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By VITO STELLINO | February 7, 1993
It's become a corporate game now. Just ask Bill Polian.The Buffalo Bills' general manager was very good at building a football team. He wasn't very good at playing the corporate game. Which is why he's now the ex-general manager of the Bills.Polian was sacked four days after the Bills were blown out, 52-17, in the Super Bowl by the Dallas Cowboys, but he may have been gone even if his team had won the game.Ralph Wilson, the team owner, told him at the start of the year that he was planning to "restructure" the operation, which is the new euphemism for firing people.
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SPORTS
January 30, 2012
He might be done Sam Farmer Los Angeles Times From the day Peyton Manning had the fusion surgery in his neck, I've believed that he wouldn't play again. Not that I don't trust his resolve, because no player would work harder to get back on the field. The nature of that injury, and the fact that Manning has already had a Hall of Fame career and has a world of opportunities in front of him, lead me to believe he will pass on the risk of coming back. A surgeon who has performed hundreds of those one-level disk fusions told me that a person's range of motion in terms of turning the head is reduced by roughly 10 percent, and that cannot be good for a quarterback who needs to see as much of the field as he can. My guess — and I hope I'm wrong — is that Peyton is done.
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SPORTS
January 4, 2012
The time was right Sam Farmer Los Angeles Times Let's limit this to Bill Polian, as he was the true decision-maker here and Chris is clearly replaceable. Firing him was the right thing to do because the Colts need a fresh start and need to be as attractive and maleable as possible to attract the best next coach. With Polian there, an executive with arguably more power than any in the NFL, a new coach would be plugged in to that rigid pecking order. That won't work for everyone.
SPORTS
January 4, 2012
The time was right Sam Farmer Los Angeles Times Let's limit this to Bill Polian, as he was the true decision-maker here and Chris is clearly replaceable. Firing him was the right thing to do because the Colts need a fresh start and need to be as attractive and maleable as possible to attract the best next coach. With Polian there, an executive with arguably more power than any in the NFL, a new coach would be plugged in to that rigid pecking order. That won't work for everyone.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | January 17, 2009
Is this the changing of the guard, or is this just an aberration? Only time will tell. But the signs are pointing toward either the Ravens or the Pittsburgh Steelers - or both - being the teams to beat in the NFL in the foreseeable future. In other words, tomorrow won't be the last time these two teams play for the AFC championship, or are the ones others have to go through to get there. Kind of how the New England Patriots and Indianapolis Colts have been. At this rate, based on what has happened this month, those two - the league's marquee teams and the ones in the spotlight at the beginning of nearly every postseason this decade - are becoming the pursuers instead of the pursued.
SPORTS
January 30, 2012
He might be done Sam Farmer Los Angeles Times From the day Peyton Manning had the fusion surgery in his neck, I've believed that he wouldn't play again. Not that I don't trust his resolve, because no player would work harder to get back on the field. The nature of that injury, and the fact that Manning has already had a Hall of Fame career and has a world of opportunities in front of him, lead me to believe he will pass on the risk of coming back. A surgeon who has performed hundreds of those one-level disk fusions told me that a person's range of motion in terms of turning the head is reduced by roughly 10 percent, and that cannot be good for a quarterback who needs to see as much of the field as he can. My guess — and I hope I'm wrong — is that Peyton is done.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1998
ANDERSON, Ind. -- Bill Polian has a striking track record when it comes to building teams from the ground up in the NFL. He was the architect of both the Buffalo Bills' four-year AFC dynasty and the Carolina Panthers' two-year rise to the NFC championship game.Now comes perhaps his most difficult challenge. As president of the Indianapolis Colts, he is attempting to resuscitate a franchise that has won only two playoff games in its past 26 years.Hired by owner Jim Irsay one day after the Colts' 3-13 season ended last December, Polian, 55, doesn't minimize the job that faces him."
SPORTS
By Phil Richards, The Indianapolis Star | December 9, 2011
INDIANAPOLIS -- Jerome Felton grew up in Madison, Tenn., less than an hour's drive from Knoxville. So it's not surprising he was a fan of the University of Tennessee and its All-American quarterback or that when Peyton Manning moved on to the Indianapolis Colts, Felton began keeping a close eye on them. He noticed something: no fullback. “I was definitely surprised when my agent called and told me the Colts wanted me,” said Felton, a four-year NFL fullback who was released by Carolina two weeks before the Colts called.
SPORTS
September 14, 2011
Tanking season absurd Kevin Van Valkenburg Baltimore Sun Anyone who thinks the Colts should essentially tank this season to position themselves in the Andrew Luck sweepstakes is being completely naive. If Indianapolis really wants Luck and they're not in a position to draft him in 2012, they should just offer whatever it takes to get him. But suggesting they throw the season is absurd. And doing it might even be illegal. Imagine the gambling implications alone if Joseph Addai decided to start intentionally fumbling whenever he sniffed the end zone.
NEWS
The Sports Xchange | September 8, 2011
Peyton Manning underwent cervical fusion surgery Thursday and is out for up to three months, ESPN's Chris Mortensen reported. Manning had been recovering from neck surgery in May, the second such procedure in the past two years, and was ruled out for Sunday's season opener at Houston. It's the first time in his 227-game career Manning won't play. His recovery, dependent on regeneration of nerves in the neck, was going slower than expected. That helped necessitate Thursday's operation, which carries a minimum recovery time of 2-3 months.
SPORTS
By Phil Richards, The Indianapolis Star | December 9, 2011
INDIANAPOLIS -- Jerome Felton grew up in Madison, Tenn., less than an hour's drive from Knoxville. So it's not surprising he was a fan of the University of Tennessee and its All-American quarterback or that when Peyton Manning moved on to the Indianapolis Colts, Felton began keeping a close eye on them. He noticed something: no fullback. “I was definitely surprised when my agent called and told me the Colts wanted me,” said Felton, a four-year NFL fullback who was released by Carolina two weeks before the Colts called.
SPORTS
September 14, 2011
Tanking season absurd Kevin Van Valkenburg Baltimore Sun Anyone who thinks the Colts should essentially tank this season to position themselves in the Andrew Luck sweepstakes is being completely naive. If Indianapolis really wants Luck and they're not in a position to draft him in 2012, they should just offer whatever it takes to get him. But suggesting they throw the season is absurd. And doing it might even be illegal. Imagine the gambling implications alone if Joseph Addai decided to start intentionally fumbling whenever he sniffed the end zone.
NEWS
The Sports Xchange | September 8, 2011
Peyton Manning underwent cervical fusion surgery Thursday and is out for up to three months, ESPN's Chris Mortensen reported. Manning had been recovering from neck surgery in May, the second such procedure in the past two years, and was ruled out for Sunday's season opener at Houston. It's the first time in his 227-game career Manning won't play. His recovery, dependent on regeneration of nerves in the neck, was going slower than expected. That helped necessitate Thursday's operation, which carries a minimum recovery time of 2-3 months.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE and DAVID STEELE,david.steele@baltsun.com | January 17, 2009
Is this the changing of the guard, or is this just an aberration? Only time will tell. But the signs are pointing toward either the Ravens or the Pittsburgh Steelers - or both - being the teams to beat in the NFL in the foreseeable future. In other words, tomorrow won't be the last time these two teams play for the AFC championship, or are the ones others have to go through to get there. Kind of how the New England Patriots and Indianapolis Colts have been. At this rate, based on what has happened this month, those two - the league's marquee teams and the ones in the spotlight at the beginning of nearly every postseason this decade - are becoming the pursuers instead of the pursued.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1998
ANDERSON, Ind. -- Bill Polian has a striking track record when it comes to building teams from the ground up in the NFL. He was the architect of both the Buffalo Bills' four-year AFC dynasty and the Carolina Panthers' two-year rise to the NFC championship game.Now comes perhaps his most difficult challenge. As president of the Indianapolis Colts, he is attempting to resuscitate a franchise that has won only two playoff games in its past 26 years.Hired by owner Jim Irsay one day after the Colts' 3-13 season ended last December, Polian, 55, doesn't minimize the job that faces him."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1998
ANDERSON, Ind. -- There were enough warning signs to scare off less secure quarterbacks than Peyton Manning. There was reason to wonder whether coming to Indianapolis to revive the comatose Colts was a good idea at any price.All you had to do was listen to the echoes of the past.There was the club's wretched history of taking quarterbacks high in the draft, starting with Art Schlichter in 1982. The John Elway saga followed a year later, and in 1990, the Colts tried again with Jeff George.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1998
ANDERSON, Ind. -- There were enough warning signs to scare off less secure quarterbacks than Peyton Manning. There was reason to wonder whether coming to Indianapolis to revive the comatose Colts was a good idea at any price.All you had to do was listen to the echoes of the past.There was the club's wretched history of taking quarterbacks high in the draft, starting with Art Schlichter in 1982. The John Elway saga followed a year later, and in 1990, the Colts tried again with Jeff George.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | October 8, 1993
Maneuvering to strengthen its position against all opposition, Baltimore, in endeavoring to acquire an NFL expansion team, has moved into what might be appropriately called the "two-minute drill."The clock is running.Next Wednesday in Chicago there's an NFL meeting and 13 days after that a verdict will be known -- whether Baltimore is in or out and whether Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, Malcolm Glazer, or a still-unannounced third group surfaces.It's doubtful that the NFL, in deference to Weinglass or Glazer, would ask a would-be owner in any of the other four contending cities to switch allegiance and come to Baltimore.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
In the calm before the NFL's 78th season, inventory is taken to see who has the edge on whom, where the kingpins will reside and who the doormats will be.Some conclusions are more obvious than others.The Carolina Panthers' drive to the NFC championship game last season apparently panicked the NFC West. The four other teams in the division all changed coaches in the wake of Carolina's incredible second-year success. Panthers coach Dom Capers, with all of two years under his belt, is senior man in the division.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | January 15, 1994
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. -- This is where it started three years ago. In frigid Rich Stadium, in the midst of a Buffalo blizzard, against the shivering Los Angeles Raiders.When the Buffalo Bills pulverized the Raiders on Jan. 20, 1991, their 51-3 victory not only propelled them into Super Bowl XXV, but it also signaled the start of an AFC dynasty.This is where it could end, too. In snow-packed Rich Stadium, in arctic conditions, against the Raiders.The Bills' three-year dynasty, perhaps never more vulnerable, is on the line today when they tangle with the Raiders in a second-round AFC playoff game.
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