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NEWS
February 1, 1993
The news that Bill Brock is thinking of running for governor next year is both intriguing and disquieting. It is intriguing that a highly respected national Republican -- former U.S. senator, party national chairman, Reagan administration labor secretary and trade negotiator -- would be interested in the race. It is disquieting because, once again, it points to the shortage of qualified, home-grown Republican candidates for state office.Although he has lived in Annapolis for seven years, and in Montgomery County for some time before that, Mr. Brock's political career was born and nurtured in Tennessee, the state he represented in both halls of Congress for 14 years.
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NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN REPORTER | October 10, 2007
As quips ricocheted around him, former Tennessee Sen. Fred Thompson largely stayed away from the one-liners during his first presidential debate yesterday, sticking to the low-key style that has drawn derision during his month on the campaign trail. In a highly anticipated appearance, Thompson shared a Dearborn, Mich., stage with eight other candidates seeking the Republican presidential nomination, giving a national audience its first opportunity to directly compare the 65-year-old actor with other contenders for the White House.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 15, 1994
"I love Parris in the springtime, I love Parris in the fall." -- New state anthem.Cheer up. Marion Barry is redeemed.Bill Brock and Paul Sarbanes can really discuss the issues. Voters don't want that, it's boring. They want sleaze, slime and slurp. Sorry, wrong guys.So long, Helen. It's been real.
NEWS
February 19, 1996
WHEN RUTHANN ARON entered the 1994 Republican primary for the U.S. Senate, her record of public service consisted of two years on the Montgomery County Planning Board. Her motivation stemmed largely from a grudge against the incumbent, Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, who had refused to meet with her and several other developers on a business matter.With these scant qualifications -- and facing an experienced opponent, former Tennessee Sen. Bill Brock -- she took the low road, relying on negative ads that hammered Mr. Brock as a tax-raising, carpet-bagging career politician.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 30, 1994
His CIA controllers have ruled that Aldrich Ames will get no more victims, especially not them.If disaster could happen on as calm a body of water as the Baltic, treat the Chesapeake with respect.Virginians could not stop Grant but, by God, they were not going to be rolled over by Mickey Mouse.Polls show that Bill Brock is as popular in Maryland as in Tennessee.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1994
Republican U.S. Senate candidate Bill Brock appears to have widened his lead over his two closest competitors for the party's nomination in Tuesday's primary, according to an independent poll taken this week.Mr. Brock, a former U.S. senator from Tennessee, leads the field with 29 percent of the vote in the statewide poll. Montgomery County developer Ruthann Aron has 21 percent, and state Del. C. Ronald Franks has 17 percent. Twenty-five percent of likely GOP primary voters remain undecided.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Trying to capitalize on one of the hot issues of the fall campaign, Republican U.S. Senate challenger Bill Brock has gone on television with a commercial implying that incumbent Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes is soft on crime.The advertisement states that Mr. Sarbanes voted to strike death penalty provisions from the recent crime bill and opposed mandatory sentences for crimes involving a gun and for selling drugs to children."Now he tells us he's tough on crime," the narrator says. "The more you hear about Senator Sarbanes, the more he sounds like part of the problem."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1994
After months of attacks from a primary opponent, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Bill Brock fought back for the first time yesterday with the help of two senior Maryland GOP leaders.In dueling news conferences outside the old Montgomery County courthouse, Mr. Brock defended his record and then was attacked anew by opponent Ruthann Aron.Moments after Mr. Brock finished, Ms. Aron, a Montgomery County developer, stood at a microphone to continue her denunciations and defend her attacks on him.Mr.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1994
U.S. Senate candidate Ruthann Aron denounced as "extortionist" and "racist" yesterday a letter that the head of the Anne Arundel Taxpayers Association sent in support of her opponent, Bill Brock.Robert C. Schaeffer, who two years ago led the successful fight to impose a property tax cap on county government, sent the letter urging all Republican candidates in Anne Arundel County to actively support Mr. Brock.Mr. Schaeffer suggested they put Brock stickers on their yard signs or a Brock sign alongside their own."
NEWS
September 2, 1994
Dr. Ross Z. Pierpont, the hardy perennial of Maryland Republicanism, had a splendid time the other night as he jousted for the honor of trying to oust Democrat Paul S. Sarbanes from his well-worn seat in the U.S. Senate.A fellow who has known defeat many times, Dr. Pierpont's ambitions are tempered with irony, humor and curmudgeonry.Given a spot in the Republican Party's one and only official debate of the primary season, he took on his three ahead-in-the-polls rivals with a gusto they reserved for pot-shotting one another.
NEWS
November 5, 1994
Let's Have DebateThe Sun is right on target in its Oct. 22 editorial when it excoriates the special-interest-fueled political system that, this year, has led to a greater proliferation of attack ads than ever before.It is a fact, however, that Maryland had a chance this year to see a different kind of campaign, one characterized by serious discussion of the issues.Months before the primary, Republican Senate candidate Bill Brock offered to incumbent Paul Sarbanes that the two split the costs of funding six network-televised, Lincoln-Douglas style debates that would better inform the people of Maryland about the positions of the two on the real problems facing all of us.Unfortunately, Mr. Sarbanes, who dismissed the present system "corruptive" as early as 1983, waited until after the primary to ,, reply to Mr. Brock, and then had his campaign manager blow off Mr. Brock's proposed ennobling of the system as a "stunt."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | November 5, 1994
Republican Bill Brock has spent nearly $1.8 million of his own money in his race for the U.S. Senate, but poll results released yesterday show that he still trails his opponent, incumbent Democrat Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, by a wide margin.The poll, conducted by Mason- Dixon Political Media Research for The Sun and other news organizations, shows Mr. Sarbanes leading Mr. Brock, 56 percent to 36 percent, with 8 percent undecided.Mason-Dixon surveyed 832 regular voters for the poll on Wednesday and Thursday.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 30, 1994
I'll tell you about this Paul Sarbanes, who's in politics though not so you'd always notice. He went on public television the other night, where Bill Brock called him a stealth senator, meaning Sarbanes is so low-profile as to be invisible. And I had to admit Brock had a point, and I also wanted to punch him right in the nose for saying it.Sarbanes is now finishing a quarter-century on Capitol Hill. And I talk to him once in a while and write about him here and there, and most of the time I like what he says and once in a while, to be as honest as I can, I don't entirely understand everything he's talking about.
NEWS
October 30, 1994
Reagan YearsThere he goes again -- Barry Rascovar and the "the failure of Ronald Reagan's economic theories in Washington" (column, Oct. 23).Do you call the greatest economic period in our history a failure? When the gross national product grew from $1.5 trillion to over $4 trillion?When government had available $0.5 trillion to, at the end, $1.5 trillion? When interest rates fell from 16 percent to 3 percent? When the richest 5 percent paid from 15 percent and at the end 22 percent?When 20 million jobs were created, of which one-third paid over $50,000, while Mr. Clinton has created 3 million jobs, of which 24 percent are under $7,000 a year?
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 20, 1994
SO THE mudslinging has begun! Paul Sarbanes is running a television commercial saying Bill Brock is a Tennessean!Sarbanes seems to think that reminding Maryland voters that his opponent used to be Rep. (later Sen.) Brock, R-Tenn., is damaging -- that "Tenn" is a four-letter word in Maryland. And he's probably right. Take me. Some of my best friends are Tennesseans, but I wouldn't want my daughters to vote for one.Brock told editorial writers last week that he wishes the campaign could be fought out on today's issues and tomorrow's votes in Congress rather than yesterday's.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | October 17, 1994
SEN. PAUL Sarbanes dropped by the Ivory Tower to talk about his re-election campaign.He asked editorial writers to consider the fact that when his Republican opponent, Bill Brock, was a senator from Tennessee in the 1970s, he missed 20 percent of the roll call votes. He, himself, however, almost always votes. He voted on 770 of 772 roll calls in the two years of this Congress. You could look it up.(I did. Sarbanes hasn't missed more than 9 percent of roll calls a year in his whole Senate career, and hasn't missed more than 1 percent in the last eight years.
NEWS
December 10, 1993
FIVE years ago, a woman tried to revive her husband with a toilet plunger -- and succeeded.The man had been suffering from a heart attack and the frantic wife, not knowing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, grabbed for the first thing she saw. It paid off. Researchers from the American Heart Association now report that a suction devise inspired by the plunger seems twice as effective as standard CPR.Dr. Kelly Tucker of the cardiology department with the University of Florida says that of 53 hospitalized patients suffering from cardiac arrest, 24 percent of the patients who received suction-enhanced CPR survived while only 11 percent survived with standard CPR practices.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris Brock family business gets bid from Brach | September 2, 1994
The Democratic incumbents for Maryland attorney general and comptroller continue to hold significant leads against their opponents in the primary and general elections, a new statewide poll shows.If the Democratic primary were held now, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. would receive 34 percent of the vote, Eleanor M. Carey 17 percent and Patrick J. Smith 7 percent. The poll found 42 percent of the Democratic voters were undecided. The margin of error was plus or minus 5 percent.The telephone poll was conducted Aug. 26 through Aug. 28 by Mason-Dixon Political Media Research in Columbia for The Sun and other news organizations.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | October 13, 1994
Trying to capitalize on one of the hot issues of the fall campaign, Republican U.S. Senate challenger Bill Brock has gone on television with a commercial implying that incumbent Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes is soft on crime.The advertisement states that Mr. Sarbanes voted to strike death penalty provisions from the recent crime bill and opposed mandatory sentences for crimes involving a gun and for selling drugs to children."Now he tells us he's tough on crime," the narrator says. "The more you hear about Senator Sarbanes, the more he sounds like part of the problem."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 2, 1994
Out there in the political chill stands Bill Brock, plaintively asking why Paul Sarbanes won't come outside and talk to him in public. Brock should know better. Sarbanes is one of the quiet men of the U.S. Senate. But if he starts to talk, he might mention a whole history that Bill Brock would rather nobody notice.Brock's been dancing around that history. He's 63 years old, and he's been in the political business for three decades, but not so that many around here would notice. He runs television commercials every day now boasting of his political profile.
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