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Bill Veeck

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SPORTS
By Sports Digest | January 13, 2010
David Tyree of the Ravens, Willie Gault and Tim Dwight are scheduled to run the "Super 60," a 60-meter dash, at the Millrose Games on Jan. 29 in New York. Organizers plan to add other football players to the field. USA Track and Field CEO Doug Logan said the race isn't a publicity stunt. "This is a real distance. They're real athletes. We're not doing Bill Veeck putting a midget in front of a pitcher," Logan said of the St. Louis Browns owner's 1951 promotion.
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SPORTS
By Tribune Newspapers | July 24, 2011
Roland Hemond never worked for George Steinbrenner, Walter O'Malley or Gussie Busch. He was never given unlimited resources to work with, but made up for it with a limitless imagination. Competing with less became one of his specialties. "Actually, you have to make it fun," Hemond said. "Certainly with Bill Veeck. He'd say, you know, 'We don't have any money, we'll think of something,' and sometimes we'd think of something at 2 in the morning. I'd say to Bill, 'I wonder why we didn't think of it earlier,' but we had fun. " Hemond, who was the Orioles' general manager from 1988 to 1995, was given the Buck O'Neil Lifetime Achievement Award during Saturday's Hall of Fame activities.
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SPORTS
By Brad Snyder | June 11, 1995
To avoid hiring a real commissioner to solve baseball's plethora of problems, baseball czar Bud Selig endorsed an Angelosian idea at Wednesday's owners meeting -- build new, publicly-funded ballparks in 11 major league cities. Will these new facilities cure baseball's ills? This week's selection is an unscientific analysis of the franchises with the most recenltly-built ballparks.Colorado Rockies -- UP -- The facade of Coors Field looks like Ebbets Field. The difference is the Rockies aren't playing like bums.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | January 13, 2010
David Tyree of the Ravens, Willie Gault and Tim Dwight are scheduled to run the "Super 60," a 60-meter dash, at the Millrose Games on Jan. 29 in New York. Organizers plan to add other football players to the field. USA Track and Field CEO Doug Logan said the race isn't a publicity stunt. "This is a real distance. They're real athletes. We're not doing Bill Veeck putting a midget in front of a pitcher," Logan said of the St. Louis Browns owner's 1951 promotion.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | April 14, 1991
It was a near thing, but they almost had fun last night at baseball game. Fortunately, alert officials intervened in time.Because if you have fun at one game, who knows where it would lead? Maybe fans would start demanding fun at all the games. This was obviously too great a risk to accept.The place in question was Pompano Beach, Fla., home of the Miami Miracle of the Class A Florida State League. Yes, the Miami Miracle, for reasons too complicated to explain, played in Pompano. And if that isn't weird enough, the Miami/Pompano Miracle wanted to sign a 68-year-old player to a contract.
SPORTS
July 24, 1991
Bill Veeck, who was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday, was considered a master of promotion. But as Lee MacPhail knows, oil's not well that doesn't end well."
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
Had Bill Veeck had his way, Jackie Robinson would not have been pioneer, hero, inspiration. That mantle would belong to others. Four years before Robinson broke baseball's color line in 1947, Veeck tried to buy the floundering Philadelphia Phillies. His plan? Stock the team on the cheap with top players from the Negro leagues, fill the park and turn the game on its segregated ear. Had baseball's maverick pulled that off, the game today would be honoring a different cache of groundbreakers such as Roy Campanella, Satchel Paige and Monte Irvin.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 23, 2005
Chicago-- --The owner was wearing a brand-new White Sox World Series jacket and watched the pre-game circus from behind a pair of dark-rimmed eyeglasses. How exciting it all must be for Jerry Reinsdorf, the easy-to-hate Sox owner who once again has given this city something to be excited about. If there was any real enthusiasm, though, it was buried deep. "Right now, for some strange reason, I feel very calm," he said. That's not how it should be, not here, not with the White Sox. I flipped open my phone and dialed.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker | February 27, 1991
The selection of Bill Veeck to baseball's Hall of Fame was a heart-stirring event to Baltimore Orioles general manager Roland Hemond, who worked for Veeck with the Chicago White Sox during 1975-80."
NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | September 27, 1990
THIS IS the last season for good ol' Comiskey Park on Chicago's South Side -- good 80-year-old Comiskey Park, to be exact. It's the oldest ballpark in the majors -- older even than Fenway in Boston and Tiger Stadium in Detroit and stylish Wrigley Field on the North Side. Comiskey Park will have to go to make room for, of course, a parking lot. The lot will serve the new, space-PaulGreenbergage Comiskey Park nearing completion just across the street. It won't be the same, even if it does have natural grass and good sight lines.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Monica Lopossay and Candus Thomson and Monica Lopossay,Sun reporters | July 9, 2007
BOWIE -- Bad breath is welcome here. Dogs, too. In the minor league world, where you're only as good as your last promotion, the Bowie Baysox roll out the red carpet, even if it does, on occasion, resemble toilet paper. "We want to keep a smile on your face," says Ryan Roberts, team spokesman and one of the merrymakers. When a team like the Baysox hovers around the .
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
Had Bill Veeck had his way, Jackie Robinson would not have been pioneer, hero, inspiration. That mantle would belong to others. Four years before Robinson broke baseball's color line in 1947, Veeck tried to buy the floundering Philadelphia Phillies. His plan? Stock the team on the cheap with top players from the Negro leagues, fill the park and turn the game on its segregated ear. Had baseball's maverick pulled that off, the game today would be honoring a different cache of groundbreakers such as Roy Campanella, Satchel Paige and Monte Irvin.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 23, 2005
Chicago-- --The owner was wearing a brand-new White Sox World Series jacket and watched the pre-game circus from behind a pair of dark-rimmed eyeglasses. How exciting it all must be for Jerry Reinsdorf, the easy-to-hate Sox owner who once again has given this city something to be excited about. If there was any real enthusiasm, though, it was buried deep. "Right now, for some strange reason, I feel very calm," he said. That's not how it should be, not here, not with the White Sox. I flipped open my phone and dialed.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | August 26, 2001
AMID the grandeur that Major League baseball is bestowing on Cal Ripken Jr. during his final season as a player, a slight pause may be in order to remember one of the goofiest moments in the history of the Orioles' franchise -- the day a midget went to bat for the team's hapless progenitor, the lowly St. Louis Browns. This month marks the 50th anniversary of the day the wily Bill Veeck ("as in wreck," he used to say) sent in 3-foot, 7-inch Eddie Gaedel to bat for the Browns, assuring them a walk -- and baseball immortality for him. Even ABC News made note of the milestone, but failed to acknowledge that Veeck (who in later years talked about acquiring the Orioles)
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
Someone else will have to preside over the seventh-inning stretch at Wrigley Field now that Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Caray has passed away, but his friends, fans and colleagues are certain of one thing.No one will ever replace him."Harry Caray was one of a kind, first and foremost a baseball fan," said Dodgers broadcasting legend Vin Scully. "As a fan, he used a microphone to release his emotions. He could be critical, contentious and bombastic, or he could be lovable and full of praise."
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder | June 11, 1995
To avoid hiring a real commissioner to solve baseball's plethora of problems, baseball czar Bud Selig endorsed an Angelosian idea at Wednesday's owners meeting -- build new, publicly-funded ballparks in 11 major league cities. Will these new facilities cure baseball's ills? This week's selection is an unscientific analysis of the franchises with the most recenltly-built ballparks.Colorado Rockies -- UP -- The facade of Coors Field looks like Ebbets Field. The difference is the Rockies aren't playing like bums.
SPORTS
By Mike Littwin | March 3, 1991
Somewhere, a scoreboard is exploding, and a man with wooden leg is smiling. Just when you start to wonder about the world, they put Bill Veeck in the Hall of Fame, and suddenly everything is all right again.This is good news. They say there isn't enough of it in the papers, and maybe that's because there aren't enough Bill Veecks.He was full of good news and strangely wonderful ideas that washed from his brain like waves onto the shore. He was a different kind of baseball owner. He wasn't rich, for one thing.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1998
Someone else will have to preside over the seventh-inning stretch at Wrigley Field now that Hall of Fame broadcaster Harry Caray has passed away, but his friends, fans and colleagues are certain of one thing.No one will ever replace him."Harry Caray was one of a kind, first and foremost a baseball fan," said Dodgers broadcasting legend Vin Scully. "As a fan, he used a microphone to release his emotions. He could be critical, contentious and bombastic, or he could be lovable and full of praise."
NEWS
By David Howell | August 20, 1993
FORTY years ago today -- yes, in 1953, not 1954 -- the St. Louis Browns came to Baltimore.The team came here to play the International League Orioles in the second game of a unique doubleheader at still-under-construction Memorial Stadium.In the first game, the Orioles lost to theirleague rivals, the Montreal Royals, 4-3.Then they lost the second game to the Browns, 8-2. The crowd of 10,681 saw Don Larsen go the distance in limiting the Flock (as they were then known) to five hits.Two of those hits were home runs by shortstop Jack "Lucky" Lohrke and first baseman Jack Graham, a former Brownie.
SPORTS
February 10, 1993
When Don Wardlow talks about baseball, it's hard to believe he's never seen a game -- even though he's been to thousands of them.It's even harder to believe that Wardlow is a color commentator for radio broadcasts of baseball games."
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