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By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | July 26, 2006
The daring young men on the flying trapezes kick off from the ground, and for a moment, appear to achieve liftoff. There are three of them, and each grasps the bar with one hand while angling his remaining limbs in the shape of an arrow. Their forms, lit from above, are silhouetted against the black backdrop and ceiling. They swoosh around and around the Theatre Project stage, weaving in and out of each other's paths, creating a pattern as intricate as lace. If you go An open rehearsal of Expedition 6, written and directed by Bill Pullman, will be held at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St. Admission is free, but there is a suggested donation of $25. Reservations encouraged.
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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Baltimore native Jason Winer knows something about family comedy. He's been an executive producer on ABC's "Modern Family" and won a Directors Guild Award for his direction of the hit series' Emmy Award-winning pilot. This week, "1600 Penn," a family sitcom about a fictional first family that he co-created, joins NBC's Thursday night lineup. (A sneak preview of the pilot aired in December.) On Wednesday, Winer and the cast will be guests at the real White House where the series will be screened for President Obama.
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By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Talk about instant success. Baltimore native Jason Winer doesn't even have a name yet for his Hollywood production company. But he and his two co-creators, "The Book of Mormon" Broadway star Josh Gad and former White House speechwriter Jon Lovett, already have an order for 13 episodes of their first production, a new NBC sitcom titled "1600 Penn. " "I really don't know yet what it's going to be called," he says of the production company. "I'm mulling a number of names, but I honestly don't know.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Talk about instant success. Baltimore native Jason Winer doesn't even have a name yet for his Hollywood production company. But he and his two co-creators, "The Book of Mormon" Broadway star Josh Gad and former White House speechwriter Jon Lovett, already have an order for 13 episodes of their first production, a new NBC sitcom titled "1600 Penn. " "I really don't know yet what it's going to be called," he says of the production company. "I'm mulling a number of names, but I honestly don't know.
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By Los Angeles Times | March 28, 1991
''Past Midnight,'' shooting in Seattle, stars Rutger Hauer and Natasha Richardson in a psychological thriller about a social worker who befriends a client convicted of a heinous murder. Also shooting in Seattle is ''Singles'' for Warner Bros. Cameron Crowe follows "Say Anything" with this romantic comedy that looks at a group of young folks who alternately search for and run from that thing called love. Bridget Fonda, Campbell Scott, Kyra Sedgwick, Shella Kelly, Matt Dillon and Bill Pullman are in the cast.
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By Desmond Ryan and Desmond Ryan,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 1997
In "The End of Violence," German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas") has crafted a provocative work that is at its best in considering those who reap immense profits by purveying images of violence.The movie has its faults -- most notably in bending its plot and the behavior of its characters to support an appeal for radical changes in attitude -- but it is better than its release history suggested. It drew withering scorn at last spring's Cannes Film Festival, and Wenders drastically re-edited it.Bill Pullman plays an enormously successful Hollywood producer known for ultra-violent thrillers who ignores his bored wife (Andie MacDowell)
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
A 30-foot crocodile?A flying cow?A Golden Girl who curses like a "South Park" kid on crack?Who writes stuff like this, anyway? David E. Kelley, of course.No longer content to write some of the quirkiest material on television, Kelley has loosed his fateful pen on the screenplay of "Lake Placid," a thriller that is not quite as thrilling as it could be or as clever as it thinks it is.Don't misunderstand. "Lake Placid" has its share of terrifying moments. And Kelley is too accomplished a writer not to produce snappy dialogue from time to time.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 29, 1990
KIRSTIE ALLEY should make it from television to the big screen as long as she sticks to comedy. She's very good at it. She is particularly good at in ''Sibling Rivalry,'' a new comedy that was directed by Carl Reiner.Reiner, who didn't do too well with his last few films, is back on top with this one. It's funny throughout. Some of us might have preferred a different ending, but the ending Reiner does use is certainly good enough.Alley plays a neglected wife, married eight years to a doctor who pays her little mind.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 15, 2008
In a 1976 event that became known as "The Judgment of Paris," California wines beat French ones in a blind taste test. Bottle Shock wastes that intriguing bit of history and some seductive Napa Valley settings on a bland script that's part period piece, part underdog fable. Alan Rickman swans his way through the role of the expatriate Brit who sets up the contest with wine experts in Paris and then goes looking for the competition. Not even he can bring enough polish or pizazz to this ramble along the back roads of Northern California and through some stubborn pockets of the counterculture nine years after San Francisco's Summer of Love (and seven years after Woodstock)
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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 8, 2006
Growing up in Baltimore, Charlene Harris used to hear her father -- a bass player named Charles Harris who performed with Lionel Hampton and Nat King Cole -- talk about what it was like to perform in the South during the 1940s and 1950s. With most hotels and restaurants off limits to African-Americans, the musicians often stayed in the homes of black families but could still face discrimination on the road. South House, Charlene Harris' first play, is loosely inspired by her late father's experiences and features a band with the same name as his former group, Three Strikes and a Miss (although her father is not a character in the play)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 15, 2008
In a 1976 event that became known as "The Judgment of Paris," California wines beat French ones in a blind taste test. Bottle Shock wastes that intriguing bit of history and some seductive Napa Valley settings on a bland script that's part period piece, part underdog fable. Alan Rickman swans his way through the role of the expatriate Brit who sets up the contest with wine experts in Paris and then goes looking for the competition. Not even he can bring enough polish or pizazz to this ramble along the back roads of Northern California and through some stubborn pockets of the counterculture nine years after San Francisco's Summer of Love (and seven years after Woodstock)
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | July 26, 2006
The daring young men on the flying trapezes kick off from the ground, and for a moment, appear to achieve liftoff. There are three of them, and each grasps the bar with one hand while angling his remaining limbs in the shape of an arrow. Their forms, lit from above, are silhouetted against the black backdrop and ceiling. They swoosh around and around the Theatre Project stage, weaving in and out of each other's paths, creating a pattern as intricate as lace. If you go An open rehearsal of Expedition 6, written and directed by Bill Pullman, will be held at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St. Admission is free, but there is a suggested donation of $25. Reservations encouraged.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | July 20, 2006
This weekend, the city will be alive with visual and performing arts for the 25th Artscape. The festival includes hundreds of artists and craftspeople, visual art exhibits, live music on four stages, dance, opera, theater, fashion, film, hands-on activities, street theater and food and beverages from around the world. Several new activities will be on board this year to commemorate Artscape's 25th anniversary. Dance workshops, including line dancing, ballroom and swing partner dancing, will help guests pick up some new moves.
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By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 8, 2006
Growing up in Baltimore, Charlene Harris used to hear her father -- a bass player named Charles Harris who performed with Lionel Hampton and Nat King Cole -- talk about what it was like to perform in the South during the 1940s and 1950s. With most hotels and restaurants off limits to African-Americans, the musicians often stayed in the homes of black families but could still face discrimination on the road. South House, Charlene Harris' first play, is loosely inspired by her late father's experiences and features a band with the same name as his former group, Three Strikes and a Miss (although her father is not a character in the play)
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
In morality tales, the hero usually slides down some slippery ethical slope, suffers, and then climbs back up to the high ground after an over-dramatic epiphany. In "Lucky Numbers," though, all bets are off (pun fully intended). This darkly funny modern immorality fable with John Travolta as the altruistic, all-American-as-Boy-Scouts protagonist has a twist that preaches a tenet more along the lines of Wall Street's "Greed is good" - especially if you can get away with it. Directed by Nora Ephron (responsible for Meg Ryan vehicles "Sleepless in Seattle" and "You've Got Mail")
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
A 30-foot crocodile?A flying cow?A Golden Girl who curses like a "South Park" kid on crack?Who writes stuff like this, anyway? David E. Kelley, of course.No longer content to write some of the quirkiest material on television, Kelley has loosed his fateful pen on the screenplay of "Lake Placid," a thriller that is not quite as thrilling as it could be or as clever as it thinks it is.Don't misunderstand. "Lake Placid" has its share of terrifying moments. And Kelley is too accomplished a writer not to produce snappy dialogue from time to time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
Even after 40-plus years, Casper is still the friendliest ghost we know. And with treatment like this, it's not hard to see why.There's a lot of good news about "Casper," the latest high-tech effort from Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment colossus. Kids should love it, parents may even enjoy it, and film buffs will be both impressed by its technical expertise and amused by the references to old movies sprinkled throughout.For one thing, Casper, unlike most of us, hasn't grown more cynical over the years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 20, 1995
"The Last Seduction," which opens today at the Rotunda, certainly bears out the Biblical injunction that the last shall be first: It's the first good movie of the year. It may be the first good movie of last year. It's an archly ironic film noir that whirls along like a dervish on shore leave, teasing its own conventions exactly as it fulfills them.It's of the noir subset No. 7A -- the femme fatale -- built around a beautiful, predatory woman who has no moral compass, deploys her body as a lethal weapon, and uses the weaker sex as one might use tissue: to soak up fluids and to dispose of. Linda Fiorentino, briefly big years ago after "Vision Quest," is big all over again as sultry, leggy Bridget Gregory, a New Yorker married to a weak-willed physician (Bill Pullman)
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By Desmond Ryan and Desmond Ryan,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 1997
In "The End of Violence," German director Wim Wenders ("Paris, Texas") has crafted a provocative work that is at its best in considering those who reap immense profits by purveying images of violence.The movie has its faults -- most notably in bending its plot and the behavior of its characters to support an appeal for radical changes in attitude -- but it is better than its release history suggested. It drew withering scorn at last spring's Cannes Film Festival, and Wenders drastically re-edited it.Bill Pullman plays an enormously successful Hollywood producer known for ultra-violent thrillers who ignores his bored wife (Andie MacDowell)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
Even after 40-plus years, Casper is still the friendliest ghost we know. And with treatment like this, it's not hard to see why.There's a lot of good news about "Casper," the latest high-tech effort from Steven Spielberg's Amblin Entertainment colossus. Kids should love it, parents may even enjoy it, and film buffs will be both impressed by its technical expertise and amused by the references to old movies sprinkled throughout.For one thing, Casper, unlike most of us, hasn't grown more cynical over the years.
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