Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBiggest Loser
IN THE NEWS

Biggest Loser

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 28, 2011
When President Barack Obama released his long-form birth certificate yesterday, there were winners (sane people) and losers (Donald Trump).  But the biggest loser of all wasn't Trump. It was Jerome Corsi, along with his book "Where's the birth certificate?" and the WorldNetDaily "Superstore. "  Corsi's book, which recently hit No. 1 on Amazon.com before it has even been released (thanks to a huge plug from the Drudge Report), now has been completely overtaken by current events.  How can a book called "Where's the birth certificate?"
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Former NFL quarterback Scott Mitchell, who started a pair of games for the Ravens in 1999 and had a 12-year NFL career, will be featured on NBC's “The Biggest Loser,” a show in which people try to lose weight under the supervision of personal trainers. Mitchell currently weighs 366 pounds , but his NFL.com profile lists him at 240 pounds at the end of his playing career in 2001. He's currently listed as a bill collector, and according to the show's website, wants to get healthy for his family.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By New York Daily News | June 9, 1995
Gussie Mae, on the verge of becoming the biggest loser in the history of racing, finally won one. In his 86th career start, Gussie Mae won for the first time, capturing a maiden claiming race Wednesday night at Atlantic City Race Course by 2 1/2 lengths.Had he lost, he would have surpassed what is believed to be the record for most consecutive losses, which was set by Really a Tenor."I'm very relieved that we did it," said trainer Robert "Rocky" Marchiano. "This takes a lot of pressure off. Everyone was saying that we were going to make the record and then there werepeople saying we ought to retire him because he'll never win. It was a point that I had to prove, because I've been saying that he has the ability and the heart to win."
NEWS
November 17, 2012
I and many other active Catholics, and apparently including many in the clergy, are becoming more and more disgusted with our bishops. If marriage is only between a man and a woman according to natural law, and it is the most perfect way to live in family as human beings, as they proclaim, why have they wasted so many millions on interfering with state law and not working on a real problem in their own backyard. Why don't they have the courage to stand up and campaign against the "mandatory celibacy law" of our own priests - surely this is against the natural law, and it certainly didn't come from Jesus.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | June 14, 2007
Weight-loss reality TV shows: Fat March(ABC): Debuts in August. A dozen overweight individuals attempt a 550-mile, 10-week walk from Boston to Washington for a chance to share a $1.2 million prize. The Biggest Loser (NBC): October 2004 to present. Fourteen contestants compete for a grand prize of $250,000, enduring challenges, temptations, weigh-ins and eliminations until the final contestant remains to claim the title of the biggest loser. Mo'Nique's Fat Chance (Oxygen): August 2005 to present.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 23, 2008
Can't believe my good fortune. The producers of The Biggest Loser, NBC's hit weight-loss reality show, will be in Pompano Beach today casting for next season. Loser recruits overweight people to go on a weight-loss program and compete for a huge monetary prize, in this case $250,000. The only problem with this casting call is that the show is looking for teams of two to make a combined effort to lose the most weight. I wonder if Sidney Ponson is doing anything today.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | June 14, 2007
Loralie Thomas walked the manicured grounds of the city's Federal Hill Park on Tuesday and delighted in seeing so many families enjoying the sunny outdoors. She and her husband look forward to starting their own family someday, but for now, that's out of the question. Her doctor recently deemed her too fat to bear children. Those words were enough for the formerly 241-pound Chicago resident to get off the dieting roller coaster and switch to the new, exciting way to lose weight: reality television.
NEWS
By Jeannine Stein and Jeannine Stein,Los Angeles Times | November 17, 2008
On The Biggest Loser, contestants arrive fat and leave thin. And, in between, they go through an intense fitness regimen that is, to put a good face on it, grueling. The hours-long, athlete-level routines take place from the get-go. Some contestants have completed a quasi-mini-triathlon consisting of a 250-meter swim, a 2-mile bike ride and a climb up 42 flights of stairs. Others have pulled airplanes down a runway or climbed up and down a hill as many times as they could from sunup to sundown - not just sweating copiously but sometimes feeling dizzy, vomiting and crying.
BUSINESS
By Tom Petruno | May 29, 2005
In the TV reality show The Biggest Loser, overweight contestants get serious about trimming down and getting healthy. The fun for viewers is in trying to pick the ultimate loser/winner. Wall Street lately has been focused on its own version of The Biggest Loser. This game entails trying to guess which hedge fund has made enough bad trading bets to wipe itself out and cause a domino effect, perhaps toppling a major bank or brokerage. It has become convenient in recent years to blame hedge funds for every market hiccup or anomaly.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 20, 2006
A Christmas tree sprouts up in the lobby of a government building, and, instead of holiday spirits, it raises one of the thorniest issues in American civic life. Not the church-state thing. This time, it's Ravens versus Steelers. In the state office building at 1100 N. Eutaw St. in Baltimore, workers decked a tree with silver, red and green balls. But standard Christmas colors don't cut it in Ravenstown. Somebody added a purple ball with the Ravens logo. No problem until last week, when the guy who oversees the building - a Pittsburgh native and (surprise, surprise)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
UPDATES WITH LINK TO RESPONSE POST BY GRETA VAN SUSTEREN: After watching coverage of the Wisconsin recall, I am convinced more than ever that it's time for a major press gut check. We have been in real trouble for a long time with cable TV news, but we truly have reached a new low of partisanship at MSNBC and Fox News -- and confusion at CNN. It's the confusion part at CNN that has me truly worried these days. Monday night after watching cable TV, I wrote about being "dismayed" by the polarized place that MSNBC and Fox News had come to. Scott Walker, the Republican governor, wouldn't talk to MSNBC, and Tom Barrett, the Democratic challenger, wouldn't come on Fox. Who could blame them?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 28, 2011
When President Barack Obama released his long-form birth certificate yesterday, there were winners (sane people) and losers (Donald Trump).  But the biggest loser of all wasn't Trump. It was Jerome Corsi, along with his book "Where's the birth certificate?" and the WorldNetDaily "Superstore. "  Corsi's book, which recently hit No. 1 on Amazon.com before it has even been released (thanks to a huge plug from the Drudge Report), now has been completely overtaken by current events.  How can a book called "Where's the birth certificate?"
NEWS
By Jeannine Stein and Jeannine Stein,Los Angeles Times | November 17, 2008
On The Biggest Loser, contestants arrive fat and leave thin. And, in between, they go through an intense fitness regimen that is, to put a good face on it, grueling. The hours-long, athlete-level routines take place from the get-go. Some contestants have completed a quasi-mini-triathlon consisting of a 250-meter swim, a 2-mile bike ride and a climb up 42 flights of stairs. Others have pulled airplanes down a runway or climbed up and down a hill as many times as they could from sunup to sundown - not just sweating copiously but sometimes feeling dizzy, vomiting and crying.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 23, 2008
Can't believe my good fortune. The producers of The Biggest Loser, NBC's hit weight-loss reality show, will be in Pompano Beach today casting for next season. Loser recruits overweight people to go on a weight-loss program and compete for a huge monetary prize, in this case $250,000. The only problem with this casting call is that the show is looking for teams of two to make a combined effort to lose the most weight. I wonder if Sidney Ponson is doing anything today.
FEATURES
November 20, 2007
Khartoum's newfound oil wealth set the stage for conflict with the long-neglected region of Darfur in western Sudan, where rebel groups emerged to claim a share of the country's burgeoning wealth. In response, the Sudanese government armed a proxy militia and unleashed the so-called "Devils on Horseback" on the rebels and civilian farmers in a stampede of brutality. Over the past four years, at least 200,000 people have been killed, 2.5 million driven from their homes, and mass rapes have been used as a weapon of war. Now PBS' Frontline asks why the international community and the United Nations has failed to stop the slaughter, in the documentary On Our Watch.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | June 14, 2007
Weight-loss reality TV shows: Fat March(ABC): Debuts in August. A dozen overweight individuals attempt a 550-mile, 10-week walk from Boston to Washington for a chance to share a $1.2 million prize. The Biggest Loser (NBC): October 2004 to present. Fourteen contestants compete for a grand prize of $250,000, enduring challenges, temptations, weigh-ins and eliminations until the final contestant remains to claim the title of the biggest loser. Mo'Nique's Fat Chance (Oxygen): August 2005 to present.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 23, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks fell yesterday for a second day, led by shares of oil industry companies such as Exxon Corp. and Schlumberger Ltd., as crude prices dropped to four-year lows.Unexpectedly weak profits and gloomy forecasts from retailer Sears, Roebuck & Co., software company Sybase Inc. and computer chip maker Altera Corp. contributed to the decline.The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 63.52, to 7,730.88. Philip Morris Cos., maker of Marlboro cigarettes, was the average's biggest loser, falling 2.3125, to 41.9375 on the second day of Minnesota's trial to recoup health-related costs from tobacco companies.
NEWS
May 6, 1994
Congratulations to the Houses of Representatives for restoring Americans' faith in democracy. For years, polls have shown that the American people want stricter controls on weapons of crime, especially the so-called assault-style or military-style weapons that fire large numbers of rounds in rapid-fire order. Yet every attempt to legislate against these weapons had failed -- till yesterday. Thursday's vote of 216-214 in favor of a ban was quite a change from the 1991 vote of 247-177 against banning these weapons.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | June 14, 2007
Loralie Thomas walked the manicured grounds of the city's Federal Hill Park on Tuesday and delighted in seeing so many families enjoying the sunny outdoors. She and her husband look forward to starting their own family someday, but for now, that's out of the question. Her doctor recently deemed her too fat to bear children. Those words were enough for the formerly 241-pound Chicago resident to get off the dieting roller coaster and switch to the new, exciting way to lose weight: reality television.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 20, 2006
A Christmas tree sprouts up in the lobby of a government building, and, instead of holiday spirits, it raises one of the thorniest issues in American civic life. Not the church-state thing. This time, it's Ravens versus Steelers. In the state office building at 1100 N. Eutaw St. in Baltimore, workers decked a tree with silver, red and green balls. But standard Christmas colors don't cut it in Ravenstown. Somebody added a purple ball with the Ravens logo. No problem until last week, when the guy who oversees the building - a Pittsburgh native and (surprise, surprise)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.