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By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com | January 16, 2010
Schoolchildren are being asked to empty their piggy banks and hold fundraisers in a statewide campaign organized by the Maryland State Department of Education to help children in Haiti. The donations will be collected at the state's 1,600 schools and then given to the 2010 Haiti Relief and Development Fund of the American Red Cross. "Most students have seen the devastation in Haiti, and they feel helpless. This is something they can do," said Bill Reinhard, a spokesman for the department.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Under a new federal accountability system, Maryland is no longer in compliance with the rules governing special-education students because the state's schools exempt a high percentage of students from national testing. The announcement this week by federal education officials means Maryland will have to pressure local school systems to include more students in the National Assessment of Educational Testing, a national test in math and reading that is given every two years. Thirty other states and the District of Columbia were also found out of compliance for a variety of reasons.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie , liz.bowie@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
Maryland's efforts to reel in up to $260 million in federal stimulus money aimed at education reform received a setback this week. The state did not get a competitive grant from the nonprofit Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to help put together an application for the stimulus money, according to Maryland State Department of Education spokesman Bill Reinhard. The $4 billion in Race to the Top education money is the largest pot of federal money ever dedicated to education reform, and it is expected to spur states to make significant changes.
NEWS
Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Union officials and lawmakers seized on Baltimore County's bungled rollout of a Common Core curriculum to renew calls to give teachers and school districts more time to implement the new rigorous education standards. The county school system paid $2.1 million last year to edCount LLC, the company it hired to write new language-arts course plans, even though it described the work as unsatisfactory in email exchanges obtained by The Baltimore Sun. The district severed ties with the company in June and had a team of county teachers and administrators take up the work.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
A Frederick County chemistry teacher named Maryland's Teacher of the Year last fall is among four educators from around the country who will vie for the title of National Teacher of the Year, the State Department of Education announced Wednesday. Michelle M. Shearer, a chemistry teacher at Urbana High School, will be the second teacher from Maryland to represent the state in the national competition. In 2006, Kimberly Oliver, a kindergarten teacher from Montgomery County, won the national title.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
Except for a delay in a new teacher-evaluation program, Maryland has made a strong start toward achieving the ambitious school reform goals that won the state a coveted $250 million grant, according to federal officials. Maryland, one of 11 states and the District of Columbia to receive Race to the Top funding in 2010 in exchange for committing to school reform, made strides in several areas in the first year of the four-year grant program, U.S. Department of Education officials said in a progress report to be released Tuesday.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Maryland will not be one of the first states to apply for a waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind Act, state education officials said Thursday. Last month, President Barack Obama said he would offer states that have embraced his administration's key education reform initiatives a break from the most rigid requirements of the law. The sweeping changes would allow states like Maryland, which is considered well-positioned to receive approval, the chance to put in place their own accountability systems.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
Protesters lined the curb outside the Maryland State Department of Education building in downtown Monday, carrying signs denouncing what they say is the federal takeover of education. The group of 36 said they are against the common core standards, a perfunctory list of what children should be able to do by the end of each grade in school. (For instance the standards determine by what grade students should be adding and subtracting whole numbers.) Local teachers and school districts can determine the lessons and what textbooks and other materials will be used.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Under a new federal accountability system, Maryland is no longer in compliance with the rules governing special-education students because the state's schools exempt a high percentage of students from national testing. The announcement this week by federal education officials means Maryland will have to pressure local school systems to include more students in the National Assessment of Educational Testing, a national test in math and reading that is given every two years. Thirty other states and the District of Columbia were also found out of compliance for a variety of reasons.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
Kharina Chapron, a senior at Hammond High School in Columbia whose parents are native Haitians, has been overwhelmed by the support her classmates have shown her since a major earthquake struck the country, causing widespread devastation and destruction. When a staff member learned that Chapron had such a close connection to the country, she decided to launch a fundraising effort at the school. As a result, students raised almost $400 in three days by donating money during lunch periods and class breaks.
NEWS
November 18, 2013
Protesters lined the curb outside the Maryland State Department of Education building in downtown Monday, carrying signs denouncing what they say is the federal takeover of education. The group of 36 said they are against the common core standards, a perfunctory list of what children should be able to do by the end of each grade in school. (For instance the standards determine by what grade students should be adding and subtracting whole numbers.) Local teachers and school districts can determine the lessons and what textbooks and other materials will be used.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
A battle over $5 million escalated this week with Anne Arundel County lawmakers threatening repercussions and school leaders saying seven projects for new schools are jeopardized by the fray. At issue is how the county should pay a $5 million tab owed to the school system under Maryland's maintenance-of-effort law. "It'll probably be the last five million [dollars] the Board of Education gets in a long while," Councilman Jamie Benoit, a Democrat from Crownsville, told a school system representative during a public hearing Monday.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
Social studies, a subject that had been demoted in Maryland schools in recent years, will regain some of its past educational stature under a bill signed Tuesday by Gov. Martin O'Malley. Under the legislation — one of hundreds of bills O'Malley signed into law — high school seniors will have to pass an assessment in government to be able to graduate starting with the Class of 2017. The Maryland State Department of Education dropped the test last year. Advocates said the test was eliminated as the result of a de-emphasis on social studies stemming from passage of President George W. Bush's No Child Left Behind bill, which threw federal support behind the instruction of reading and math at the expense of other subjects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
Except for a delay in a new teacher-evaluation program, Maryland has made a strong start toward achieving the ambitious school reform goals that won the state a coveted $250 million grant, according to federal officials. Maryland, one of 11 states and the District of Columbia to receive Race to the Top funding in 2010 in exchange for committing to school reform, made strides in several areas in the first year of the four-year grant program, U.S. Department of Education officials said in a progress report to be released Tuesday.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Maryland will not be one of the first states to apply for a waiver from the federal No Child Left Behind Act, state education officials said Thursday. Last month, President Barack Obama said he would offer states that have embraced his administration's key education reform initiatives a break from the most rigid requirements of the law. The sweeping changes would allow states like Maryland, which is considered well-positioned to receive approval, the chance to put in place their own accountability systems.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
A Frederick County chemistry teacher named Maryland's Teacher of the Year last fall is among four educators from around the country who will vie for the title of National Teacher of the Year, the State Department of Education announced Wednesday. Michelle M. Shearer, a chemistry teacher at Urbana High School, will be the second teacher from Maryland to represent the state in the national competition. In 2006, Kimberly Oliver, a kindergarten teacher from Montgomery County, won the national title.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
A battle over $5 million escalated this week with Anne Arundel County lawmakers threatening repercussions and school leaders saying seven projects for new schools are jeopardized by the fray. At issue is how the county should pay a $5 million tab owed to the school system under Maryland's maintenance-of-effort law. "It'll probably be the last five million [dollars] the Board of Education gets in a long while," Councilman Jamie Benoit, a Democrat from Crownsville, told a school system representative during a public hearing Monday.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
Kharina Chapron, a senior at Hammond High School in Columbia whose parents are native Haitians, has been overwhelmed by the support her classmates have shown her since a major earthquake struck the country, causing widespread devastation and destruction. When a staff member learned that Chapron had such a close connection to the country, she decided to launch a fundraising effort at the school. As a result, students raised almost $400 in three days by donating money during lunch periods and class breaks.
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