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By Linda Chavez | June 16, 1998
IN THE WEEK since California voters overwhelmingly rejected bilingual education for children in their state, I've had some interesting conversations with political leaders, parents, teachers, researchers and journalists on what the vote will mean for non-English-speaking children around the country.Everyone agrees that Proposition 227, which received 61 percent of the California vote, marks an end to bilingual education as we know it. Nonetheless, a group of die-hard bilingual advocates has filed suit to block enforcement of the measure.
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NEWS
March 19, 2006
Dyslexia program is set for Tuesday The Friendship School, an independent nonprofit school for children of average to above average intelligence with learning differences, will sponsor an informational program at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Literacy Council of Carroll County, Suite 315, Carroll Nonprofit Center at 255 Clifton Blvd., Westminster. The program will focus on children with dyslexia. A workshop for tutors and trainers on strategies and tips for helping clients with dyslexia will be held at 7 p.m. April 4 at the Literacy Council.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 1999
TUCSON, Ariz. -- Three decades ago, this desert city was the birthplace of the national bilingual education movement, a point of pride among many Latinos here. For them, Spanish-language classrooms are as much a part of the local landscape as the saguaro cactus.This year, Ron Unz came to Tucson launching a voter initiative that would do away with bilingual education in Arizona, a plan nearly identical to the one he wrote and California voters approved last year.What really riles the bilingual faithful is that Unz has the support of a small group of disaffected Latino residents: teachers, parents and grandparents, some of them natives of Mexico.
NEWS
September 18, 2002
A nationally known cartoonist and an expert in bilingual education will be the featured speakers during Hispanic Heritage Month at McDaniel College in Westminster. Co-sponsored by the McDaniel College Hispanic/Latino Alliance and the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the campus celebration that started Sunday and runs through Oct. 15 also features exhibits in Decker College Center. Hector Cantu, co-creator and writer of the newspaper comic strip "Baldo," takes the podium at 7 o'clock tonight in Baker Memorial Chapel.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 1998
MIAMI -- While California debates whether to stop teaching schoolchildren in two languages, the school system in this city at the crossroads of the Americas is expanding bilingual education under the argument that students will need to speak, read and write in English and Spanish when they reach the business world.Here in Miami, there was little protest and much praise when the school board endorsed a plan this year to increase bilingual teaching for all students -- not just those with limited English skills -- from kindergarten through 12th grade.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- Get ready for the next reading wars.The federal government is about to launch the most ambitious inquiry to date into how Hispanic children in the United States learn to read in English.The government plans to spend $45 million over five years to explore this complex -- and controversial -- set of linguistic issues.Betty McCardle, an official of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda who will coordinate the research, explains some of the sweeping questions the study will try to answer:"They come to kindergarten speaking Spanish.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 8, 1997
I bought my issue of the Final Call - the apocalyptically named newspaper of the Nation of Islam - in the usual place: the corner of Northern Parkway and Wabash Avenue. I slipped the nattily attired young man a buck and he handed me a paper.I had scanned the front-page headlines even before I bought the paper. "How the IRS wrecks lives," read one. Another read, "Activists struggle against alcohol, tobacco ads." It sounded like the stuff I could get in any newspaper. Were my friends in the Nation of Islam trying to go mainstream on me?
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 27, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- The conservative case for a welcoming policy toward immigrants is that the very act of immigrating is an act of entrepreneurship. Passive, risk-averse people do not immigrate. So immigration leavens a successful, complacency-prone society with a ferment for change from below.It is, therefore, appropriate that the campaign in California to make bilingual education voluntary, which would virtually end it, is being led by a conservative entrepreneur inspired by an insurrection of immigrant parents.
NEWS
September 18, 2002
A nationally known cartoonist and an expert in bilingual education will be the featured speakers during Hispanic Heritage Month at McDaniel College in Westminster. Co-sponsored by the McDaniel College Hispanic/Latino Alliance and the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the campus celebration that started Sunday and runs through Oct. 15 also features exhibits in Decker College Center. Hector Cantu, co-creator and writer of the newspaper comic strip "Baldo," takes the podium at 7 o'clock tonight in Baker Memorial Chapel.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | May 29, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- California is known for creating "wedge" issues -- measures that can divide the electorate for political effects. In the recent past they have included ending affirmative action and denying welfare to immigrants, each driving a wedge between racial minorities and whites.Another such wedge issue was supposed to be Proposition 227, which would essentially end bilingual education in the state.The expectation was that most white, English-speaking voters would approve of the proposal to immerse all students totally in English-language instruction for all their subjects, while non-English-speaking parents, particularly Spanish-speaking Latinos, would object.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 27, 2000
REPUBLICANS HAVE MADE some political hay in recent years by accusing Democrats of being the tax-and-spend party. Ronald Reagan rode into town on a dual platform of cutting taxes and reducing spending, along with the size of government. He managed to reduce taxes but he failed to slay the spending beast. The last Republican-dominated Congress behaved more like the party of FDR than the party of Ronald Reagan. The Department of Education, which Mr. Reagan pledged to eliminate, had its budget increased 17 percent by a Republican Congress, which added $2 billion more than what President Clinton had requested.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- Get ready for the next reading wars.The federal government is about to launch the most ambitious inquiry to date into how Hispanic children in the United States learn to read in English.The government plans to spend $45 million over five years to explore this complex -- and controversial -- set of linguistic issues.Betty McCardle, an official of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda who will coordinate the research, explains some of the sweeping questions the study will try to answer:"They come to kindergarten speaking Spanish.
NEWS
By George F. Will | August 29, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- Republicans may already have lost the fight for control of the House of Representatives throughout the next decade. They may have because California's GOP congressional delegation is at cross-purposes with a California Republican who became a sore winner while successfully pushing an initiative outlawing most bilingual education in California.Republicans currently have a five-seat majority in the House. California has 52 House seats (Democrats have 27, Republicans 24 and a special election will soon fill a seat a Democrat held until his death)
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 1999
TUCSON, Ariz. -- Three decades ago, this desert city was the birthplace of the national bilingual education movement, a point of pride among many Latinos here. For them, Spanish-language classrooms are as much a part of the local landscape as the saguaro cactus.This year, Ron Unz came to Tucson launching a voter initiative that would do away with bilingual education in Arizona, a plan nearly identical to the one he wrote and California voters approved last year.What really riles the bilingual faithful is that Unz has the support of a small group of disaffected Latino residents: teachers, parents and grandparents, some of them natives of Mexico.
NEWS
By Linda Chavez | June 16, 1998
IN THE WEEK since California voters overwhelmingly rejected bilingual education for children in their state, I've had some interesting conversations with political leaders, parents, teachers, researchers and journalists on what the vote will mean for non-English-speaking children around the country.Everyone agrees that Proposition 227, which received 61 percent of the California vote, marks an end to bilingual education as we know it. Nonetheless, a group of die-hard bilingual advocates has filed suit to block enforcement of the measure.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND AND JULES WITCOVER | May 29, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- California is known for creating "wedge" issues -- measures that can divide the electorate for political effects. In the recent past they have included ending affirmative action and denying welfare to immigrants, each driving a wedge between racial minorities and whites.Another such wedge issue was supposed to be Proposition 227, which would essentially end bilingual education in the state.The expectation was that most white, English-speaking voters would approve of the proposal to immerse all students totally in English-language instruction for all their subjects, while non-English-speaking parents, particularly Spanish-speaking Latinos, would object.
NEWS
December 30, 1996
IT IS ACCEPTED that many African Americans can speak both standard English and black English, which takes additional liberties and shortcuts with grammar and syntax. Some associate black English with illiteracy, but many well-educated African Americans use it when among friends and relatives who find the vernacular most familiar.The roots of black English are not certain. The frequent dropping of consonants may be traced to West Africa, where the slave trade flourished. Or the pattern of speech could have more to do with the poor education of rural Southern blacks who brought their customs, cuisine and way of speaking with them as they migrated north and west in the 1920s and '30s.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 5, 1995
INDIANAPOLIS -- Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole called yesterday for an end to most bilingual education and denounced new proposed standards for teaching history as he sought to cast his presidential bid as a defense of the nation's cultural heritage against divisive assaults by Washington and "intellectual elites."Attacking what he called the "embarrassed-to-be-American crowd," the leading candidate for the GOP presidential nomination told the 77th national convention of the American Legion that "if we are to return this country to greatness, we must do more than restore America's defenses."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 1998
MIAMI -- While California debates whether to stop teaching schoolchildren in two languages, the school system in this city at the crossroads of the Americas is expanding bilingual education under the argument that students will need to speak, read and write in English and Spanish when they reach the business world.Here in Miami, there was little protest and much praise when the school board endorsed a plan this year to increase bilingual teaching for all students -- not just those with limited English skills -- from kindergarten through 12th grade.
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 27, 1997
SAN FRANCISCO -- The conservative case for a welcoming policy toward immigrants is that the very act of immigrating is an act of entrepreneurship. Passive, risk-averse people do not immigrate. So immigration leavens a successful, complacency-prone society with a ferment for change from below.It is, therefore, appropriate that the campaign in California to make bilingual education voluntary, which would virtually end it, is being led by a conservative entrepreneur inspired by an insurrection of immigrant parents.
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