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By Jon Pareles and Jon Pareles,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 10, 1996
Bill Monroe, who laid the foundation of country music as the universally recognized father of bluegrass, died yesterday at Northcrest Home and Hospice Center in Springfield, Tenn. He was 84.He had suffered a stroke earlier this year, said his booking agent, Tony Conway.Monroe, who played mandolin and sang in a high, plaintive tenor voice, created one of the most durable idioms in American music.Bluegrass, named after his band, the Blue Grass Boys, was a fusion of American music: gospel harmonies and Celtic fiddling, blues and folk songs, Tin Pan Alley pop and jazz-tinged improvisations.
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NEWS
By STEVE CUNNINGHAM | August 16, 2000
OK. Baltimore Bluegrass has closed. That's disappointing to many customers, but the success of the store reflected the continued beauty of Belair Road in Northeast Baltimore and surrounding neighborhoods. Many people assume the worst when long-standing institutions such as Baltimore Bluegrass music store or Bo Brooks restaurant leave the area. It's a knee-jerk reaction resulting from media attention to the nasty and nefarious instead of the upbeat side of human nature. Add to this the ever-constant change of demographics, a process common to any area, and one might perceive decimation when change happens either inside or outside the beltway.
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NEWS
September 11, 1996
THE MUSIC OF Bill Monroe, who died this week at the age of 84, was born in the rolling bluegrass hills of his native Kentucky. By fusing rhythmic and melodic elements of country, gospel, Celtic fiddling, blues and yodeling, he created a unique genre that developed a cult following, particularly among younger white urbanites yearning to relive the simpler times of America's past.During a career that spanned 62 years, Bill Monroe sold more than 50 million records and mentored scores of musicians who turned bluegrass music into a worldwide phenomenon.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff | July 12, 1999
An 11-year-old fiddler, banjo music and a Kiowa-Comanche Indian blues singer helped set the mood yesterday to close out the second American Music & Arts Festival at the Carroll County Farm Museum.The two-day event also marked the finale of the Common Ground on the Hill program at Western Maryland College, where about 370 students spent a week with 110 artists from around the world.They were celebrating "the common ground found in the traditional arts," according to Walt Michael, a musician and the college's artist in residence, who founded Common Ground five years ago.Michael said he's learned that 90 percent of the people coming to the classes and the festival were inspired by word of mouth.
NEWS
By STEVE CUNNINGHAM | August 16, 2000
OK. Baltimore Bluegrass has closed. That's disappointing to many customers, but the success of the store reflected the continued beauty of Belair Road in Northeast Baltimore and surrounding neighborhoods. Many people assume the worst when long-standing institutions such as Baltimore Bluegrass music store or Bo Brooks restaurant leave the area. It's a knee-jerk reaction resulting from media attention to the nasty and nefarious instead of the upbeat side of human nature. Add to this the ever-constant change of demographics, a process common to any area, and one might perceive decimation when change happens either inside or outside the beltway.
FEATURES
By Bob Allen and Bob Allen,Special to The Evening Sun | August 28, 1991
RICKY SKAGGS may have made his commercial mark in mainstream country music, but his roots have always been solidly anchored in bluegrass: the high-lonesome, hard-driving, acoustic mountain music pioneered by legendary artists like Bill Monroe and Ralph Stanley.Skaggs' emotional and spiritual connection to the bluegrass idiom has never been more dramatically or lovingly presented than it was at "The Ricky Skaggs Pickin' Party," a four-hour musical extravaganza at Pier Six Pavilion last night.
NEWS
September 18, 1996
Parents can control teen-age drug useI am appalled that parents of teen-agers believe that they do not have influence over their children not to experiment with drugs. If that is true, what is the purpose of parents?Children learn their values from their parents, church, school and others. If this is true, then that answers why drug usage by teen agers has soared in the last four years.Perhaps what we need to do is hold class on parents rather than teen-agers.When I was commanding officer of the Marine Barracks in Washington, I had over 1,000 men and women under my command.
FEATURES
By Bob Allen and Bob Allen,Special to The Sun | August 11, 1994
Despite its ties to more archaic strains of folk music, bluegrass music is one of the few styles of popular American music whose origins can be traced back to one specific era (the late 1940s) and one specific group of musicians who forged it from the mountain-style string-band music, gospel and blues that they'd been raised on. Most notably, that's Bill Monroe and his band, which for a time included banjo legend Earl Scruggs and guitarist Lester Flatt.Though he was not present at that creation, bluegrass legend Ralph Stanley was not far behind.
NEWS
By MICHELLE HOFFMAN | July 14, 1994
Today's hip country sounds have America up and dancing. Whether it's the "Achy Breaky," the "Boot Scootin' Boogie," the "Cheatin' Heart," the "Cowboy Hip Hop," the "Tush Push" or any number of others, the hip hop sound of 1990s pop country music can make even the most shaded of wallflowers start their toes a-tappin'.It seems as though when Brooks and Dunn, Billy Ray Cyrus and Garth Brooks, among others, hit the scene, country music found many "Friends in Low Places" it did not know about.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff | July 12, 1999
An 11-year-old fiddler, banjo music and a Kiowa-Comanche Indian blues singer helped set the mood yesterday to close out the second American Music & Arts Festival at the Carroll County Farm Museum.The two-day event also marked the finale of the Common Ground on the Hill program at Western Maryland College, where about 370 students spent a week with 110 artists from around the world.They were celebrating "the common ground found in the traditional arts," according to Walt Michael, a musician and the college's artist in residence, who founded Common Ground five years ago.Michael said he's learned that 90 percent of the people coming to the classes and the festival were inspired by word of mouth.
NEWS
September 18, 1996
Parents can control teen-age drug useI am appalled that parents of teen-agers believe that they do not have influence over their children not to experiment with drugs. If that is true, what is the purpose of parents?Children learn their values from their parents, church, school and others. If this is true, then that answers why drug usage by teen agers has soared in the last four years.Perhaps what we need to do is hold class on parents rather than teen-agers.When I was commanding officer of the Marine Barracks in Washington, I had over 1,000 men and women under my command.
NEWS
September 11, 1996
THE MUSIC OF Bill Monroe, who died this week at the age of 84, was born in the rolling bluegrass hills of his native Kentucky. By fusing rhythmic and melodic elements of country, gospel, Celtic fiddling, blues and yodeling, he created a unique genre that developed a cult following, particularly among younger white urbanites yearning to relive the simpler times of America's past.During a career that spanned 62 years, Bill Monroe sold more than 50 million records and mentored scores of musicians who turned bluegrass music into a worldwide phenomenon.
NEWS
By Jon Pareles and Jon Pareles,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 10, 1996
Bill Monroe, who laid the foundation of country music as the universally recognized father of bluegrass, died yesterday at Northcrest Home and Hospice Center in Springfield, Tenn. He was 84.He had suffered a stroke earlier this year, said his booking agent, Tony Conway.Monroe, who played mandolin and sang in a high, plaintive tenor voice, created one of the most durable idioms in American music.Bluegrass, named after his band, the Blue Grass Boys, was a fusion of American music: gospel harmonies and Celtic fiddling, blues and folk songs, Tin Pan Alley pop and jazz-tinged improvisations.
FEATURES
By Bob Allen and Bob Allen,Special to The Sun | August 11, 1994
Despite its ties to more archaic strains of folk music, bluegrass music is one of the few styles of popular American music whose origins can be traced back to one specific era (the late 1940s) and one specific group of musicians who forged it from the mountain-style string-band music, gospel and blues that they'd been raised on. Most notably, that's Bill Monroe and his band, which for a time included banjo legend Earl Scruggs and guitarist Lester Flatt.Though he was not present at that creation, bluegrass legend Ralph Stanley was not far behind.
NEWS
By MICHELLE HOFFMAN | July 14, 1994
Today's hip country sounds have America up and dancing. Whether it's the "Achy Breaky," the "Boot Scootin' Boogie," the "Cheatin' Heart," the "Cowboy Hip Hop," the "Tush Push" or any number of others, the hip hop sound of 1990s pop country music can make even the most shaded of wallflowers start their toes a-tappin'.It seems as though when Brooks and Dunn, Billy Ray Cyrus and Garth Brooks, among others, hit the scene, country music found many "Friends in Low Places" it did not know about.
FEATURES
By Bob Allen and Bob Allen,Special to The Evening Sun | August 28, 1991
RICKY SKAGGS may have made his commercial mark in mainstream country music, but his roots have always been solidly anchored in bluegrass: the high-lonesome, hard-driving, acoustic mountain music pioneered by legendary artists like Bill Monroe and Ralph Stanley.Skaggs' emotional and spiritual connection to the bluegrass idiom has never been more dramatically or lovingly presented than it was at "The Ricky Skaggs Pickin' Party," a four-hour musical extravaganza at Pier Six Pavilion last night.
NEWS
July 11, 1991
Bill Monroe, former NBC news executive and correspondent, this week announced his retirement from the Washington Journalism Review, effective Dec. 31. He will serve as editor until a successor takes over this fall.Monroe, 70, has been editor of the review since 1987. The national monthly magazine of print and broadcast journalism has a circulation of about 30,000, the WJR said.WJR was given to the University of Maryland at College Park in 1987 by Henry and Jessica Catto. The editor and publisher now report to Reese Cleghorn, dean of the College of Journalism.
NEWS
February 5, 2006
Moira Shearer, 80, the ballerina and actress whose debut film, The Red Shoes, created an international sensation in 1948, died Tuesday at a hospital in Oxford, England. No cause of death was given. Ms. Shearer, born in Dunfermline, Scotland, became principal dancer at London's famous Sadler's Wells in 1942 and won her first major role in 1946, playing Sleeping Beauty at London's Royal Opera House. A stunning redhead, she won the role of the doomed dancer Victoria in The Red Shoes, directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger.
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