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Bill Evans

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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2013
William D. "Bill" Evans, a retired National Security Agency linguist who also maintained an interest in archaeology, died Wednesday of cancer at his Arnold home. He was 85. William David Evans was born in Midway, Ky., and later moved with his family to Bethesda. During World War II, he served with an infantry unit, and after the end of the war, entered the University of Maryland on the G.I. Bill, where he earned his law degree. Mr. Evans went to work for the NSA in 1954 and later learned Russian and Bulgarian, family members said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2013
William D. "Bill" Evans, a retired National Security Agency linguist who also maintained an interest in archaeology, died Wednesday of cancer at his Arnold home. He was 85. William David Evans was born in Midway, Ky., and later moved with his family to Bethesda. During World War II, he served with an infantry unit, and after the end of the war, entered the University of Maryland on the G.I. Bill, where he earned his law degree. Mr. Evans went to work for the NSA in 1954 and later learned Russian and Bulgarian, family members said.
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NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
Last month, Tony Bennett became the oldest recording artist to hit No. 1 on the Billboard Album charts, thanks to "Duets II," featuring his collaborations with the likes of Lady Gaga, Andrea Bocelli, Norah Jones, Michael Buble and the late Amy Winehouse. The chart-topping is just one more remarkable credit for the 85-year-old Bennett, whose six-decade career has been marked by a consistently high artistic standard. The singer also made news last month after saying some controversial things about 9/11, but those remarks were quickly recanted, and Bennett bounced right back into a concert tour that brings him to the Patricia & Arthur Modell Performing Arts Center at the Lyric on Saturday night.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | August 20, 1992
After a life spent in the advertising business, Bill Evans has only one ad hanging on the wall of his home office on the Eastern Shore.It's a large cartoon with the headline "Suddenly It's All Fun and Games Under the JFX." Anybody who lived in Baltimore in 1987 will remember it.People all over the city roared as they scrutinized Don Schnably's intricate, detailed cartoon in The Sun and found the tiny drawing of a couple engaged in some particularly explicit "fun and games" on a carousel at the City Fair.
NEWS
By Gil Sandler | August 18, 1998
THIS COLUMN has, through the years, accepted the challenges of settling disputes among the natives concerning the origins of local legends and lore.Some examples: Was there really an elephant at the zoo that played "St. Louis Blues" on the harmonica? (Yes, Minnie in 1946, and you could look it up.) Did a prisoner dig a tunnel out of his city jail cell down and under and up onto Preston Street and walk free? (Yes, "Tunnel Joe" Holmes, in 1951.) How did Charm City get its name? That is the story we take up today.
SPORTS
May 18, 1993
Bill EvansLoyola, LacrosseEvans had four goals and two assists in the Dons' 13-12 win over then-No. 1 St. Paul's and had three goals and two assists against Mount St. Joseph in a 16-4 win.
NEWS
June 21, 2005
JEANETTE FRANCES EVANS, 59, on Sunday, June 19, 2005 at her home. Beloved wife of Bill Evans of Chester, MD; mother of Glenn Evans (Cye), Stevensville, MD, Tracy Connell (Michael), Lutherville, MD and Melanie Wilson (Michael), Key West, FL; sister of Joyce Sackett, Timonium, MD and Jan Kelly, Greensboro, NC; grandmother of six. A Memorial Service (casual dress) to celebrate her life will be held for friends and family at American Legion Post 296, 6200 Main Street, Queenstown, MD on Monday, June 27, 5 P.M. to 9 P.M. For directions call Post 296 between 2 and 8 P.M. (except Mondays)
NEWS
February 14, 2004
On February 12, 2004 JACKSONHAYWORTH GIFFIN, JR.; loving brother of Jo Ann Cook, Nancy Evans, Richard Giffin and Diann Withers; devoted uncle of Dina Berman, Bill Evans, Jr. and Ashley Cook. Also survived by many loving relatives. Family will receive friends on Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 at HARRY H. WITZKE FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City, where a service will be held on Monday 11:30 A.M. Interment will follow at Crestlawn Memorial Gardens.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | June 9, 1993
All-Metro performers Michael Watson (St. Paul's) and Bill Evans (Loyola) head a list of Maryland Scholastic Association A Conference players who were recently named All-Americans by the United States Interscholastic Lacrosse Coaches' Association.Watson, a two-time All-Metro and this year's C. Markland Kelly Award winner, is The Baltimore Sun's 1993 Player of the Year for boys lacrosse. He and Evans were named All-Americans for the second straight year.All-Metro players Andy Sharretts (Boys' Latin)
NEWS
June 21, 2005
JEANETTE FRANCES EVANS, 59, on Sunday, June 19, 2005 at her home. Beloved wife of Bill Evans of Chester, MD; mother of Glenn Evans (Cye), Stevensville, MD, Tracy Connell (Michael), Lutherville, MD and Melanie Wilson (Michael), Key West, FL; sister of Joyce Sackett, Timonium, MD and Jan Kelly, Greensboro, NC; grandmother of six. A Memorial Service (casual dress) to celebrate her life will be held for friends and family at American Legion Post 296, 6200 Main Street, Queenstown, MD on Monday, June 27, 5 P.M. to 9 P.M. For directions call Post 296 between 2 and 8 P.M. (except Mondays)
NEWS
February 14, 2004
On February 12, 2004 JACKSONHAYWORTH GIFFIN, JR.; loving brother of Jo Ann Cook, Nancy Evans, Richard Giffin and Diann Withers; devoted uncle of Dina Berman, Bill Evans, Jr. and Ashley Cook. Also survived by many loving relatives. Family will receive friends on Sunday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 at HARRY H. WITZKE FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City, where a service will be held on Monday 11:30 A.M. Interment will follow at Crestlawn Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2003
The record industry opened a broad new front yesterday in its legal war on Internet music swapping, a practice it believes has caused compact disc sales to plummet by billions of dollars in recent years. The Recording Industry Association of America filed copyright infringement lawsuits against 261 individuals it claims have uploaded more than 1,000 music files on networks such as Kazaa, Grokster, Imesh, Gnutella and Blubster. The industry said the lawsuits, filed in federal courts across the country, were among the first of what could be thousands of legal actions against individuals alleged to be holding illegal music files.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Thomas W. Waldron and Greg Garland and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
While few if any legislators, lobbyists or activists knew that Del. Tony E. Fulton planned last fall to introduce sweeping legislation targeting lead paint manufacturers, one person who had advance knowledge was lobbyist Gerard E. Evans.And Evans, the highest-paid lobbyist in Annapolis, made sure that his paint company clients knew, too.Evans obtained a copy of an October letter from Fulton to Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke outlining his proposed bill and forwarded it to at least two of his clients -- paint manufacturers that would have been hurt by the legislation, sources with the companies told The Sun.Those two companies and two other paint manufacturers paid Evans a combined $135,000 since November 1996 to ward off such legislation, state records show.
NEWS
By Gil Sandler | August 18, 1998
THIS COLUMN has, through the years, accepted the challenges of settling disputes among the natives concerning the origins of local legends and lore.Some examples: Was there really an elephant at the zoo that played "St. Louis Blues" on the harmonica? (Yes, Minnie in 1946, and you could look it up.) Did a prisoner dig a tunnel out of his city jail cell down and under and up onto Preston Street and walk free? (Yes, "Tunnel Joe" Holmes, in 1951.) How did Charm City get its name? That is the story we take up today.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 7, 1995
How did Bruce Hornsby and Branford Marsalis wind up playing the national anthem before Cal Ripken's record-breaking game last night?Simple. They're Angels fans.Hornsby's relationship with the team goes back to a Grateful Dead show in 1991. "You know -- Wally Joyner and Dave Winfield on the stage, stuff like that," he says. So the pianist got into the habit of seeing the team at Camden Yards, the closest major-league stadium to his Williamsburg, Va., home."Every time the Angels come [to Camden Yards]
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 7, 1995
How did Bruce Hornsby and Branford Marsalis wind up playing the national anthem before Cal Ripken's record-breaking game last night?Simple. They're Angels fans.Hornsby's relationship with the team goes back to a Grateful Dead show in 1991. "You know -- Wally Joyner and Dave Winfield on the stage, stuff like that," he says. So the pianist got into the habit of seeing the team at Camden Yards, the closest major-league stadium to his Williamsburg, Va., home."Every time the Angels come [to Camden Yards]
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | November 15, 1992
Running back Ricky Dangerfield is the smallest player on City's football roster, which includes linemen who weigh nearly 270 pounds.But in yesterday's 14-11 victory at third-ranked Loyola (8-2, 6-2) before a boisterous crowd of 3,500, the 5-foot-7, 150-pound junior was among the top-ranked Knights' biggest assets.There were teammates who had more yardage: Receiver Dwight Banks (five catches, 55 yards), All-Metro quarterback Terrence Suber (49 yards, nine carries) and 230-pound fullback Antonio Travers (40 yards, five)
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | June 9, 1993
All-Metro performers Michael Watson (St. Paul's) and Bill Evans (Loyola) head a list of Maryland Scholastic Association A Conference players who were recently named All-Americans by the United States Interscholastic Lacrosse Coaches' Association.Watson, a two-time All-Metro and this year's C. Markland Kelly Award winner, is The Baltimore Sun's 1993 Player of the Year for boys lacrosse. He and Evans were named All-Americans for the second straight year.All-Metro players Andy Sharretts (Boys' Latin)
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