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Billie Holiday

NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | July 17, 2009
When Baltimore sculptor James Earl Reid created the city's first memorial to the stunningly gifted jazz singer Billie Holiday in 1985, something was missing. Gone were the panels containing references to the Jim Crow era and the lynching that Holiday so chillingly recounted in the ballad "Strange Fruit." Now Reid has a chance to remedy what he calls censorship by city officials, by adding the bronze panels for today's rededication of the statue on the 50th anniversary of her death. The striking, 8-foot-6-inch-high, 1,200-pound likeness of the Baltimore-born Holiday, wearing a strapless gown, with her trademark gardenias in her hair and her mouth open in song, will now rest on a 20,000-pound base of solid granite, as Reid had intended all along.
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NEWS
By Earl Arnett | November 11, 1991
LADY DAY: THE MANY FACES OF BILLIE HOLIDAY. By Robert O'Meally. Arcade Publishing Inc. 207 pages. $29.95. An accompanying VHS videotape sells for $29.95. SHE CALLED herself Billie Holiday. Others called her "Lady Day." Jazz critic Martin Williams, who played a role in the inception of this project, labeled her a great musician and "a great natural actress who had learned to draw on her own feelings and convey them with honest directness to a listener."After 207 pages (and more than 178 photographs and illustrations, a bibliography and notes)
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | November 1, 1995
Remember the werewolves of London? Looks like there's something new (but not as hairy) haunting the banks of the Thames. Angela Oriente, who runs A&M Costume Gallery in Parkville, got a call the other day from an American in London. His name was Matthew Anderson and he was desperate for -- get this -- a Judge Ito mask for Halloween.Angela thought it was a joke -- until Anderson called back, and called a third and fourth time. "He said he couldn't find a Judge Ito mask in London," Angela reports.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 30, 1993
Billie Holiday didn't sing a song, so much as take dreamy, demonic possession of it. When she sang of ''Strange Fruit,'' she could darken every spirit in the room. When she sang ''Body and Soul,'' everyone knew the plaintive catch in her voice came out of a history of unrelieved heartache.She seemed to lapse her way into a lyric and then struggle to get herself out. You can listen to her now, 34 years after her haunted life and her pitiful death, and still sense the pain and conflict. When Billie Holiday stood behind a microphone, it wasn't a performance, it was a declaration of vulnerability, a woman-child huddled in a corner hoping not to be hurt any more.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | October 22, 2007
Vocalist Ruby Glover, a vibrant link to Baltimore's rich jazz heritage, died Saturday, a day after collapsing onstage during a performance at the Creative Alliance in East Baltimore. On Friday night, Ms. Glover was thrilled to see a full house gathered for a House of Ruth benefit where she was among the performers. With her silver cropped hair, Ms. Glover, 77, appeared as radiant and polished as ever on stage, recalled friend Megan Hamilton. Emcee Stan Stovall from WBAL-TV introduced Ms.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2004
Billie Holiday birthday Mark the birthday of Baltimore-born legend Billie Holiday tomorrow with a concert at the New Haven Lounge. The blues singer, who died in 1959 at the age of 44, will be commemorated in song by the Jump Street Band and past winners of the mayor's Billie Holiday vocal competition. Admission is free for this 9:30 p.m. event. The New Haven Lounge is at 1552 Havenwood Road. For more information, call 410-366-7416. Death metal effect Get a dose of death metal this weekend at the Thunderdome.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Staff Writer | February 26, 1993
Ruby Glover remembers the clubs along Pennsylvania Avenue in the 1940s as the launching pads for her career. Many black entertainers came to "the Avenue," and as a girl she watched the stars and learned."
FEATURES
By Suzanna Stephens and Suzanna Stephens,Contributing Writer | April 10, 1995
Billie Holiday's songs are characterized by passion wrought of love and most often struggle. For Robin Rouse, the winner of the annual Billie Holiday Vocal Competition, the passion is for performance, the love for her supportive husband Darryl, and the struggle was healing her voice in time for Saturday's competition after suffering a sudden illness the preceding night.Mrs. Rouse and 12 other competing amateur vocalists honored the legacy of the Baltimore-bred singer on Saturday, the day after what would have been her 80th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and By Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
A soft breeze ruffles the grass and weeds on the vacant lot on Pennsylvania Avenue where the Club Tijuana once filled the night with jazz. The Tijuana is long gone. But in this empty space there is room enough for the music to echo in the memory. "Everybody you could name, if they played in Baltimore, they played at the Tijuana," says Ruby Glover, who started singing on The Avenue something like 50 years ago. "It was just swinging all the time, all the time. The glamour. The gorgeous feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2009
Becoming Billie Holiday Poems by Carol Boston Weatherford, art by Floyd Cooper Wordsong / 117 pages / $19.95 These brief, first-person poems tell the story of Eleanora Fagan, who grew up impoverished on Durham Street in a rough East Baltimore neighborhood, yet became a world-renowned jazz singer. With little education and no vocal training, Billie Holiday (she changed her name when she began singing) had an obsessive love for jazz, an excellent ear for rhythm and a voice that was almost able to float.
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