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NEWS
By NICOLE GAOUETTE and NICOLE GAOUETTE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Breaking a weeks-long partisan deadlock, Senate leaders announced an agreement yesterday to resume debate on legislation that would provide legal status to millions of undocumented immigrants, create a guest worker program and bolster border security. The agreement gives new momentum to a bill that seemed on the verge of Senate approval before collapsing in early April amid partisan bickering. Senate leaders said debate would start Monday, with the Senate aiming to pass legislation by Memorial Day. Still, prospects for the bill are uncertain because a large group of House Republicans opposes a guest worker plan and enhanced legal status for illegal immigrants.
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NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 6, 2008
Marc Steiner's out, Nancy Grasmick's in, Martin O'Malley is letting a bygone be bygone, and street thugs are resting two whole days, on average, between murders. Where am I, and why am I here? Last I knew, this was a place with an authentic Baltimore voice on NPR (albeit one that commutes from Sparks). With a state schools superintendent who was being pushed out and a governor who held killer grudges. With murderers who spent Januarys snuffing out lives at a rate of one a day. What accounts for this sudden burst of public radio upheaval, political maturity and homicidal sloth?
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - With lawmakers returning from the Memorial Day recess, the Senate majority leader, Bill Frist, faces a crucial test of whether he can re-establish his authority after a rapid sequence of events that many say diminished his standing and exposed a lack of experience in congressional intrigue. Adversaries, independent analysts and even some allies say the Senate leader was wounded by a compromise on judicial nominees achieved last month by a handful of Republicans who bucked him, including Sen. John McCain, a potential presidential rival in 2008.
NEWS
By NICOLE GAOUETTE and NICOLE GAOUETTE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Breaking a weeks-long partisan deadlock, Senate leaders announced an agreement yesterday to resume debate on legislation that would provide legal status to millions of undocumented immigrants, create a guest worker program and bolster border security. The agreement gives new momentum to a bill that seemed on the verge of Senate approval before collapsing in early April amid partisan bickering. Senate leaders said debate would start Monday, with the Senate aiming to pass legislation by Memorial Day. Still, prospects for the bill are uncertain because a large group of House Republicans opposes a guest worker plan and enhanced legal status for illegal immigrants.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 19, 2001
WASHINGTON - Sen. Bill Frist's emergency medical skills have been called upon repeatedly during his seven years in the Senate. He resuscitated a constituent who had a heart attack on the way to his Senate office in 1995, treated the wounded in the 1998 Capitol shooting and rushed to examine 98-year-old Strom Thurmond after his recent collapse on the Senate floor. But the anthrax scare on Capitol Hill is giving Frist, a heart transplant surgeon, his first chance to show off his bedside manner.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 20, 2002
WASHINGTON - Sen. Bill Frist of Tennessee is poised to challenge Sen. Trent Lott of Mississippi for Lott's post of Senate Republican leader, he announced last night after a handful of influential senators threw their support behind him. Frist's announcement dealt a serious blow to Lott's intensive campaign to keep his post as majority leader. It came as Lott waged a behind-the-scenes effort to garner the 26 votes he would need. After Frist's statement last night, Lott vowed to continue fighting for his leadership job. Having spent days declining to comment on a potential leadership battle, Frist - a close ally of President Bush and a rising Republican star - said he had decided to challenge Lott if enough of the 50 other Republican senators asked him to. After speaking with supporters, Frist said, "I indicated to them that if it is clear that a majority of the Republican caucus believes a change in leadership would benefit the institution of the United States Senate, I will likely step forward for that role."
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 22, 2002
WASHINGTON - Sen. Bill Frist of Tennessee, the telegenic heart surgeon from Nashville who is poised to become Senate majority leader, seems to have made a career of being pressed into service. A world-renowned physician who studied at Princeton and Harvard universities, he gave up an exciting and lucrative practice in 1994 to wrest a Senate seat from a powerful Democrat, 18-year veteran James R. Sasser. When Republicans needed an energetic cheerleader and fund-raiser to plot a winning strategy to take back the Senate this year, Frist stepped up and delivered.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - Just days after a bipartisan group of senators agreed to defuse a standoff over judicial confirmations, Sen. Bill Frist, the majority leader, found a new tool for interpreting their compromise: a Magic 8 Ball, the fortune-telling toy. Mocking the agreement's provision that Democrats can block judicial nominees in "extraordinary circumstances," Frist suggested in a speech Wednesday that the Democratic leaders might gather around a Magic 8...
NEWS
December 29, 2002
THE NEW PARTNERSHIP of George W. Bush and Bill Frist is well positioned to boost the neglected softer side of the Republican agenda. President Bush, who campaigned as a compassionate conservative in 2000, has mostly failed to translate that slogan into policy so far. A balky Congress has been partly to blame. But the president also lost his focus on domestic issues after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. His core Republican voters got a hefty tax cut, and an education bill went through without enough money to pay for it. But that has been about it. With his 2004 re-election race looming, Mr. Bush is certain to reach out again to moderates.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Senate majority leader, Bill Frist, aligned himself with President Bush today when he said that the theory of "intelligent design" should be taught along with evolution in public schools. Teaching intelligent design as well as evolution "doesn't force any particular theory on anyone," Frist, a Tennessee Republican, said in Nashville, according to the Associated Press. "I think in a pluralistic society that is the fairest way to go about education and training people for the future."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Senate majority leader, Bill Frist, aligned himself with President Bush today when he said that the theory of "intelligent design" should be taught along with evolution in public schools. Teaching intelligent design as well as evolution "doesn't force any particular theory on anyone," Frist, a Tennessee Republican, said in Nashville, according to the Associated Press. "I think in a pluralistic society that is the fairest way to go about education and training people for the future."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - With lawmakers returning from the Memorial Day recess, the Senate majority leader, Bill Frist, faces a crucial test of whether he can re-establish his authority after a rapid sequence of events that many say diminished his standing and exposed a lack of experience in congressional intrigue. Adversaries, independent analysts and even some allies say the Senate leader was wounded by a compromise on judicial nominees achieved last month by a handful of Republicans who bucked him, including Sen. John McCain, a potential presidential rival in 2008.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - Just days after a bipartisan group of senators agreed to defuse a standoff over judicial confirmations, Sen. Bill Frist, the majority leader, found a new tool for interpreting their compromise: a Magic 8 Ball, the fortune-telling toy. Mocking the agreement's provision that Democrats can block judicial nominees in "extraordinary circumstances," Frist suggested in a speech Wednesday that the Democratic leaders might gather around a Magic 8...
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - Bill Frist and Harry Reid opened the Senate yesterday morning as they do nearly every day - standing on opposite sides of the aisle in a nearly empty chamber. But on this day, the Republican and Democratic leaders were taking the first steps in a parliamentary dance that could end in a showdown over the filibuster - a technique that enables the minority to thwart the majority - and throw the famously collegial body into chaos. The reserved tones that are the trademark of both men belied the high stakes of this debate: While it will take several days to reach a vote to eliminate the filibuster, the argument has been building for years, fanned by rising partisanship and pressure from outside the civilized confines of the Senate.
NEWS
July 11, 2003
Our basic rights do not depend on state politics So Gregory Kane thinks our "right to privacy" does not exist in the Constitution ("Justices' rulings overlook importance of states' rights," July 6). It is incredible that anyone would argue that this fundamental right is not protected by our Constitution. The Constitution was not written to list explicitly every single right that we have (see the Ninth Amendment, which says, "The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people")
TOPIC
July 6, 2003
The World U.S. forces returned five Syrian border guards who were wounded in a raid on a convoy to Syria that was thought to be carrying high-ranking officials of Saddam Hussein's regime, possibly Hussein himself. President Bush told Americans to be prepared for a "massive and long-term" role in Iraq. Vancouver, British Columbia, was picked for the 2010 Winter Games by the International Olympic Committee. A powerful explosion in a mosque in the Iraqi city of Fallujah killed an outspoken anti-American Sunni Muslim cleric and six students.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 6, 2002
WASHINGTON - After closing out a torrid campaign swing, visiting 15 states in a week to try to give a last-minute boost to Republican candidates, President Bush did yesterday what any political junkie might do: He awoke, voted at the local firehouse and settled in to watch election returns into the night. Bush made an enormous personal investment in many races, putting his reputation on the line by repeatedly visiting such states as South Dakota, Missouri and Minnesota to try to influence tight Senate races.
TOPIC
July 6, 2003
The World U.S. forces returned five Syrian border guards who were wounded in a raid on a convoy to Syria that was thought to be carrying high-ranking officials of Saddam Hussein's regime, possibly Hussein himself. President Bush told Americans to be prepared for a "massive and long-term" role in Iraq. Vancouver, British Columbia, was picked for the 2010 Winter Games by the International Olympic Committee. A powerful explosion in a mosque in the Iraqi city of Fallujah killed an outspoken anti-American Sunni Muslim cleric and six students.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - As the Senate opens debate today on a measure to add a prescription drug benefit to Medicare, perhaps nobody has more at stake than Bill Frist, the majority leader and heart surgeon who keeps his medical bag in his Capitol office at all times. It is Frist, the Tennessee Republican whom President Bush calls "Doc," who has demanded that senior lawmakers move quickly to draft the $400 billion Medicare drug measure. It was he who set an ambitious schedule that put the Senate on course to pass the bill - the most far-reaching and expensive change to Medicare, the health program for the elderly and disabled, in its 38-year history - by July 4. And with senior citizens clamoring for Medicare to help pay for their medicines, it is in large part up to Frist to deliver an accomplishment that could aid Bush's re-election campaign and his own party's electoral fortunes.
NEWS
December 29, 2002
THE NEW PARTNERSHIP of George W. Bush and Bill Frist is well positioned to boost the neglected softer side of the Republican agenda. President Bush, who campaigned as a compassionate conservative in 2000, has mostly failed to translate that slogan into policy so far. A balky Congress has been partly to blame. But the president also lost his focus on domestic issues after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. His core Republican voters got a hefty tax cut, and an education bill went through without enough money to pay for it. But that has been about it. With his 2004 re-election race looming, Mr. Bush is certain to reach out again to moderates.
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