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By Bill Thomas and Bill Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 1996
Some writers launch their books on "60 Minutes." Some on "Entertainment Tonight." I hit the air waves at 7: 25 a.m. on WRCX in Chicago with a morning disc jockey known as Man Cow."Just call him Man Cow," a producer told me over the phone. "He's a really fun guy."Moooooo."All right, we have Bill Thomas on the line!" yelled Man Cow. "He's the author of 'Capital Confidential: 100 Years of Sex, Scandal and Secrets in Washington.' Bill, welcome to the show."Moooooo."Warren Harding's teen-age mistress Ted Kennedy in drag The first gay couple to dance at the White House Let me tell you, gang, this book's got everything!"
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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,tanika.white@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
After graduating from Harvard Medical School, Dr. Bill Thomas - exhausted from the pace of emergency room shifts - took a part-time job in a nursing home, thinking he could catch up on some nap time. Instead, the experience awakened in Thomas a desire to help the "elders" who had been relegated to nursing homes - places that he thought to be, by and large, cold, solitary and regimented. "When I went to work at the nursing home," he said, "I quickly discovered I could make life better for each and every person I was taking care of. "Because their problems didn't have to do with their medications.
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FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 30, 1994
"Roommates" has a lot going for it: good premise, great cast, one truly touching scene.But in the end it never comes together. The parts never mesh. And you're left feeling frustrated that producer Michael Filerman didn't take this project back to the drawing board before he started filming and come up with a script worthy of its promise."Roommates," which airs at 9 tonight on NBC (WMAR, Channel 2), is the story of two men who wind up sharing an apartment for people infected with the AIDS virus.
FEATURES
By Bill Thomas and Bill Thomas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 1996
Some writers launch their books on "60 Minutes." Some on "Entertainment Tonight." I hit the air waves at 7: 25 a.m. on WRCX in Chicago with a morning disc jockey known as Man Cow."Just call him Man Cow," a producer told me over the phone. "He's a really fun guy."Moooooo."All right, we have Bill Thomas on the line!" yelled Man Cow. "He's the author of 'Capital Confidential: 100 Years of Sex, Scandal and Secrets in Washington.' Bill, welcome to the show."Moooooo."Warren Harding's teen-age mistress Ted Kennedy in drag The first gay couple to dance at the White House Let me tell you, gang, this book's got everything!"
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,tanika.white@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
After graduating from Harvard Medical School, Dr. Bill Thomas - exhausted from the pace of emergency room shifts - took a part-time job in a nursing home, thinking he could catch up on some nap time. Instead, the experience awakened in Thomas a desire to help the "elders" who had been relegated to nursing homes - places that he thought to be, by and large, cold, solitary and regimented. "When I went to work at the nursing home," he said, "I quickly discovered I could make life better for each and every person I was taking care of. "Because their problems didn't have to do with their medications.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Correspondent | January 22, 1992
MINNEAPOLIS -- The list of accomplishments for Thurman Thomas in 1991 is already stunning:* He has been named the NFL's Most Valuable Player.* He has been selected for his third straight Pro Bowl.* He will play in his second straight Super Bowl.And still, Thomas, the Buffalo Bills' enigmatic running back, is not a happy camper. He wants more.He wants a victory over the Washington Redskins in Super Bowl XXVI on Sunday, and he wants to be acknowledged as the best running back in the NFL. Neither is going to come easily, of course.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Thurman Thomas, the angry young man of Super Bowl XXVI, has turned pacifist for Super Bowl XXVII.Gone is the chip on his shoulder of a year ago -- the one he dared anyone to knock off.Gone, too, is the shrill blast of discord on the Buffalo Bills. It's been replaced by the light, harmonious note of unity.Not gone, though, is the nightmarish memory of the lost helmet. Thomas' lost helmet.When someone unwittingly moved his helmet from the spot he had left it moments before the Bills' offense took the field against the Washington Redskins last year, the veteran running back was forced to sit out the first two plays of Super Bowl XXVI.
SPORTS
December 30, 1991
Once, there were doubts about Thurman Thomas. Was he big enough to make it in the NFL? What shape were his knees in? Could he catch the ball?Now, the only question about Thomas seems to be, "What can't he do?"The Buffalo Bills running back was selected yesterday as the NFL Offensive Player of the Year in voting conducted by The Associated Press. Thomas was a runaway winner over teammate Jim Kelly in balloting by 82 media members.For the third straight year, Thomas led the NFL in combined rushing and receiving yards.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 31, 1994
ATLANTA -- They met on the field afterward, the two Pro Bowl running backs, the friendliest of rivals, the goat and the MVP.Emmitt Smith introduced his niece to Thurman Thomas."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 27, 1992
MINNEAPOLIS -- Right to the bitter end, Thurman Thomas held his ground.In the wake of last night's thrashing at the hands of the Washington Redskins, Super Bowl XXVI's biggest pouter second-guessed the Buffalo Bills' offensive coaches and said that he didn't get the ball enough.With Thomas, there are no concession speeches, only frontal assaults."I don't know what our offensive coaches were thinking," the veteran running back said after the Bills' 37-24 loss at the Metrodome. "I thought I should have been used more in the second half.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 30, 1994
"Roommates" has a lot going for it: good premise, great cast, one truly touching scene.But in the end it never comes together. The parts never mesh. And you're left feeling frustrated that producer Michael Filerman didn't take this project back to the drawing board before he started filming and come up with a script worthy of its promise."Roommates," which airs at 9 tonight on NBC (WMAR, Channel 2), is the story of two men who wind up sharing an apartment for people infected with the AIDS virus.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 31, 1994
ATLANTA -- They met on the field afterward, the two Pro Bowl running backs, the friendliest of rivals, the goat and the MVP.Emmitt Smith introduced his niece to Thurman Thomas."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Thurman Thomas, the angry young man of Super Bowl XXVI, has turned pacifist for Super Bowl XXVII.Gone is the chip on his shoulder of a year ago -- the one he dared anyone to knock off.Gone, too, is the shrill blast of discord on the Buffalo Bills. It's been replaced by the light, harmonious note of unity.Not gone, though, is the nightmarish memory of the lost helmet. Thomas' lost helmet.When someone unwittingly moved his helmet from the spot he had left it moments before the Bills' offense took the field against the Washington Redskins last year, the veteran running back was forced to sit out the first two plays of Super Bowl XXVI.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 27, 1992
MINNEAPOLIS -- Right to the bitter end, Thurman Thomas held his ground.In the wake of last night's thrashing at the hands of the Washington Redskins, Super Bowl XXVI's biggest pouter second-guessed the Buffalo Bills' offensive coaches and said that he didn't get the ball enough.With Thomas, there are no concession speeches, only frontal assaults."I don't know what our offensive coaches were thinking," the veteran running back said after the Bills' 37-24 loss at the Metrodome. "I thought I should have been used more in the second half.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Correspondent | January 22, 1992
MINNEAPOLIS -- The list of accomplishments for Thurman Thomas in 1991 is already stunning:* He has been named the NFL's Most Valuable Player.* He has been selected for his third straight Pro Bowl.* He will play in his second straight Super Bowl.And still, Thomas, the Buffalo Bills' enigmatic running back, is not a happy camper. He wants more.He wants a victory over the Washington Redskins in Super Bowl XXVI on Sunday, and he wants to be acknowledged as the best running back in the NFL. Neither is going to come easily, of course.
SPORTS
December 31, 1991
Buffalo Bills running back Thurman Thomas, who led the league in combined yardage for the third straight year, was selected yesterday as The Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player. Thomas had 39 votes, easily outdistancing Bills teammate Jim Kelly and college teammate Barry Sanders.Earlier this week, Thomas was voted Offensive Player of the Year.Thomas felt the awards were vindication for all the smaller players in the league. Thomas is 5 feet 11 and 198 pounds."I was always one of those kids, hey, you dare me to do something -- dare me to jump over a barbed wire fence -- I'd try," he says.
NEWS
February 14, 2005
On February 11, 2005, REV. SUSAN THOMAS-AZUD; loving mother of Andrew Thomas-Azud and Luke Thomas-Azud; dear sister of Barbara Thomas and Bill Thomas. Friends may call at the family owned Bruzdzinski Funeral Home, P.A., 1407 Old Eastern Avenue, Essex at Rt. 702 (beltway exit 36), on Monday and Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Services on Wednesday at 1 P.M. in Back River United Methodist Church. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Kidney Foundation or the Wise Avenue Volunteer Fire Company.
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