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November 8, 2004
On November 5, 2004, NANCY FORD, beloved wife of the late Bob Ford, loving and cherished mother of Bill Ford and his wife Terry and Brian Ford and his wife Sharon, loving "Mom-Mom" of Robin, Kristy, Robert and Billy, great "Mom-Mom" of Jasmine and Andrew, dear sister of Annabelle and Bobby. Also survived by many loving family members and friends. Relatives and friends may call at the family owned AMBROSE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1328 Sulphur Spring Rd., Arbutus, on Monday from 7 to 9 P.M., where a funeral service will be held on Tuesday at 12 P.M. Interment to immediately follow services in the Cedar Hill Cemetery.
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BUSINESS
By John O'Dell and John O'Dell,Los Angeles Times | September 15, 2006
Moving to speed and possibly expand its plan to slash 30,000 jobs from its manufacturing payroll, Ford Motor Co. will offer retirement incentives and buyout packages of as much as $140,000 to all employees at its U.S. factories. More than 75,000 blue-collar workers are eligible for the programs, disclosed yesterday by the United Auto Workers union and acknowledged by Ford. In all, Ford has about 110,000 employees in the United States. The offer is similar to a retirement and buyout plan offered this year by General Motors Corp.
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BUSINESS
By THE DETROIT NEWS | December 7, 2005
DEARBORN, Mich. -- Ford Motor Co. executives were set to present a restructuring plan to the company's board of directors today that calls for closing at least 10 assembly and component plants and eliminating 25,000 to 30,000 blue-collar jobs in North America within five years, according to people familiar with it. The cuts would be deeper than many expected, signaling the urgency of Chairman and CEO William Clay Ford Jr.'s push to restore the automaker's ailing...
NEWS
September 6, 2006
NATIONAL Bush defends policies Invoking the words of terrorists as a reminder of lingering threats, President Bush launched a pre-Sept. 11 push yesterday to defend his national security policies, which are under increasing attack from Democrats in the 2006 election campaign. pg 1a WORLD Calderon is declared victor Mexico's top electoral court declared conservative candidate Felipe Calderon president-elect yesterday, but the decision is unlikely to resolve a political crisis sparked by the muddled outcome of the July 2 contest.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 13, 2005
WILMINGTON, Del. - William Clay Ford Jr., Ford Motor Co.'s chairman and chief executive, told shareholders yesterday that he would take almost no compensation for his services to the company until its automotive business is profitable. Ford Motor has long made the majority of its profits from its Ford Credit lending unit, not from making and selling cars and trucks. Bill Ford warned last month that the automotive unit would break even at best this year, due to higher prices for raw materials and plunging demand for profitable SUVs.
NEWS
September 6, 2006
NATIONAL Bush defends policies Invoking the words of terrorists as a reminder of lingering threats, President Bush launched a pre-Sept. 11 push yesterday to defend his national security policies, which are under increasing attack from Democrats in the 2006 election campaign. pg 1a WORLD Calderon is declared victor Mexico's top electoral court declared conservative candidate Felipe Calderon president-elect yesterday, but the decision is unlikely to resolve a political crisis sparked by the muddled outcome of the July 2 contest.
BUSINESS
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | October 21, 2005
DETROIT -- Ford Motor Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Bill Ford said that the automaker will not announce its coming restructuring until January, despite posting a bigger-than-expected loss yesterday that suggests its troubles could be deeper than previously suspected. Workers at all levels of the company, Ford said, would be affected by the cost-cutting plan, which will include health care benefit changes and plant closings. "This is not a sacrifice that we will ask only the UAW and its membership to bear," he said.
NEWS
September 30, 2005
William Ford, a retired industrial inspector and avid duckpin bowler, died of prostate cancer Sept. 23 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Perry Hall resident was 84. Mr. Ford was born in Virginia and came to Baltimore with his family as an infant. He was a 1939 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, and during World War II served with an Army infantry unit in the Pacific theater. From 1946 to 1953, he was an inspector at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River. He was a Koppers Co. inspector for 17 years, and then worked for Environmental Elements from 1970 until retiring in 1985.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
It's almost as much a tradition in the fall in Detroit as the introduction of the new model year for cars: Wayne Fontes is once again on the hot seat.In his first seven seasons as Detroit Lions coach, Fontes was the definition of mediocrity. He was 52-53.Each time he has seemed on the verge of losing his job, he has managed to rally the team. He took Detroit to the playoffs three times, though the Lions posted only one playoff victory in those years.Last year, he got a two-year contract extension when the Lions rebounded from a 2-4 start to make the playoffs.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
The NFL team with the worst record in the 1997 will get a big consolation prize -- quarterback Peyton Manning.A team can justify paying him a big contract to get him in camp on time because he's supposed to be a franchise quarterback.But the teams that wind up with the second through the six picks in the college draft likely will wind up with only a big headache.There are no other quarterbacks rated in the top six next year, so it figures that the next five players selected after Manning will wind up missing most of training camp in holdouts.
BUSINESS
By THE DETROIT NEWS | December 7, 2005
DEARBORN, Mich. -- Ford Motor Co. executives were set to present a restructuring plan to the company's board of directors today that calls for closing at least 10 assembly and component plants and eliminating 25,000 to 30,000 blue-collar jobs in North America within five years, according to people familiar with it. The cuts would be deeper than many expected, signaling the urgency of Chairman and CEO William Clay Ford Jr.'s push to restore the automaker's ailing...
BUSINESS
By DETROIT FREE PRESS | October 21, 2005
DETROIT -- Ford Motor Co. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Bill Ford said that the automaker will not announce its coming restructuring until January, despite posting a bigger-than-expected loss yesterday that suggests its troubles could be deeper than previously suspected. Workers at all levels of the company, Ford said, would be affected by the cost-cutting plan, which will include health care benefit changes and plant closings. "This is not a sacrifice that we will ask only the UAW and its membership to bear," he said.
NEWS
September 30, 2005
William Ford, a retired industrial inspector and avid duckpin bowler, died of prostate cancer Sept. 23 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Perry Hall resident was 84. Mr. Ford was born in Virginia and came to Baltimore with his family as an infant. He was a 1939 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, and during World War II served with an Army infantry unit in the Pacific theater. From 1946 to 1953, he was an inspector at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River. He was a Koppers Co. inspector for 17 years, and then worked for Environmental Elements from 1970 until retiring in 1985.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 13, 2005
WILMINGTON, Del. - William Clay Ford Jr., Ford Motor Co.'s chairman and chief executive, told shareholders yesterday that he would take almost no compensation for his services to the company until its automotive business is profitable. Ford Motor has long made the majority of its profits from its Ford Credit lending unit, not from making and selling cars and trucks. Bill Ford warned last month that the automotive unit would break even at best this year, due to higher prices for raw materials and plunging demand for profitable SUVs.
NEWS
November 8, 2004
On November 5, 2004, NANCY FORD, beloved wife of the late Bob Ford, loving and cherished mother of Bill Ford and his wife Terry and Brian Ford and his wife Sharon, loving "Mom-Mom" of Robin, Kristy, Robert and Billy, great "Mom-Mom" of Jasmine and Andrew, dear sister of Annabelle and Bobby. Also survived by many loving family members and friends. Relatives and friends may call at the family owned AMBROSE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1328 Sulphur Spring Rd., Arbutus, on Monday from 7 to 9 P.M., where a funeral service will be held on Tuesday at 12 P.M. Interment to immediately follow services in the Cedar Hill Cemetery.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1997
The NFL team with the worst record in the 1997 will get a big consolation prize -- quarterback Peyton Manning.A team can justify paying him a big contract to get him in camp on time because he's supposed to be a franchise quarterback.But the teams that wind up with the second through the six picks in the college draft likely will wind up with only a big headache.There are no other quarterbacks rated in the top six next year, so it figures that the next five players selected after Manning will wind up missing most of training camp in holdouts.
BUSINESS
By John O'Dell and John O'Dell,Los Angeles Times | September 15, 2006
Moving to speed and possibly expand its plan to slash 30,000 jobs from its manufacturing payroll, Ford Motor Co. will offer retirement incentives and buyout packages of as much as $140,000 to all employees at its U.S. factories. More than 75,000 blue-collar workers are eligible for the programs, disclosed yesterday by the United Auto Workers union and acknowledged by Ford. In all, Ford has about 110,000 employees in the United States. The offer is similar to a retirement and buyout plan offered this year by General Motors Corp.
NEWS
By Joe Simnacher and Joe Simnacher,Dallas Morning News | January 10, 1991
Ford Motor Co. executives have been touting their new Mercury Capri convertible as a fun car.At first, the description sounded like a copout: a corporate excuse for a car that no doubt would fall short of Mazda's red-hot Miata -- a real sports car.Expectations sank on word that the Capri wasn't a serious sports car, but a front-wheel-drive "fun car." But, surprise -- the Ford execs were right -- this is a fun car.The 1991 Capri began as a concept car that Ford of Europe first exhibited at the 1983 Frankfurt Motor Show.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
It's almost as much a tradition in the fall in Detroit as the introduction of the new model year for cars: Wayne Fontes is once again on the hot seat.In his first seven seasons as Detroit Lions coach, Fontes was the definition of mediocrity. He was 52-53.Each time he has seemed on the verge of losing his job, he has managed to rally the team. He took Detroit to the playoffs three times, though the Lions posted only one playoff victory in those years.Last year, he got a two-year contract extension when the Lions rebounded from a 2-4 start to make the playoffs.
NEWS
By Joe Simnacher and Joe Simnacher,Dallas Morning News | January 10, 1991
Ford Motor Co. executives have been touting their new Mercury Capri convertible as a fun car.At first, the description sounded like a copout: a corporate excuse for a car that no doubt would fall short of Mazda's red-hot Miata -- a real sports car.Expectations sank on word that the Capri wasn't a serious sports car, but a front-wheel-drive "fun car." But, surprise -- the Ford execs were right -- this is a fun car.The 1991 Capri began as a concept car that Ford of Europe first exhibited at the 1983 Frankfurt Motor Show.
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