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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Staff Writer | September 25, 1992
In a major victory for community groups opposed to billboard advertising in the inner city, the city zoning board rejected yesterday applications by a Baltimore company to obtain permits for more than 80 "junior billboards" that have been posted illegally for years.The action by the Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals to reject every application sought by Boisclair Advertising/Chesapeake Outdoor Enterprises means the billboards must come down.The decisions by the board came at the conclusion of 10 hours of hearings spread over two days and capped a two-year battle over illegal billboard advertising in Baltimore.
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NEWS
July 24, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- A billboard advertising apartments in the Mid-Town Belvedere area does not have a permit, according to city officials, but getting it taken down has proven difficult. THE BACKSTORY -- Darrell Bishop of Mount Vernon doesn't have a lot of confidence in the bureaucracy of city government. "I never expect anything to happen on the first go-around," he told Watchdog. "If you have low expectations and they are never met, the first time they are met it gives you a whole different outlook."
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1996
City Solicitor Neal M. Janey is leaving next month to return to private law practice after serving more than eight years for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.He will join the law firm of Miles & Stockbridge as co-manager of its government relations practice with O. James Lighthizer. The former Anne Arundel County executive and state transportation secretary also is joining the firm.Janey's departure comes more than a year after he first announced he was leaving his job as top City Hall lawyer. He changed his mind after Schmoke persuaded him to stay for the transition into his third mayoral term.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2000
The proposed ban on new billboards in Baltimore took a significant step forward this week when the City Planning Commission approved the bill intended to preserve the city's appearance. The 4-1 vote, which came during a packed City Hall hearing late Thursday, set the stage for a swift review by the land use committee and a City Council vote. But it also prompted the city's largest billboard advertiser to threaten to leave town. "You can bet Eller will relocate its 70 employees out of Baltimore," if the bill becomes law, said Don Scherer, president of Eller Media Co. His company, which owns 500 of the city's 900 billboards, is the largest of three outdoor sign businesses in Baltimore.
NEWS
May 26, 1993
The answer to the question posed above is "probably not." Gov. William Donald Schaefer has on his desk a bill that would give Baltimore City officials the power to ban liquor ads from billboards. Mr. Schaefer isn't under the gun to ban these liquor ads; he's simply being asked to sign enabling legislation giving city office holders the power to restrict this type of advertising.Opponents of the bill have raised legitimate concerns about the impingement of free speech for commercial advertisers.
NEWS
July 24, 2007
THE PROBLEM -- A billboard advertising apartments in the Mid-Town Belvedere area does not have a permit, according to city officials, but getting it taken down has proven difficult. THE BACKSTORY -- Darrell Bishop of Mount Vernon doesn't have a lot of confidence in the bureaucracy of city government. "I never expect anything to happen on the first go-around," he told Watchdog. "If you have low expectations and they are never met, the first time they are met it gives you a whole different outlook."
NEWS
October 15, 1993
A coalition of more than 100 Baltimore City community groups scored an unexpected victory in the General Assembly earlier this year. Defeating high-paid lobbyists, they garnered enough support to pass legislation that enables the city to limit certain types of advertising.Two detailed enforcement ordinances -- one for curtailing liquor advertising, the other restricting outdoor promotion of tobacco -- are now before the City Council. Chances for passage appear good, as 10 of the 19 council members are sponsors.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | October 26, 1993
Like chess pieces on the attack, billboards hawking everything from cigarettes to cemeteries surround the 15-block community of Langston Hughes in Northwest Baltimore. The billboards are strategically placed, so that few residents can leave home without seeing at least one advertisement.If this were a chess game, the community would have to concede the match. But this isn't chess and the Langston Hughes community, like neighborhoods all over the city, refuses to surrender."I'm very much against them -- we've been fighting against them and fighting against them for years," says Earles R. Mitchell, the 75-year-old leader of the Langston Hughes Community Association.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
The Anne Arundel County Council will vote next month on a bill that would ban most outdoor tobacco advertising and effectively put Joe Camel under house arrest.The billboard and cigarette industries are lobbying hard against the proposal. And, as with the growing number of clashes nationally over tobacco advertising, some of the political maneuvering in Anne Arundel County appears to be smoke and mirrors.During the 18 months County Councilman Thomas W. Redmond has been pushing to outlaw cigarette billboards in residential areas, all cigarette billboards in Anne Arundel County -- as many as 15 signs -- have mysteriously disappeared.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 10, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- The Los Angeles City Council passed a law yesterday that will virtually eliminate outdoor alcohol and tobacco advertising in Los Angeles.In a hearing attended by hundreds of elementary and high-school students as well as lawyers for the beer, billboard advertising and tobacco industries and advocates for grocers' associations, the City Council unanimously voted a ban encompassing billboards, grocery store windows and other outdoor venues within 1,000 feet of schools, parks and residential areas.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 10, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- The Los Angeles City Council passed a law yesterday that will virtually eliminate outdoor alcohol and tobacco advertising in Los Angeles.In a hearing attended by hundreds of elementary and high-school students as well as lawyers for the beer, billboard advertising and tobacco industries and advocates for grocers' associations, the City Council unanimously voted a ban encompassing billboards, grocery store windows and other outdoor venues within 1,000 feet of schools, parks and residential areas.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
The Anne Arundel County Council will vote next month on a bill that would ban most outdoor tobacco advertising and effectively put Joe Camel under house arrest.The billboard and cigarette industries are lobbying hard against the proposal. And, as with the growing number of clashes nationally over tobacco advertising, some of the political maneuvering in Anne Arundel County appears to be smoke and mirrors.During the 18 months County Councilman Thomas W. Redmond has been pushing to outlaw cigarette billboards in residential areas, all cigarette billboards in Anne Arundel County -- as many as 15 signs -- have mysteriously disappeared.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1996
City Solicitor Neal M. Janey is leaving next month to return to private law practice after serving more than eight years for Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.He will join the law firm of Miles & Stockbridge as co-manager of its government relations practice with O. James Lighthizer. The former Anne Arundel County executive and state transportation secretary also is joining the firm.Janey's departure comes more than a year after he first announced he was leaving his job as top City Hall lawyer. He changed his mind after Schmoke persuaded him to stay for the transition into his third mayoral term.
NEWS
May 23, 1996
FREE SPEECH is a cherished touchstone of American constitutional rights, but it does not come without a price. A recent Supreme Court decision, along with a subsequent order from the high court, could bring deep disappointment to community activists who have worked diligently to improve their neighborhoods by limiting the profusion of unsightly billboards advertising liquor, tobacco and other harmful products.Earlier this month, the court threw out a Rhode Island law that prohibited liquor dealers from advertising prices, ruling that government cannot seek to protect citizens from harmful but legal habits at the expense of the free speech rights of businesses.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | February 15, 1996
PARIS -- Money always is part of politics, but not the kind of money Americans now are spending, and there is gathering recognition that this has to change.The man who has spent the most money this season to become president, $16.5 million thus far, Steve Forbes, ran a poor fourth in the Iowa presidential caucuses Monday. But all three of the Republican candidates who ran ahead of him spent sums that would be considered astronomical and unacceptable in other Western democracies.Bill Bradley retired this year from the Senate because of his discouragement with the way politics now are practiced.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | October 26, 1993
Like chess pieces on the attack, billboards hawking everything from cigarettes to cemeteries surround the 15-block community of Langston Hughes in Northwest Baltimore. The billboards are strategically placed, so that few residents can leave home without seeing at least one advertisement.If this were a chess game, the community would have to concede the match. But this isn't chess and the Langston Hughes community, like neighborhoods all over the city, refuses to surrender."I'm very much against them -- we've been fighting against them and fighting against them for years," says Earles R. Mitchell, the 75-year-old leader of the Langston Hughes Community Association.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | February 15, 1996
PARIS -- Money always is part of politics, but not the kind of money Americans now are spending, and there is gathering recognition that this has to change.The man who has spent the most money this season to become president, $16.5 million thus far, Steve Forbes, ran a poor fourth in the Iowa presidential caucuses Monday. But all three of the Republican candidates who ran ahead of him spent sums that would be considered astronomical and unacceptable in other Western democracies.Bill Bradley retired this year from the Senate because of his discouragement with the way politics now are practiced.
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | October 30, 1990
I started off in the north, amid the undulating, green hills of Hunt Valley, where multistoried homes sit far off and on high like distant castles.Then down Falls Road to Ruxton, where every house has a chimney -- and some of them have more than one -- and where the homes are nestled among the trees, snug and comfortable like forest cottages.Now over and around the Beltway to the tidy suburban tracts south of the city, with their smooth, trim, green lawns.Finally, down to the quiet, half-hidden waterfront communities that radiate out from Ritchie Highway.
NEWS
October 15, 1993
A coalition of more than 100 Baltimore City community groups scored an unexpected victory in the General Assembly earlier this year. Defeating high-paid lobbyists, they garnered enough support to pass legislation that enables the city to limit certain types of advertising.Two detailed enforcement ordinances -- one for curtailing liquor advertising, the other restricting outdoor promotion of tobacco -- are now before the City Council. Chances for passage appear good, as 10 of the 19 council members are sponsors.
NEWS
May 26, 1993
The answer to the question posed above is "probably not." Gov. William Donald Schaefer has on his desk a bill that would give Baltimore City officials the power to ban liquor ads from billboards. Mr. Schaefer isn't under the gun to ban these liquor ads; he's simply being asked to sign enabling legislation giving city office holders the power to restrict this type of advertising.Opponents of the bill have raised legitimate concerns about the impingement of free speech for commercial advertisers.
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