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By Wesley Case | July 11, 2011
As far as I can tell (read: I searched on Google for 15 seconds), Bill Bellamy (of "Def Jam's How to Be a Player" fame) has a clean record. So did Lil B dedicate a whole song to the ex-MTV VJ because his last name kinda (OK, not really) rhymes with "felony"? I doubt anyone keeping up with the Based God's on-the-whim memes would be surprised. Still, this song jams thanks largely to its nonsensical hook, a countdown first to seven and then finished at 10 of serious crimes under the rapper's belt (doubting the validity of that as well)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | July 11, 2011
As far as I can tell (read: I searched on Google for 15 seconds), Bill Bellamy (of "Def Jam's How to Be a Player" fame) has a clean record. So did Lil B dedicate a whole song to the ex-MTV VJ because his last name kinda (OK, not really) rhymes with "felony"? I doubt anyone keeping up with the Based God's on-the-whim memes would be surprised. Still, this song jams thanks largely to its nonsensical hook, a countdown first to seven and then finished at 10 of serious crimes under the rapper's belt (doubting the validity of that as well)
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By Dave Michaels and Dave Michaels,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 6, 1997
"Don't player-hate on me" is the mantra for an entire generation of aspiring playboys claiming an unwritten right to sow their royal oats. Revered and detested by peers, the player is sure he's just a decent guy with a commitment problem. Or at least that's what Bill Bellamy thinks in the new urban comedy "How to Be a Player."Although "How to Be a Player" frequently refers to the 1973 blaxploitation classic "The Mack," the new Bellamy film is more along the lines of such recent urban comedies as Ice Cube's "Friday," palpably low-budget, peppered with sardonic one-line witticisms and quite often hilarious.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2001
A bunch of guys hanging out, shooting some hoops and just generally trying to figure out women. That's what "The Brothers" is all about. And while a more determinedly miserable group of guys would be hard to imagine, there are enough moments that ring true sprinkled throughout this movie to command your attention, if not your imagination. There's nothing here we haven't seen on screen a hundred times before. If one of these guys were actually happy, and made something of an effort to stay that way - now that would be a movie to cherish.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 23, 2001
A bunch of guys hanging out, shooting some hoops and just generally trying to figure out women. That's what "The Brothers" is all about. And while a more determinedly miserable group of guys would be hard to imagine, there are enough moments that ring true sprinkled throughout this movie to command your attention, if not your imagination. There's nothing here we haven't seen on screen a hundred times before. If one of these guys were actually happy, and made something of an effort to stay that way - now that would be a movie to cherish.
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By Los Angeles Times | January 11, 1994
Bill Bellamy has a way of looking into the camera and addressing just you. It doesn't matter if he's introducing the latest Salt N' Pepa video or interviewing Janet Jackson. There's something about the way he laughs, moves and makes eye contact that tells you you've been singled out of the audience.Unlike many of his fellow comedians, the MTV veejay veers away from graphic sexual material, opting instead for what he calls "a lot of topical stuff, observational stuff.""I try to make people see the lighter side of things," says Mr. Bellamy,26, who started out as a stand-up comedian.
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By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1994
By the time we got to WoodstockWe were half a grand in the hole,And everywhere was a rule and a regulation.And I dreamed I saw giant Pepsi logosClimbing halfway to the sky.Turning into dollar signsAbove our nation.I didn't get myself back to the garden for a number of reasons, which mainly have to do with the $135 ticket price as well as an inability to stay up much past 11 unless someone keeps slapping me hard across the face.But what I did do yesterday is grab the remote with my fat, Cheetos-stained fingers and click on MTV. There was Woodstock '94, live from Saugerties, N.Y., with perky Tabitha Soren acting as our host, and field reporters Alison Stewart, Bill Bellamy and Riki Rachtman so wired they seemed hooked to an IV drip of Folgers.
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By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | April 7, 2009
Fawcett's cancer spreads to liver Farrah Fawcett is being treated for anal cancer that has spread to her liver and has been hospitalized in Los Angeles for a complication from a routine treatment, a producer who worked with the actress and her doctor said Monday. Confirmation that the cancer had spread to such a distant site was dire news. The actress, 62, was diagnosed with anal cancer in 2006. She was declared in remission on Feb. 2, 2007, but three months later, scans showed "not only had it recurred, it metastasized to her liver," producer Craig Nevius said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan M. Pitts | January 13, 2005
An update on the concert scene: newly announced shows and ticket availability. For ticket information and purchase, call Ticketmaster at 410-547-SEAT except as noted. Just announced Steven Curtis Chapman, with guests Chris Tomlin and Casting Crowns, perform at 1st Mariner Arena on April 3. Tickets go on sale tomorrow at 10 a.m. "A Special Valentine Evening," starring Lalah Hathaway and Norman Brown will be held at the Warner Theatre in Washington on Feb. 14. Tickets go on sale tomorrow at 10 a.m. The "Big Beautiful Tour," starring Jill Scott, with guest Floetry, stops at Constitution Hall in Washington on March 9. Doug Segree plays Rams Head Live in Baltimore on Jan. 28. Call 410-727-5151.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | May 17, 2001
You'll be singing the blues this weekend at the fourth annual Chesapeake Bay Blues Festival at Sandy Point State Park, off U.S. 50 in Annapolis. The two-day lineup of musicians includes such blues stars as the legendary Bo Diddley, Grammy winner Keb Mo, guitarists George Thorogood and the Destroyers, Tinsley Ellis, Sista Monica, Big Time Sarah, Sue Foley and Big Jesse Yawn. Bring low-back lawn or beach chairs and blankets, but leave food and drink at home -- there'll be plenty of both at the festival.
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By Dave Michaels and Dave Michaels,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 6, 1997
"Don't player-hate on me" is the mantra for an entire generation of aspiring playboys claiming an unwritten right to sow their royal oats. Revered and detested by peers, the player is sure he's just a decent guy with a commitment problem. Or at least that's what Bill Bellamy thinks in the new urban comedy "How to Be a Player."Although "How to Be a Player" frequently refers to the 1973 blaxploitation classic "The Mack," the new Bellamy film is more along the lines of such recent urban comedies as Ice Cube's "Friday," palpably low-budget, peppered with sardonic one-line witticisms and quite often hilarious.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1994
By the time we got to WoodstockWe were half a grand in the hole,And everywhere was a rule and a regulation.And I dreamed I saw giant Pepsi logosClimbing halfway to the sky.Turning into dollar signsAbove our nation.I didn't get myself back to the garden for a number of reasons, which mainly have to do with the $135 ticket price as well as an inability to stay up much past 11 unless someone keeps slapping me hard across the face.But what I did do yesterday is grab the remote with my fat, Cheetos-stained fingers and click on MTV. There was Woodstock '94, live from Saugerties, N.Y., with perky Tabitha Soren acting as our host, and field reporters Alison Stewart, Bill Bellamy and Riki Rachtman so wired they seemed hooked to an IV drip of Folgers.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 11, 1994
Bill Bellamy has a way of looking into the camera and addressing just you. It doesn't matter if he's introducing the latest Salt N' Pepa video or interviewing Janet Jackson. There's something about the way he laughs, moves and makes eye contact that tells you you've been singled out of the audience.Unlike many of his fellow comedians, the MTV veejay veers away from graphic sexual material, opting instead for what he calls "a lot of topical stuff, observational stuff.""I try to make people see the lighter side of things," says Mr. Bellamy,26, who started out as a stand-up comedian.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1994
This is Melissa Young's resume:The Western High School graduate entered Morgan State University at age 16. She graduated at age 20 with an electrical engineering degree. By age 22, Ms. Young had her master's degree in electrical engineering from Cornell University. Now all of 23, Ms. Young lives in Los Angeles, where she works as an engineer at Hughes Space and Communications Co.She also won the 1994 Black Engineer of the Year award for "Most Promising Engineer." The award is sponsored by the Council of Engineering Deans of the historically black colleges and universities, US Black Engineer magazine and others.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Matt Vensel | matt@bthesite.com and b free daily | March 30, 2010
The Orioles cobbling together a starting rotation had become a rite of spring in Baltimore, just like the locals busting out their lacrosse sticks and Hampdenites dusting off their jorts and sweat-stained off-white tanktops for a little fun in the sun. This offseason has been different, though. Four of the team's five starters were set in stone long before the Orioles reported to Sarasota, Fla. The only real battle -- and it's a good one -- has been to see which youngster will be the fifth starter.
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