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By Tony Johnston | December 29, 1999
Editor's note: This retelling of the familiar fairy tale is set in an old-growth forest and features Bigfoot characters.Once upon a time, in the old-growth forest, a band of Bigfoots lived. An enormous snag towered above the other trees close to their camp. Inside its hollow halls of bark lived a dashing Bigfoot prince.He was tall and dark as a Douglas fir -- with feet like cedar stumps. He was oderiferous as his tree-home was coniferous. And so horrendously hairy that Bigfoot women near and far longed to marry him.Now, every year the Bigfoot prince gave a great fun-fest.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
When Robert Marbury was 19 years old, he necked with Ricki Lake on camera. At age 29, he spent a year sailing in Indonesia, where he says his ship was attacked by pirates. Four years later, he was one of the three co-founders of the Minnesota Association of Rogue Taxidermists. At age 34, one of his photographs of stuffed animals tied to car grilles was featured in The New York Times - the first of several articles in that august publication in which Marbury has been quoted. And this coming weekend, the 41-year-old Marbury will preside over an installation at Artscape that includes a 7-foot tall Bigfoot swathed in fake fur, as well as a pond from which visitors can fish for canned soda and beer.
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NEWS
By Nick Lyons and Nick Lyons,Special to The Sun | July 16, 1995
"Where Bigfoot Walks: Crossing the Dark Divide," by Robert Michael Pyle. Photographs. New York: Houghton Mifflin. 338 pages. $21.95'We know that Bigfoot is one big metaphor," admits Robert Michael Pyle toward the end of this delicious inquiry into the Northwest's elusive Sasquatch, "a model for wildness, the unknown, tumid and hirsute desires with no names, the godforsaken exile. But metaphors can get up and walk." Under Pyle's ministrations, this one does just that. By the time he winds down his journeys and ruminations, we're on rather intimate terms with the "big galoot.
NEWS
By Linda Florea and Linda Florea,ORLANDO SENTINEL | November 26, 2004
LAKELAND, Fla. - Urban legends are supposed to be legends and that's all. But if you ask Jennifer Ward about the Florida skunk ape, she will tell you it stepped out of the mists of myth and into reality. "I never thought anything like that was out there before," Ward, 30, said last week. "But I know there is now." Ward's encounter with the hairy creature came in August, about a week after Hurricane Charley, along a rural stretch of road as she was driving home from a friend's house. Her daughters were asleep in the back seat; it was nearly dusk.
NEWS
By MAUREEN RICE | November 2, 1993
On the average day, you won't find Bigfoot anywhere near Carroll County, but Halloween brings out the strangest creatures.Bigfoot stalked men, women and children Friday night at the McKeldon area of Patapsco State Park in Marriottsville.Some, especially the very young, were actually frightened, but most roared back and continued on their way undaunted.Bigfoot may not return next year, but the other spooks and hauntings probably will, in what will be the 12th annual Halloween Spook Hike at the park.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and his top aides spent the week hunkered down as Republicans pushed hearings into Whitewater and Waco, and the war in Bosnia divided the Western allies.Several presidential advisers have convinced themselves that nothing was ever this bad for a president; that Washington is meaner, Congress more partisan, world affairs more tangled than ever.Surely, the world is a perilous place. Just as surely, Congress' restive Republicans are feeling their oats.But there is another reason why Mr. Clinton often seems to be knee-deep in a cow pasture without any boots.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | May 4, 1993
Pizza Hut announced yesterday that because of the test-market success of its new Bigfoot pizza, it is adding 50,000 permanent part-time jobs at its restaurants.Pizza Hut, a subsidiary of Pepsico Inc., operates more than 7,000 American restaurants and delivery units and more than 2,000 outlets in 73 foreign countries."It's a gratifying feeling to be hiring this many new employees at a time when our economy needs a real boost," said Allan Huston, Pizza Hut's chairman and chief executive.The new jobs, which will include delivery driver, cashier, food server and dough master, will boost Pizza Hut's 235,000 systemwide employee base by 21 percent, a Pizza Hut spokesman said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | April 30, 1993
Hasta la pizza, baby. Here comes The Dominator.Boasting that it has created the biggest, baddest hunka-hunka melted cheese on the market, Domino's Pizza Inc. lurched into the monster pizza wars yesterday with a 30-inch, 30-slice pie in the face of its competitors.Brought to life in Domino's laboratories in Ann Arbor, Mich., The Dominator will grapple with Pizza Hut's Bigfoot and Little Caesar's Big! Big! Pizza for the biggest bite of the market for carry-out pizza with a gland condition.Domino's rectangular Dominator will measure a Schwarzeneggerian 10 inches by 30 inches.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | July 11, 2001
I WAS DAYDREAMING about dessert, scanning Web sites looking for provocative photos of raspberries and strawberries, when I saw a mention of a berry that I had never heard of: the dewberry. Not only was this berry edible, it was also local. It grew right here in Maryland; an encyclopedia said so. "The Western shore of Maryland," declared an online version of the World Book, "has many kinds of berries, including blackberries, dewberries, raspberries and wild strawberries." Dewberries? Say what?
NEWS
By Linda Florea and Linda Florea,ORLANDO SENTINEL | November 26, 2004
LAKELAND, Fla. - Urban legends are supposed to be legends and that's all. But if you ask Jennifer Ward about the Florida skunk ape, she will tell you it stepped out of the mists of myth and into reality. "I never thought anything like that was out there before," Ward, 30, said last week. "But I know there is now." Ward's encounter with the hairy creature came in August, about a week after Hurricane Charley, along a rural stretch of road as she was driving home from a friend's house. Her daughters were asleep in the back seat; it was nearly dusk.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2003
Dunkadelic. Until several months ago it was a word in hardly anybody's vocabulary, not even a slang word used by kids on the street. Then sportswear giant Reebok International Ltd. created a shoe with the Dunkadelic name, promoting it with powerhouse NBA players. A name that didn't exist before suddenly becoming popular. Sports commentators even used it to describe star hoopsters. But Baltimore entrepreneur Derrick E. Vaughan said he thought of the name before Reebok, and he's got a 1997 trademark to prove it. He's filed a $200 million lawsuit against the sneaker company in U.S. District Court in Baltimore for using the Dunkadelic name and reaping huge profits while his company suffered.
NEWS
By HEARST NEWSPAPERS | September 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - After nearly a year of constant public appearances, Attorney General John Ashcroft has become the Bush administration's Bigfoot - the mythical, rarely seen figure who shows up only briefly before quickly ducking away. Until he made a few appearances last week marking the anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, Ashcroft - a long-time politician who seems to enjoy the limelight - had kept an unusually low profile during the past three months. The trigger for Ashcroft's vanishing act, according to news reports, was a run-in with the White House after he overstated the case against alleged terrorist Jose Padilla, who was initially accused of plotting to detonate a radioactive "dirty bomb."
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | July 11, 2001
I WAS DAYDREAMING about dessert, scanning Web sites looking for provocative photos of raspberries and strawberries, when I saw a mention of a berry that I had never heard of: the dewberry. Not only was this berry edible, it was also local. It grew right here in Maryland; an encyclopedia said so. "The Western shore of Maryland," declared an online version of the World Book, "has many kinds of berries, including blackberries, dewberries, raspberries and wild strawberries." Dewberries? Say what?
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2000
COLLEGE PARK - Brooks Barnard walked across the Maryland campus last Monday and soaked up all the adulation from his many sudden admirers. "Aren't you the punter," said one fellow student, slightly in awe? "Hey, boomer," said another passerby. Barnard's backup punter, Vedad Siljkovic, even honored him with a drawing on the blackboard, depicting Barnard kicking the ball high across the field with some calculus formulas decorating the flight of the ball. All kind of messages from family members and friends were left on Barnard's answering machine.
FEATURES
By Tony Johnston | December 29, 1999
Editor's note: This retelling of the familiar fairy tale is set in an old-growth forest and features Bigfoot characters.Once upon a time, in the old-growth forest, a band of Bigfoots lived. An enormous snag towered above the other trees close to their camp. Inside its hollow halls of bark lived a dashing Bigfoot prince.He was tall and dark as a Douglas fir -- with feet like cedar stumps. He was oderiferous as his tree-home was coniferous. And so horrendously hairy that Bigfoot women near and far longed to marry him.Now, every year the Bigfoot prince gave a great fun-fest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | February 14, 1999
CARSON, Wash. -- Go ahead. Make a monkey out of Sasquatch, say folks in this tiny town in the heart of Bigfoot country. That won't stop them from throwing their annual bash for the big galoot.Or from believing -- or at least wanting to believe -- that Sasquatch, the man-beast also known as Bigfoot, still exists somewhere in the Pacific Northwest. True believers haven't missed a beat since two of their flock broke ranks last month to debunk the most famous home movie since the Zapruder film.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | February 14, 1999
CARSON, Wash. -- Go ahead. Make a monkey out of Sasquatch, say folks in this tiny town in the heart of Bigfoot country. That won't stop them from throwing their annual bash for the big galoot.Or from believing -- or at least wanting to believe -- that Sasquatch, the man-beast also known as Bigfoot, still exists somewhere in the Pacific Northwest. True believers haven't missed a beat since two of their flock broke ranks last month to debunk the most famous home movie since the Zapruder film.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
When Robert Marbury was 19 years old, he necked with Ricki Lake on camera. At age 29, he spent a year sailing in Indonesia, where he says his ship was attacked by pirates. Four years later, he was one of the three co-founders of the Minnesota Association of Rogue Taxidermists. At age 34, one of his photographs of stuffed animals tied to car grilles was featured in The New York Times - the first of several articles in that august publication in which Marbury has been quoted. And this coming weekend, the 41-year-old Marbury will preside over an installation at Artscape that includes a 7-foot tall Bigfoot swathed in fake fur, as well as a pond from which visitors can fish for canned soda and beer.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and his top aides spent the week hunkered down as Republicans pushed hearings into Whitewater and Waco, and the war in Bosnia divided the Western allies.Several presidential advisers have convinced themselves that nothing was ever this bad for a president; that Washington is meaner, Congress more partisan, world affairs more tangled than ever.Surely, the world is a perilous place. Just as surely, Congress' restive Republicans are feeling their oats.But there is another reason why Mr. Clinton often seems to be knee-deep in a cow pasture without any boots.
NEWS
By Nick Lyons and Nick Lyons,Special to The Sun | July 16, 1995
"Where Bigfoot Walks: Crossing the Dark Divide," by Robert Michael Pyle. Photographs. New York: Houghton Mifflin. 338 pages. $21.95'We know that Bigfoot is one big metaphor," admits Robert Michael Pyle toward the end of this delicious inquiry into the Northwest's elusive Sasquatch, "a model for wildness, the unknown, tumid and hirsute desires with no names, the godforsaken exile. But metaphors can get up and walk." Under Pyle's ministrations, this one does just that. By the time he winds down his journeys and ruminations, we're on rather intimate terms with the "big galoot.
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