Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBill Shoemaker
IN THE NEWS

Bill Shoemaker

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Bill Christine and Bill Christine,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 13, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Bill Shoemaker, the Hall of Fame jockey who rode more than 8,800 winners, including four Kentucky Derby champions, in a career spanning five decades, died yesterday at his home in Arcadia, Calif. He was 72. Shoemaker, who had been rendered a quadriplegic in 1990 by injuries sustained in an automobile accident, "died in his sleep of natural causes," said Paddy Gallagher, a trainer at Santa Anita Park who once worked as an assistant to the racing great. "I talked with him a few days ago," said Marje Everett, former chief executive at Hollywood Park and one of Shoemaker's close friends, who said he told her he had an infection.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Bill Christine and Bill Christine,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 13, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Bill Shoemaker, the Hall of Fame jockey who rode more than 8,800 winners, including four Kentucky Derby champions, in a career spanning five decades, died yesterday at his home in Arcadia, Calif. He was 72. Shoemaker, who had been rendered a quadriplegic in 1990 by injuries sustained in an automobile accident, "died in his sleep of natural causes," said Paddy Gallagher, a trainer at Santa Anita Park who once worked as an assistant to the racing great. "I talked with him a few days ago," said Marje Everett, former chief executive at Hollywood Park and one of Shoemaker's close friends, who said he told her he had an infection.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | October 18, 1992
The first day of the International Turf Festival at Laurel turned into a multinational event instead of a predicted rout by the French.Horses trained in three different Laurel notebookcountries and owned by Middle Eastern royalty and a Canadian-born American sports star won the three races.The Baltimore Colts' Band played the "The Star-Spangled Banner" after California-based Glen Kate won the Laurel Dash.The mare's trainer, the legendary ex-jockey Bill Shoemaker, stayed home in San Marino where California Gov. Pete Wilson had proclaimed yesterday "Bill Shoemaker Day."
SPORTS
By Bill Christine and Bill Christine,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2002
INGLEWOOD, Calif. - A man of many scripts - mostly compelling ones - Chris McCarron climaxed more than 28 years as a jockey yesterday by riding Came Home to a two-length win in the $107,500 Affirmed Handicap at Hollywood Park. It was the 34,230th race and the 7,141st win of McCarron's career, and the $64,500 winner's share boosted the 47-year-old Hall of Famer's record purse total to $264,351,579. McCarron's second win yesterday came two days after he had made his last out-of-town appearance by riding two winners and taking an all-star jockey competition at Lone Star Park near Dallas.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Bill Shoemaker, horse racing's winningest jockey, is suing the state of California for $20 million, saying it was responsible for a car accident on April 8, 1991, in San Dimas that left him a quadriplegic from a severe spinal cord injury.In the suit, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, zTC Shoemaker claims the state failed to install guardrails or a sign warning of a dangerous road condition that resulted in his car's tumbling down a steep embankment.At the time of the accident, tests showed that Shoemaker's blood-alcohol level was 0.13, above the legal limit, but he was not charged with driving under the influence.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | May 16, 1991
Racing's greatest jockey lies paralyzed in the trauma unit of Swedish Medical Center in Denver. He needs a respirator to breathe. He is unable to speak.But, even now, they talk of Bill Shoemaker's hands. Small, yet powerful, those hands could soothe and coax racehorses into becoming legends.He rode Swaps and Ferdinand, Damascus and Sword Dancer, Forego and John Henry. He won 8,883 races. He was a jockey for 41 years, a 4-foot-11, 98-pound athletic giant."The man had the greatest set of hands in this business," trainer Ron McAnally said.
SPORTS
By Bill Christine and Bill Christine,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 2002
INGLEWOOD, Calif. - A man of many scripts - mostly compelling ones - Chris McCarron climaxed more than 28 years as a jockey yesterday by riding Came Home to a two-length win in the $107,500 Affirmed Handicap at Hollywood Park. It was the 34,230th race and the 7,141st win of McCarron's career, and the $64,500 winner's share boosted the 47-year-old Hall of Famer's record purse total to $264,351,579. McCarron's second win yesterday came two days after he had made his last out-of-town appearance by riding two winners and taking an all-star jockey competition at Lone Star Park near Dallas.
FEATURES
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2000
On Preakness Day -- or anytime there's big-time horse racing in this country -- take a moment to look out on the track during the post parade and know that you are gazing upon some of the greatest athletes in the world. Not the thoroughbreds. The men and women who ride them. These athletes are known around the world as jockeys. Race riders is a more descriptive term, but whatever they are called, riding a 1,000-pound animal on a 2 1/2-pound saddle at speeds of more than 35 miles per hour in heavy traffic requires a combination of skill, conditioning, balance, split-second decision-making and, above all, sheer bravery that is probably unparalleled in sports.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | April 30, 1993
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Bill Shoemaker was back at Churchill Downs yesterday, unable even to scratch an itch on his nose, yet still trying to win another Kentucky Derby.It was a triumph and a tragedy, but neither so much as the latest scene from a very bad ending. Nothing more than that.It should have been more, of course. More stirring. More sympathetic. America's jockey returning at age 61 as the trainer of a Derby contender. His limp little body strapped into a wheelchair, where he has been since he rolled his Bronco down a highway embankment two years ago and wound up a quadriplegic.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | April 11, 1995
ARCADIA, Calif. -- Former Maryland standout Kent Desormeaux is on the verge of becoming the youngest thoroughbred rider to reach 3,000 victories.With his victory on favored Offshore Pirate in yesterday's first race at Santa Anita Park, Desormeaux, who turned 25 on Feb. 27, moved within four of the plateau. Chris McCarron, Sandy Hawley and Bill Shoemaker were the previous youngest. They reached 3,000 when they were 27.After riding at Santa Anita on Thursday and Friday, Desormeaux will be at Keeneland in Lexington, Ky., Friday and at Golden Gate Fields in the Bay Area on Saturday.
FEATURES
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2000
On Preakness Day -- or anytime there's big-time horse racing in this country -- take a moment to look out on the track during the post parade and know that you are gazing upon some of the greatest athletes in the world. Not the thoroughbreds. The men and women who ride them. These athletes are known around the world as jockeys. Race riders is a more descriptive term, but whatever they are called, riding a 1,000-pound animal on a 2 1/2-pound saddle at speeds of more than 35 miles per hour in heavy traffic requires a combination of skill, conditioning, balance, split-second decision-making and, above all, sheer bravery that is probably unparalleled in sports.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | April 30, 1993
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Bill Shoemaker was back at Churchill Downs yesterday, unable even to scratch an itch on his nose, yet still trying to win another Kentucky Derby.It was a triumph and a tragedy, but neither so much as the latest scene from a very bad ending. Nothing more than that.It should have been more, of course. More stirring. More sympathetic. America's jockey returning at age 61 as the trainer of a Derby contender. His limp little body strapped into a wheelchair, where he has been since he rolled his Bronco down a highway embankment two years ago and wound up a quadriplegic.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | October 18, 1992
The first day of the International Turf Festival at Laurel turned into a multinational event instead of a predicted rout by the French.Horses trained in three different Laurel notebookcountries and owned by Middle Eastern royalty and a Canadian-born American sports star won the three races.The Baltimore Colts' Band played the "The Star-Spangled Banner" after California-based Glen Kate won the Laurel Dash.The mare's trainer, the legendary ex-jockey Bill Shoemaker, stayed home in San Marino where California Gov. Pete Wilson had proclaimed yesterday "Bill Shoemaker Day."
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Bill Shoemaker, horse racing's winningest jockey, is suing the state of California for $20 million, saying it was responsible for a car accident on April 8, 1991, in San Dimas that left him a quadriplegic from a severe spinal cord injury.In the suit, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, zTC Shoemaker claims the state failed to install guardrails or a sign warning of a dangerous road condition that resulted in his car's tumbling down a steep embankment.At the time of the accident, tests showed that Shoemaker's blood-alcohol level was 0.13, above the legal limit, but he was not charged with driving under the influence.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | May 16, 1991
Racing's greatest jockey lies paralyzed in the trauma unit of Swedish Medical Center in Denver. He needs a respirator to breathe. He is unable to speak.But, even now, they talk of Bill Shoemaker's hands. Small, yet powerful, those hands could soothe and coax racehorses into becoming legends.He rode Swaps and Ferdinand, Damascus and Sword Dancer, Forego and John Henry. He won 8,883 races. He was a jockey for 41 years, a 4-foot-11, 98-pound athletic giant."The man had the greatest set of hands in this business," trainer Ron McAnally said.
SPORTS
April 11, 1991
Hall of Fame jockey Bill Shoemaker had "a couple beers" 2 1/2 hours before his car crashed and left him partially paralyzed, a friend says.But the jockey had a blood-alcohol content of 0.13 percent, according to the California Highway Patrol. That is nearly twice the legal limit of 0.08 percent.Don Pierce, a trainer and former jockey, said he and Shoemaker drank a few beers about 6 p.m. Monday after playing golf at the Sierra La Verne Country Club.Shoemaker, 59, remained in critical condition after he fractured his neck in the accident.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1996
A full field of 14 fillies and mares has been entered for tomorrow's Grade II, $200,000 Barbara Fritchie Handicap at Laurel Park, including two horses who will run as a field entry and four stakes winners from other venues.Among the nationally known trainers involved are Eclipse Award winner Bill Mott (Cigar), Neil Howard and Bill Shoemaker.One member of the field, Dancing Lassy, finished second to Cormorant's Flight, one of the probable Fritchie favorites, in the Maryland Racing Writers' Handicap three weeks ago.Cormorant's Flight, winner of two straight stakes here, has drawn the No. 8 post, two inside of Mott's Traverse City, a Grade 3 winner last time out at Aqueduct and an in-the-money finisher in 27 of 28 starts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.