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By Ruth Sadler | August 4, 1991
Many collectors have discovered Cal Ripken this season.As he adds to his games streak and compiles MVP batting statistics, his rookie and second-year cards are getting more popular.Longtime Ripken fans didn't wait for this year. They've been gathering Ripken material for years.One of the Baltimore Orioles shortstop's more dedicated fans is Bill Haelig of Reading, Pa.His note paper has a picture of Cal, Bill and Cal Ripken Sr. and contains the legend, "The Ripkens' Biggest Fan." His envelopes carry a picture of the shortstop at bat and the words "Cal Ripken Jr.'s Biggest Fan."
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SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | May 4, 2014
Remember when WWE Extreme Rules used to feature “extreme” matches? Before 2012, Extreme Rules (or One Night Stand, as it was previously called) was a pay-per-view event that featured big stipulations in every match. In 2012 and 2013, although not every match had these stipulations, a majority of the matches still were considered “extreme.” This year, even if you include the WeeLC match, there are only three matches that have an extreme stipulation to them. Now, that doesn't mean that this won't be a good pay-per-view.
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SPORTS
By Sam Davis and Sam Davis,Staff Writer | April 9, 1992
Southern High's Kwame Evans, an All-Metro first-team pick the past two years, said Tuesday that he will sign a letter of intent with George Washington University when the NCAA signing period begins Wednesday.Evans, a 6-foot-6 shooting guard, has visited George Washington, but canceled visits with Temple, Miami (Fla.), Penn State and Providence."I pretty much made up my mind after my visit [last month], but I didn't want to tell anyone," Evans said, adding that GW coach Mike Jarvis and assistant Eddie Meyers "have the type of learning system at George Washington like we have at Southern.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
George Herman Ruth Jr., the pride of Pigtown, stayed in the game too long. In his last season and playing for the Boston Braves in 1935, the legendary Babe batted .181, could barely trot around the bases and stuck around mostly because he thought he'd be offered the manager's job, which he wasn't. The greatest baseball player in history retired just two months into his worst season playing for one of the losingest teams in the modern era. The sporting world is filled with cautionary tales of athletes who retired too late or staged unsuccessful comebacks.
FEATURES
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
The holy grail of Cal Ripken memorabilia is a 2 1/2 -by-3 1/2 -inch piece of 14-year-old cardboard. It features a bland picture of the 19-year-old "infielder" when he played for the minor-league Charlotte Orioles.And Bill Haelig of Reading, Pa., the Indiana Jones of Ripken collectors, has hunted one down. The man who bills himself as Cal Ripken's biggest fan -- and backs it up with what is apparently the largest collection of Ripken memorabilia -- recently rejected $4,000 for his card.The quest for the elusive card -- Mr. Haelig says probably fewer than 100 exist -- separates the really serious collectors from the thousands of seemingly normal adults who covet anything associated with the Oriole shortstop.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1997
From: Peter JensenBaltimore SunBaltimore, Md.To: Frances McDormandBest Actress Oscar Winnerc/o Gramercy PicturesBeverly Hills, Calif.Dear Fran:Congratulations on your big win the other night at the Academy Awards! You sure have come a long way since we performed together on the stage of Bethany College -- the self-proclaimed "Small College of Distinction" in the northern panhandle of West Virginia.You haven't changed at all. Really. You look exactly the same as you did in 1979, although you tended to dress more informally than you did on Oscar night.
SPORTS
By Aaron Oster | May 4, 2014
Remember when WWE Extreme Rules used to feature “extreme” matches? Before 2012, Extreme Rules (or One Night Stand, as it was previously called) was a pay-per-view event that featured big stipulations in every match. In 2012 and 2013, although not every match had these stipulations, a majority of the matches still were considered “extreme.” This year, even if you include the WeeLC match, there are only three matches that have an extreme stipulation to them. Now, that doesn't mean that this won't be a good pay-per-view.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck | September 30, 2007
Anyone who was born and raised in Dundalk as I was has had to endure countless jokes and putdowns. That's why I always swell up with pride whenever a fellow Dundalkian accomplishes something of significance. And I have never been prouder than I was when I learned that the winner of WWE's Biggest Fan contest is from Dundalk. Mike Timpson, Dundalk High School Class of 1987, was announced as the winner of the $25,000 grand prize last month in New York. To enter the contest, one had to submit a 60-second video that demonstrated why he or she was WWE's biggest fan. Timpson, who moved to Los Angeles seven years ago, was one of 15 finalists who were flown to New York during SummerSlam weekend.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
ST. LOUIS -- Home run king Mark McGwire would love to share the spotlight with some of his St. Louis Cardinals teammates, but it just doesn't work that way. It's a team game, but this is a one-man show.Outfielder Brian Jordan, who's having a pretty good year himself, has come to grips with that, even though it probably is going to cost him some money.The former Milford Mill star entered the weekend batting .315 with 23 home runs and 80 RBIs. He's eligible for free agency at the end of the season -- and figures to be in great demand -- but he'll have to wait until November to get any attention.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
At St. Frances Academy in East Baltimore, the most ardent sports fan is the one on the bench in a black habit and veil. If the Panthers are playing, Sister John Francis Schilling, president of the East Baltimore school, is cheering. "She's like another coach or a general manager on the sidelines," said Mark Karcher, boys basketball coach. "If I have a bad game, she will get on me. " Sister Schilling also keeps the stats and writes a weekly blog detailing nuances of the games. "I keep record of the rebounds, assists, turnovers and steals," she said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
At St. Frances Academy in East Baltimore, the most ardent sports fan is the one on the bench in a black habit and veil. If the Panthers are playing, Sister John Francis Schilling, president of the East Baltimore school, is cheering. "She's like another coach or a general manager on the sidelines," said Mark Karcher, boys basketball coach. "If I have a bad game, she will get on me. " Sister Schilling also keeps the stats and writes a weekly blog detailing nuances of the games. "I keep record of the rebounds, assists, turnovers and steals," she said.
SPORTS
By Kevin Eck | September 30, 2007
Anyone who was born and raised in Dundalk as I was has had to endure countless jokes and putdowns. That's why I always swell up with pride whenever a fellow Dundalkian accomplishes something of significance. And I have never been prouder than I was when I learned that the winner of WWE's Biggest Fan contest is from Dundalk. Mike Timpson, Dundalk High School Class of 1987, was announced as the winner of the $25,000 grand prize last month in New York. To enter the contest, one had to submit a 60-second video that demonstrated why he or she was WWE's biggest fan. Timpson, who moved to Los Angeles seven years ago, was one of 15 finalists who were flown to New York during SummerSlam weekend.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 2001
Rick Stohler has straddled two worlds in his professional life - the theater and the classroom. Those who have seen him perform on stage or teach a room full of third-graders agree that in either arena, Stohler is a star. A resident of Columbia, he developed a passion for performing in high school but decided on a career in education. Stohler taught third grade in Virginia from 1977 to 1983, but the lure of the spotlight drew him to performances at area dinner theaters at night. "I was working morning, noon and night," he said.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and By Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2001
HOBOKEN, N.J. - Yeah, yeah, yeah. New York, New York. The Big Apple. The city that never sleeps. The town so nice they named it twice, and blahty, blahty, blahty. But home of the New York Giants? Fuh-get-about it. That is, if you ask the people of New Jersey. While Baltimore is not only bathing but drowning in purple as Super Bowl XXXV nears, walk around Manhattan, and there's scarcely an acknowledgment that the Giants still have a season under way. And it's not easy to find euphoria over the team anywhere else, either.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
ST. LOUIS -- Home run king Mark McGwire would love to share the spotlight with some of his St. Louis Cardinals teammates, but it just doesn't work that way. It's a team game, but this is a one-man show.Outfielder Brian Jordan, who's having a pretty good year himself, has come to grips with that, even though it probably is going to cost him some money.The former Milford Mill star entered the weekend batting .315 with 23 home runs and 80 RBIs. He's eligible for free agency at the end of the season -- and figures to be in great demand -- but he'll have to wait until November to get any attention.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1997
From: Peter JensenBaltimore SunBaltimore, Md.To: Frances McDormandBest Actress Oscar Winnerc/o Gramercy PicturesBeverly Hills, Calif.Dear Fran:Congratulations on your big win the other night at the Academy Awards! You sure have come a long way since we performed together on the stage of Bethany College -- the self-proclaimed "Small College of Distinction" in the northern panhandle of West Virginia.You haven't changed at all. Really. You look exactly the same as you did in 1979, although you tended to dress more informally than you did on Oscar night.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff Writer | June 28, 1992
Tracey Sturm's 5-foot-1, 120-pound body struggled to squeeze through a wave of enthusiastic boxing fans.Her husband of five years, Chuck, had just emerged from the ring after winning a bruising unanimous decision over Ohio's Tony Ruthledge.It was Sturm's comeback fight after a 19-month layoff due to an eye injury, and his first appearance in the county in three years.The post-fight chaos could have been ripped straight from the script of a Rocky movie -- only it happened Thursday night in Glen Burnie's Michael's Eighth Avenue -- as the nearly 600 partisan fans showered their love on Sturm, a Millersville native.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 2001
Rick Stohler has straddled two worlds in his professional life - the theater and the classroom. Those who have seen him perform on stage or teach a room full of third-graders agree that in either arena, Stohler is a star. A resident of Columbia, he developed a passion for performing in high school but decided on a career in education. Stohler taught third grade in Virginia from 1977 to 1983, but the lure of the spotlight drew him to performances at area dinner theaters at night. "I was working morning, noon and night," he said.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
I am in the Dawg Pound with time running out on the Browns in Cleveland, and I am busily lying to my interrogator, a burly man with a red nose dressed head to toe in Browns regalia. Oh, and his face is painted to look like -- what else? -- a dawg."Who me?" I say. "I'm with the Boston Globe."Cherry bombs are exploding, beer cans are being hurled into the air, women are undressing, an entire stadium is being disassembled and, oh yeah, a football game is climaxing. Yet I am convinced that if my unfortunate affiliation becomes known here, all other activity will immediately cease.
FEATURES
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Staff Writer | February 27, 1994
The holy grail of Cal Ripken memorabilia is a 2 1/2 -by-3 1/2 -inch piece of 14-year-old cardboard. It features a bland picture of the 19-year-old "infielder" when he played for the minor-league Charlotte Orioles.And Bill Haelig of Reading, Pa., the Indiana Jones of Ripken collectors, has hunted one down. The man who bills himself as Cal Ripken's biggest fan -- and backs it up with what is apparently the largest collection of Ripken memorabilia -- recently rejected $4,000 for his card.The quest for the elusive card -- Mr. Haelig says probably fewer than 100 exist -- separates the really serious collectors from the thousands of seemingly normal adults who covet anything associated with the Oriole shortstop.
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