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June 6, 1999
Bill Blass, one of the first American designers to start his own label, recently launched his latest perfume, Amazing. Blass, 77, suffered a mild heart attack recently and announced that after 50 years in fashion, he will retire next year. Here he talks about his work and life.Q. Why retire?A. I really feel that after 50-odd years -- and believe me, odd -- 50 years of working that I want to do a book, and I want to do other things. I really want to spend some time in the country. And, God, I'm entitled.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Eileen Abato, a retired department store fashion director who became an advocate for AIDS awareness, died of leukemia Thursday at the Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 69. Born Eileen Mary Wible in a Philadelphia suburb, she grew up in Hermosa Beach, Calif., and was a graduate of Mira Costa High School there. In a 1989 Baltimore Sun profile, she recounted that she wanted to go into fashion sales as a teen and joined a work-study program at the May Co. She initially sold hosiery and housewares, but as an 18-year-old, she talked her way into becoming a May Co. fashion coordinator in a newly opened West Los Angeles store.
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FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2002
Bill Blass, the American designer who built a multimillion-dollar business on understated clothes and a keen perception of the taste of upper-income American woman, died last night at his home in New Preston, Conn. He was 79. The cause was cancer, said his friend Helen O'Hagan. Mr. Blass was the first to say he was the kind of designer who was rediscovered every few years, but although his star burned more brightly in some seasons than in others, he remained in the forefront of fashion for more than three decades.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 2002
Bill Blass, the American designer who built a multimillion-dollar business on understated clothes and a keen perception of the taste of upper-income American woman, died last night at his home in New Preston, Conn. He was 79. The cause was cancer, said his friend Helen O'Hagan. Mr. Blass was the first to say he was the kind of designer who was rediscovered every few years, but although his star burned more brightly in some seasons than in others, he remained in the forefront of fashion for more than three decades.
FEATURES
By Etta Froio and Etta Froio,Fairchild Publications | January 27, 1994
Bill Blass and Oscar de la Renta, the ambassadors of American fashion, are always ready to charm.Since Mr. de la Renta, now 61, showed his first collection in 1965 for Jane Derby, and Mr. Blass brought his boyhood visions of 1930s glamour from Fort Wayne, Ind., to New York 50 years ago, they both have slowly and methodically built their careers by dressing the affluent.The formula has paid off handsomely for the two designers.Mr. Blass, 71, has 50 worldwide licensees which reportedly generate retail sales in excess of $700,000,000.
FEATURES
By T. J. Howard and T. J. Howard,Chicago Tribune | January 9, 1992
The resolutions that top-name designers have made offer clues to what lies ahead for them this year -- and for those of us who are fans of their clothes:Christian Francis Roth: "I want to surprise people with my next few collections. I've been using a lot of color the past three years, but now I'm crazy about black. Black with gold. Black with silver. Black with pink. It's like shadow -- it adds shape and dimension."Adrienne Vittadini: "I want to be more active in social and environmental issues" like the homeless, rain forest and AIDS, says Ms. Vittadini.
FEATURES
By Woody Hochswender and Woody Hochswender,N.Y. Times News Service | January 9, 1991
NEW YORK -- Women in the 1990s may be searching for quiet chic, but the desire for shimmer and sparkle cannot be entirely suppressed.Those who would not wear expensive jewelry around the neck or wrist think nothing of wearing today's glittering, gem-studded clothes. But these are not the galactic dresses of old Hollywood.Contemporary designers go beyond sequins and rhinestones to marry the techniques of jewelry-making to simple dress shapes.The jewel-like effects include shoulder straps of suede threaded through big chunks of Austrian crystal, faux-pearl straps or pearl-studded knits, and big 60s-style Lucite bangles, which crisscross the back, line the bare midriff or dangle around the waist as a belt.
FEATURES
By N.Y. TImes News Service | November 28, 1990
Designers read their reviews, all right. While not as financially dependent on good notices as, say, a playwright, clothing designers can be just as sensitive. This week a number of designers got over their recent reviews enough to talk about them.Christian Francis Roth, a 21-year-old designer who held his second show this season: "People really wanted blood from me this season. It was really in the air. They've done it to every young designer I can think of. The out-of-town press misunderstood the clothes."
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | November 3, 1992
There's a spirit of good citizenship in the fashion world. American designers, who are showing their spring/summer collections this week, have their own particular ways of reminding fans and colleagues to get out and vote.Joan Vass included a straightforward VOTE card with the invitation to her show. Fernando Sanchez, on the other hand, who chose dreamy sherbet colors for his spring loungewear theme, chose to end his show on a note of Americana. He sent out the not-to-be-missed Naomi Campbell in bright red, white and blue feathers formed into a skimpy bra and bikini tutu.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | November 4, 1995
White-bread and mayonnaise styles of the Sixties have been spiced up and recycled for next spring. Muffy as muse? Both young designers and old houses tapped suburbia and the country club for ideas.Women who remember Liberty prints, madras plaids, Aigner straw satchels and Pappagallo flats as summer staples will feel a jolt because these are not your basic mummy designs.Hold on to your Bermuda bags! Anna Sui took the Villager look downtown to the Village blowing up the floral prints to upholstery-sized scale.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
NEW YORK - After almost a week of going to designers' shows, here's the skinny on spring fashion - and we don't mean the models. Best Spectacle - Betsey Johnson This was the most talked about show of Fashion Week - and believe me, it wasn't because of the clothes. Johnson wisely created this buzz by sending 29 former Playboy Playmates down her runway wearing skimpy outfits that few naturally endowed women could fill quite as well. To the beat of songs like "I Want Your Sex," the Playmates flounced about wearing pink fur bikinis, tight tube dresses, super-short shorts and skirts with fluffy, "Please-grab-my-behind" bunny tails.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
Bill Blass, one of the first American designers to start his own label, recently launched his latest perfume, Amazing. Blass, 77, suffered a mild heart attack recently and announced that after 50 years in fashion, he will retire next year. Here he talks about his work and life.Q. Why retire?A. I really feel that after 50-odd years -- and believe me, odd -- 50 years of working that I want to do a book, and I want to do other things. I really want to spend some time in the country. And, God, I'm entitled.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
What, exactly, is a lifestyle, and where can you get one?Fifteen years ago, the answer to that question might have been quite different. But that year, 1983, is the year that Ralph Lauren, designer of elegant clothing for men and women, turned his discerning eye to the field of home furnishings.Bath and bed linens, furniture, tableware, beds and chests, sofas and chairs, lamps and accessories soon joined the suits, evening gowns and long tailored coats Lauren was known for.Suddenly it was possible not only to dress yourself in a designer's particular look, it was also possible to dress your house - at retail - in a designer's vision.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1998
Mary Ann Lundgren knows clothes. A former fashion director for Neiman Marcus, she's worked with Bill Blass, Emanuel Ungaro and other top name designers. While she likes high-end clothing, she believes women need to have confidence in their own style. "The biggest mistake is to let fashion dominate," she says.Since 1996, Lundgren, executive director of Women of Achievement in Maryland History Inc., has been on a quest to find exemplary women throughout state history for a book about their achievements.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | November 4, 1995
White-bread and mayonnaise styles of the Sixties have been spiced up and recycled for next spring. Muffy as muse? Both young designers and old houses tapped suburbia and the country club for ideas.Women who remember Liberty prints, madras plaids, Aigner straw satchels and Pappagallo flats as summer staples will feel a jolt because these are not your basic mummy designs.Hold on to your Bermuda bags! Anna Sui took the Villager look downtown to the Village blowing up the floral prints to upholstery-sized scale.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts | April 13, 1995
BYRON LARSThe fashion crowd was all smiles to have Byron Lars back after missing a season.The only African-American designer with his own label is known for showmanship and craftsmanship.It was the cartoon soap story of Trayla Parker, who leaves her mobile home in search of city chic. Trayla is transformed into a socialite by deft tailoring and sensational accessories.Fitted '40s suits as done by Lars have more nip and curve than their conservative cousins and it's all done with pleating and seaming.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1998
Mary Ann Lundgren knows clothes. A former fashion director for Neiman Marcus, she's worked with Bill Blass, Emanuel Ungaro and other top name designers. While she likes high-end clothing, she believes women need to have confidence in their own style. "The biggest mistake is to let fashion dominate," she says.Since 1996, Lundgren, executive director of Women of Achievement in Maryland History Inc., has been on a quest to find exemplary women throughout state history for a book about their achievements.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
What, exactly, is a lifestyle, and where can you get one?Fifteen years ago, the answer to that question might have been quite different. But that year, 1983, is the year that Ralph Lauren, designer of elegant clothing for men and women, turned his discerning eye to the field of home furnishings.Bath and bed linens, furniture, tableware, beds and chests, sofas and chairs, lamps and accessories soon joined the suits, evening gowns and long tailored coats Lauren was known for.Suddenly it was possible not only to dress yourself in a designer's particular look, it was also possible to dress your house - at retail - in a designer's vision.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | August 4, 1994
If Bright Bluford wants a pair of shoes, little stands in her way of getting them.Take her Calvin Klein leopard pumps. Never mind that one is a 7, the other a 7 1/2 and that the store wanted to return them to the designer. Ms. Bluford decided they would be hers. And when it comes to fashion, this 33-year-old actress from East Baltimore usually gets what she wants.Among friends and family, she is known as a "shopping machine," a woman who can recite from memory the dates of sales at department stores in Baltimore, Washington and New York.
FEATURES
By Etta Froio and Etta Froio,Fairchild Publications | January 27, 1994
Bill Blass and Oscar de la Renta, the ambassadors of American fashion, are always ready to charm.Since Mr. de la Renta, now 61, showed his first collection in 1965 for Jane Derby, and Mr. Blass brought his boyhood visions of 1930s glamour from Fort Wayne, Ind., to New York 50 years ago, they both have slowly and methodically built their careers by dressing the affluent.The formula has paid off handsomely for the two designers.Mr. Blass, 71, has 50 worldwide licensees which reportedly generate retail sales in excess of $700,000,000.
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