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By Robert B. Reich | December 26, 2012
What's the biggest political lesson of 2012? Some say it's that money doesn't count all that much. Even though billionaires and big corporations poured huge amounts into the 2012 election, they lost big. They learned the lesson and won't try to buy another election. Baloney. It's true their political investments didn't exactly pay off this time around. Republican operative Karl Rove's two giant political funds -- American Crossroads (a super PAC) and Crossroads Grassroots Policy Strategies (a so-called nonprofit "social welfare organization" that doesn't have to report its donors)
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NEWS
June 2, 2014
I can't speak to Majority Leader Harry Reid's worth or wealth, but I am confused as to why my father is mentioned in Lyle Rescott's recent letter complaining about rich socialism backers ( "A narrow view of money and politics," May 29). Saul Alinsky's yearly salary at the time of his death was $25,000. Hardly a princely sum. He owned no stocks, his life insurance policy was the totality of his estate. He owned an 8-year-old Chevy and we lived in a rented apartment. I guess the mention of his name is just included as a "dog whistle" for those who need a boogie man to convince them of evil.
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NEWS
June 2, 2014
I can't speak to Majority Leader Harry Reid's worth or wealth, but I am confused as to why my father is mentioned in Lyle Rescott's recent letter complaining about rich socialism backers ( "A narrow view of money and politics," May 29). Saul Alinsky's yearly salary at the time of his death was $25,000. Hardly a princely sum. He owned no stocks, his life insurance policy was the totality of his estate. He owned an 8-year-old Chevy and we lived in a rented apartment. I guess the mention of his name is just included as a "dog whistle" for those who need a boogie man to convince them of evil.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The one thing billionaires and their special interest groups are counting on is voter apathy ( "A win for the billionaires," April 4). If they can keep the electorate focused on their personal agendas and cynical about politics, they can buy elections and get legislation passed that serves their interests to the detriment of the rest of the country. But the one thing that scares them is an educated electorate that turns out to vote. Voter turnout will always trump big money. I completely agree on the need for a constitutional convention that would affirm the right of every citizen to vote, limit the influence of big money and refuse to recognize corporations as people.
NEWS
By Tom Matthews | June 28, 2007
It's come to this: The best hope for this grand experiment in democracy may hinge on the right billionaire coming along to buy his way into the White House. Now that we have made fundraising the benchmark against which all conventional campaigns are measured; now that it has become a requirement that big-pocketed special interests subsidize the elections of politicians who will be beholden to them; now that modestly funded, perhaps massively talented Americans need not even bother to aspire to the job (Headline from 2013 we will never see: "President Vilsack Saves Social Security, Declares Peace In Middle East")
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 25, 1998
Mohamed Al Fayed, the father of Dodi Fayed who was killed with Princess Diana in an automobile crash in Paris in 1997, is being treated for an unspecified illness at Johns Hopkins Hospital, a hospital spokeswoman said early today."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 16, 2000
A 35-year-old software billionaire said yesterday that he would spend $100 million to realize his vision of 21st century higher education: a giant free Web site that would provide access to what he calls the "10,000 greatest minds of our time," in lectures and interviews recorded for the venture. Michael Saylor, the chief executive of Microstrategy, a technology company in Northern Virginia, said that his goal was "free education for everyone on Earth, forever." And he envisions his institution eventually granting degrees in countless disciplines, based on final exams that would be administered once a month in convention halls around the world, with grading done by computer whenever possible.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 6, 1993
WASHINGTON -- There are some obvious risks in the White House decision to allow Vice President Al Gore to meet Ross Perot in a debate over the North American Free Trade Agreement.There are also less obvious but equally compelling reasons why this chancy change in policy toward the Texas billionaire could pay rich political dividends for President Clinton for the rest of his time in the White House.Perot has been sniping at Clinton with increasing frequency and acidity ever since the election in which he compiled 19 percent of the vote as an independent -- at one point suggesting that the president was trying to go to war in Bosnia to divert attention from intractable domestic problems.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 18, 2004
KURALOVO, Russia - As he trudged along a path at an orphanage, the pensioner was pelted by hail. His face and hands trembled, the result of Parkinson's disease. But he walked with his shoulders back - his pride, it seems, has only been strengthened by his grief and anger. Boris Moiseyevich Khodorkovsky, 71, isn't just another elderly Russian whose life was radically altered by the fall of the Soviet Union. He is the father of Mikhail Borisovich Khodorkovsky, once Russia's richest man and now its most famous accused criminal.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau Chief Staff writer John Fairhall in Little Rock, Ark. contributed to this story | October 22, 1992
DENVER -- Amid signs that support for Ross Perot could be growing, Gov. Bill Clinton may begin directly attacking the Texas billionaire in the final days of the presidential race, campaign officials said yesterday.The Democratic nominee continues to maintain a commanding lead over President Bush and Mr. Perot in the polls. But support for the independent candidate appears, if anything, to be increasingly as Election Day nears.One independent pollster said voters have adopted a far more positive view of Mr. Perot since the presidential debates, in which he received generally high marks from the public and politicians.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
In the world of John G. Roberts Jr., it appears the only true case of government corruption is the "American Hustle" style of handing over a pile of money to a congressman in some smoke-filled backroom deal. Yet here in the real world, we've come to understand that corruption is a subtler evil where money buys access and preference, resulting in gifts not necessarily tied up with a bow under a tree, but just as real and valuable. Forty years ago, Americans were outraged by this potential assault on democracy, and so were enough members of Congress to support bipartisan limits on campaign donations.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 2, 2014
America is not yet an oligarchy, but that's where Charles and David Koch and a few other billionaires are taking us. American democracy used to depend on political parties that more or less represented most of us. Political scientists of the 1950s and 1960s marveled at American "pluralism," by which they meant the capacities of parties and other membership groups to reflect the preferences of the vast majority of citizens. Then around a quarter century ago, as income and wealth began concentrating at the top, the Republican and Democratic parties started to morph into mechanisms for extracting money, mostly from wealthy people.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Kevin Plank soared up Forbes' list of the world's top billionaires. The 41-year-old founder and CEO of Baltimore-based Under Armour is now the world's 731 s t richest person, with a net worth of $2.4 billion. That's up from number 1,175 on last year's list, when Plank had a net worth of $1.2 billion. Plank, who owns more than 21 million shares of Under Armour, has steered the sports apparel maker in just the past several months through continued overseas expansion, the company's first acquisition and a 10-year deal to supply the athletic teams at the University of Notre Dame, Forbes noted in its list.
NEWS
By David H. Rothman | February 1, 2014
Andrew Carnegie was a social Darwinian. He wanted to give the fittest the tools to rise to the top. Public libraries - as spreaders of skills, knowledge and culture - advanced his goal. Often hailed as Carnegie II, Bill Gates is if nothing else a champion of standardized testing and other forms of meritocracy. So here's a not-so-modest proposal for one of planet Earth's richest people, now worth around $78.5 billion. Update Carnegie's vision. Work toward a national digital library endowment, which, as I'll show, could boost K-12 test scores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
 With Amazon founder Jeff Bezos buying the Washington Post and eBay founder Pierre Omidyar putting up $250 milllion for a project featuring journalist Glenn Greenwald, it is starting to feel as tech billionaires might be just the folks to save journalism. But what kind of owners will they be? That's one of the questions discussed on Howard Kurtz's "Media Buzz" show Sunday on Fox News. Here's video (below) of Kurtz, me and Farhad Manjoo, tech columnist for the Wall Street Journal, talking about the roles tech money and expertise could play in the future of journalism.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Bankrupt RG Steel's unsecured creditors are seeking permission to sue Ira Rennert — the billionaire who created the company to buy Sparrows Point — for allegedly worsening the steel mill owner's financial situation in order to improve his own. The Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors told the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del., that it might be able to recover more than $238 million if allowed to pursue claims against Rennert for...
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 23, 1992
It's Federal Hill that is hollow and tunneled throughout, not the downtown renascence.Good news! Baker is coming back to save the White House. The world is on its own.Ross got out after Bill purged the Democratic platform of anything to which a billionaire might reasonably object.
NEWS
October 3, 1999
Akio Morita,75, the entrepreneurwho co-founded Sony Corp. and helped give new meaning to the words "Made in Japan," died today in Tokyo, Kyodo news service reported.Ted Arison,75, the American-Israeli billionaire who founded Carnival Cruise Lines, died of a heart attack Friday in Jerusalem.Pub Date: 10/03/99
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | December 26, 2012
What's the biggest political lesson of 2012? Some say it's that money doesn't count all that much. Even though billionaires and big corporations poured huge amounts into the 2012 election, they lost big. They learned the lesson and won't try to buy another election. Baloney. It's true their political investments didn't exactly pay off this time around. Republican operative Karl Rove's two giant political funds -- American Crossroads (a super PAC) and Crossroads Grassroots Policy Strategies (a so-called nonprofit "social welfare organization" that doesn't have to report its donors)
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 22, 2012
Last Friday, Paul Ryan, the presumptive Republican vice presidential nominee, made the most populist speech of this campaign season. "It's the people who are politically connected, it's the people who have access to Washington that get the breaks," he told an enthusiastic crowd of more than 2,000 at a high school gym in Virginia. "Well, no more. We don't want to pick winners and losers in Washington. ... Hardworking taxpayers should be treated fairly, and it should be based on whether they're good, whether they work hard and not who they know in Washington.
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