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By Amy Watts, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Mirrorball Madness is back, baby! They waste no time going straight to the competitive routines after a brief welcome from Tom and Brooke following the opening number.   Brant Daugherty  & Peta Murgatroyd Cha cha Brant describes himself as a "single threat" because he can't sing or dance. Who knew he could be pretty AND funny? They appear to be dancing to the recorded version of "Blurred Lines. "  WHAT HAVE THEY DONE WITH HAROLD WHEELER? ACK. They've moved the judges' stand to the opposite of the dance floor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
It's "Hollywood Night" which of course means an opening number to a Bjork song. Bill Nye has a "badly torn tendon" in his leg. I bet that's him out. Leah Remini & Tony Dovolani Rumba "Skyfall," from the James Bond film of the same name, originally sung by Adele Len loved the chemistry but would've liked to see more fluidity in her arms. Bruno likes that she left her comfort zone but agrees with Len's critique of her arms. Carrie Ann disagrees about the arms but points out a particular move that didn't go as it should.
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NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2000
Jacqueline Jenkins-Nye, who was recruited out of Goucher College by the Navy to help crack codes used by the Japanese and Germans during World War II, but whose contribution to science might be more recognized by children who have seen her television-personality son, died Thursday. The Baltimore native was 79. She died at George Washington Hospital in Washington of cancer. Long a resident of Arlington, Va., the mother of three was born in Durham, N.C. She moved to Baltimore at an early age, when her father accepted a position as a chemistry professor at the Johns Hopkins University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Mirrorball Madness is back, baby! They waste no time going straight to the competitive routines after a brief welcome from Tom and Brooke following the opening number.   Brant Daugherty  & Peta Murgatroyd Cha cha Brant describes himself as a "single threat" because he can't sing or dance. Who knew he could be pretty AND funny? They appear to be dancing to the recorded version of "Blurred Lines. "  WHAT HAVE THEY DONE WITH HAROLD WHEELER? ACK. They've moved the judges' stand to the opposite of the dance floor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By The Hollywood Reporter | September 1, 1995
Tim Allen, Bill Nye and Goofy will share a home on the Internet beginning today with the launch of the first on-line World Wide Web site from the Walt Disney TV groups.Like other recently launched sites from the TV divisions of Paramount, Sony and other studios, Disney's Internet site (http://www.disney.com/TVplex) is designed for promotion and publicity. Video clips, theme songs, program schedules and other information will be available for more than 30 series and specials produced by Disney, Touchstone and Buena Vista Television.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
Welcome to a night of returning classics: two regulars from the original "Dick Van Dyke Show" return to prime time; Rod Steiger reprises (sort of) one of his most memorable roles; that know-it-all mail guy, Cliff Clavin, shows up on PBS; and possibly the finest "ER" yet gets a repeat showing on NBC.* "Bill Nye the Science Guy" (5:30 p.m.-6 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Cliff, the mailman from "Cheers," and Bill Nye have it out over dinosaurs. PBS.* "The Commish: Redemption" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1995
Washington -- Bill Nye is in his element.On a molten Thursday in Washington, Bill bounds through his favorite shrine to science, the National Air and Space Museum. Hanging from the heavens of this great museum is evidence of how science has triumphed, how science has ruled. Mercury, Apollo, Sputnik, The Spirit of St. Louis.For years, Bill came here as just another guy. Not anymore."That's Bill Nye the Science Guy!" people say, stunning him. "Science rules!" Bill answers in his mantra.Bill, a former Boeing engineer and stand-up comic, has parlayed a passionate interest in science into "Bill Nye The Science Guy," which airs 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, on Maryland Public Television.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2013
It's "Hollywood Night" which of course means an opening number to a Bjork song. Bill Nye has a "badly torn tendon" in his leg. I bet that's him out. Leah Remini & Tony Dovolani Rumba "Skyfall," from the James Bond film of the same name, originally sung by Adele Len loved the chemistry but would've liked to see more fluidity in her arms. Bruno likes that she left her comfort zone but agrees with Len's critique of her arms. Carrie Ann disagrees about the arms but points out a particular move that didn't go as it should.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 29, 1996
PASADENA, Calif. -- After some intense last-minute deal-making, President Clinton is expected to tell panelists at his White House summit on children's television today that an on-again, off-again plan to provide more and better educational programming for kids is back on track.The plan, which would require all television stations to carry three hours of educational programming a week as a condition of license renewal, was thought to be dead Friday by many children's advocates, broadcasters and even some at the Federal Communications Commission.
NEWS
By Kathryn McKenzie Nichols and Kathryn McKenzie Nichols,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 7, 1999
Bill Nye the Science Guy, for all his reputation as a funnyman, is quite serious when he talks about something near and dear to his heart. We're talking toys -- gyroscopes, to be exact. "It's got to be durable," Nye expounded. "It's got to be built so the spindle never jumps out of the cage. That's what I used to hate when I was a kid." Nye's exacting standards have now been applied to a new line of toys, one of which is Bill Nye's Extreme Gyro. The gyroscope -- sort of a metallic top that, when spinning, can do nifty tricks -- is made by Tedco, the same Ohio company that's been making gyroscopes since 1917.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2000
Jacqueline Jenkins-Nye, who was recruited out of Goucher College by the Navy to help crack codes used by the Japanese and Germans during World War II, but whose contribution to science might be more recognized by children who have seen her television-personality son, died Thursday. The Baltimore native was 79. She died at George Washington Hospital in Washington of cancer. Long a resident of Arlington, Va., the mother of three was born in Durham, N.C. She moved to Baltimore at an early age, when her father accepted a position as a chemistry professor at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Kathryn McKenzie Nichols and Kathryn McKenzie Nichols,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 7, 1999
Bill Nye the Science Guy, for all his reputation as a funnyman, is quite serious when he talks about something near and dear to his heart. We're talking toys -- gyroscopes, to be exact. "It's got to be durable," Nye expounded. "It's got to be built so the spindle never jumps out of the cage. That's what I used to hate when I was a kid." Nye's exacting standards have now been applied to a new line of toys, one of which is Bill Nye's Extreme Gyro. The gyroscope -- sort of a metallic top that, when spinning, can do nifty tricks -- is made by Tedco, the same Ohio company that's been making gyroscopes since 1917.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 29, 1996
PASADENA, Calif. -- After some intense last-minute deal-making, President Clinton is expected to tell panelists at his White House summit on children's television today that an on-again, off-again plan to provide more and better educational programming for kids is back on track.The plan, which would require all television stations to carry three hours of educational programming a week as a condition of license renewal, was thought to be dead Friday by many children's advocates, broadcasters and even some at the Federal Communications Commission.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1996
Welcome to a night of returning classics: two regulars from the original "Dick Van Dyke Show" return to prime time; Rod Steiger reprises (sort of) one of his most memorable roles; that know-it-all mail guy, Cliff Clavin, shows up on PBS; and possibly the finest "ER" yet gets a repeat showing on NBC.* "Bill Nye the Science Guy" (5:30 p.m.-6 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Cliff, the mailman from "Cheers," and Bill Nye have it out over dinosaurs. PBS.* "The Commish: Redemption" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
ENTERTAINMENT
By The Hollywood Reporter | September 1, 1995
Tim Allen, Bill Nye and Goofy will share a home on the Internet beginning today with the launch of the first on-line World Wide Web site from the Walt Disney TV groups.Like other recently launched sites from the TV divisions of Paramount, Sony and other studios, Disney's Internet site (http://www.disney.com/TVplex) is designed for promotion and publicity. Video clips, theme songs, program schedules and other information will be available for more than 30 series and specials produced by Disney, Touchstone and Buena Vista Television.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1995
Washington -- Bill Nye is in his element.On a molten Thursday in Washington, Bill bounds through his favorite shrine to science, the National Air and Space Museum. Hanging from the heavens of this great museum is evidence of how science has triumphed, how science has ruled. Mercury, Apollo, Sputnik, The Spirit of St. Louis.For years, Bill came here as just another guy. Not anymore."That's Bill Nye the Science Guy!" people say, stunning him. "Science rules!" Bill answers in his mantra.Bill, a former Boeing engineer and stand-up comic, has parlayed a passionate interest in science into "Bill Nye The Science Guy," which airs 5:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, on Maryland Public Television.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | July 22, 2007
Running out of things to do with the kids this summer? Get a copy of Camp Out! The Ultimate Kids' Guide, and, as the bouncer might say, step outside. The book ($11.95; Workman Publishing) has tons of great backyard and camping activities for ages 7 and up. Author Lynn Brunelle, a writer for TV's Bill Nye, the Science Guy, answers questions for tenderfeet and Grizzly Adams types alike, teaches all kinds of cool skills - making a solar oven out of a pizza box comes to mind - and suggests things to do when just being outdoors gets dull.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2003
SEATTLE - Mars is about to be invaded by three successive spacecraft carrying sophisticated scientific instruments, six-wheeled robotic "rovers" and two sundials from Seattle. The planned landing on Christmas Day of Britain's Beagle 2 will be followed by two NASA probes, Spirit and Opportunity, which will land in January. The general purpose of the missions is to find evidence of life, or past life. What does a sundial have to do with this and why on Earth would it come from soggy, cloudy Seattle?
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