never experienced a winning season. Over his last 20 games played, he's celebrated just two victories. So when Monroe walked to the Ravens' indoor practice facility Thursday and spotted the giant banner of the Lombardi Trophy that hangs from the far wall, a whirlwind couple of days came into focus. "Coming to a situation like this where they're winning is unique," Monroe said after participating in the Ravens' morning walk-through.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
For the first time since he was beaten out by Justin Tucker last year for the kicking job, former Ravens kicker Billy Cundiff will return to M&T Bank Stadium for a regular season game Sunday. Cundiff was signed by the Cleveland Browns as the replacement for Phil Dawson after they cut Shayne Graham during the final major roster cutdown. Cundiff was a Pro Bowl selection in 2010 with the Ravens, but faltered during the 2011 season as his infamous rushed 32-yard field goal missed badly during the final moments of an AFC championship game loss to the New England Patriots.
SPORTS
By Seth Boster and The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
It's more of a faraway vision to Billy Cosh now: at the end of a country road, Arundel's football field, the quarterback's canvas under the hazy white glow of a Friday night. That was where the state of Maryland's all-time leading passer painted his legacy and where possibilities seemed as limitless as the magic from his right arm. "I miss it, you know?" said the 21-year-old Cosh, a 2009 Arundel graduate now on scholarship at the University of Houston with two years of eligibility remaining.
NEWS
August 19, 2013
Between Egypt and disgraced politicians, August has proven itself a more robust month for news than usual this year, yet there's always room in the summer doldrums for the wacky and off-beat. And for generations, few individuals have proven themselves better suited to provide that brand of comic relief than the men who have served as Maryland's comptroller. Whether it was Louis L. Goldstein's tireless campaigning or his cheerful but grammatically-challenged signature send-off, "God bless y'all real good," or even William Donald Schaefer's diatribes against the world or generally bizarre behavior, Maryland comptrollers have a tradition of quirky entertainment.
FEATURES
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2001
the prosecutor called his star witness to the stand.P Charlie Wilhelm, flanked by FBI agents, rose from his seat in the back of the cramped Towson courtroom. Dressed in a crisp business suit, his graying hair neatly trimmed, Charlie wore a resolute expression that belied his fear and exhaustion. This was the day -- Oct. 30, 1997 -- he had dreaded for more than two years, the day he would face his best friend in court and accuse him of murder. Charlie's decision to end his own life of crime and become an FBI informant had brought him to this moment.
SPORTS
November 4, 1999
BaseballCardinals: Declined to exercise 2000 options on P Donovan Osborne and OF Darren Bragg.Cubs: Named Billy Williams first base coach.Devil Rays: Promoted Frank Howard from bench coach to senior adviser for baseball operations.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 15, 2013
It's a troubling and scary thing to consider, but my take-away from the trial of George Zimmerman is a very clear message that you can take up arms to protect yourself and use deadly force with the thinnest claims of self-defense and the fullest confidence that little, if anything, will happen to you. This will undoubtedly be true in about half of the country - in states that have enacted stand-your-ground laws in recent years. (Maryland is not one of them, yet.) Self-defense is a powerful defense, but in Florida and nearly two dozen other states.
EXPLORE
May 15, 2013
Michael and Sharon Heimberger, of Perryville announce the engagement of their daughter, Sarah Renee, to John William "Billy" Lamana, son of Lisa Archer Karmel of Bel Air. Heimberger is a graduate of Lynchburg College and works for Cecil County Public Schools. Lamana is a graduate of Havre de Grace High School and is employed at the Harford County Emergency Operations Center. He is also a lieutenant of the Susquehanna Hose Company. A May 2014 wedding is planned.
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