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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2012
There was only one brief moment when it appeared that Torrey Smith's decision to play might backfire. After catching a 43-yard pass from quarterback Joe Flacco and getting his helmet yanked back by New York Giants cornerback Corey Webster more than midway through the first quarter, the wide receiver - who suffered a concussion in the Ravens' game against the Denver Broncos last week - looked woozy and unsteady on his feet. But the alarm was fleeting, and Smith said he never considered leaving the contest and standing on the sideline for an extended period of time.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 13, 2014
On a purely strategic level, there's no reason to look for any deeper meaning in the decision by the Orioles on Tuesday to call up top pitching prospect Kevin Gausman and insert him into the starting rotation to face Justin Verlander in the series finale against the Detroit Tigers on Wednesday afternoon. No great mystery there. The Tigers are 9-2 against left-handed starters this season, and Wei-Yin Chen - who happens to throw from that side - matches up better against the Kansas City Royals and can use the extra day off. The alternative to bringing up Gausman was to send Miguel Gonzalez back to the mound on three days' rest against one of the most dangerous lineups in baseball after delivering his longest outing of the year on Saturday night.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
The Ravens won Thursday's battle at M&T Bank Stadium, 22-20, but Baltimore and Pittsburgh essentially finished in a tie in TV viewing of the game. Both audiences were big. In Pittsburgh, the game drew a 38.3 rating and 63 share, while in Baltimore it drew a 37.8 rating and 64 share. Rough translation: two out of every five TV households in those markets were tuned to the game, and three out of every five sets in use Thanksgiving night were on NBC's coverage. Tipping the scale in Baltimore's favor as the home of more serious fans is the fact that the game was in Baltimore and 71,000 were in the stands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
The Ravens won Thursday's battle at M&T Bank Stadium, 22-20, but Baltimore and Pittsburgh essentially finished in a tie in TV viewing of the game. Both audiences were big. In Pittsburgh, the game drew a 38.3 rating and 63 share, while in Baltimore it drew a 37.8 rating and 64 share. Rough translation: two out of every five TV households in those markets were tuned to the game, and three out of every five sets in use Thanksgiving night were on NBC's coverage. Tipping the scale in Baltimore's favor as the home of more serious fans is the fact that the game was in Baltimore and 71,000 were in the stands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Kline and Andy Rosen | October 15, 2012
Don't you just hate it when you're trying to lie your way out of a dinner party and the only way you can get the guy you just stabbed to shut up is by snapping his neck? Nicholas Brody's been there. Brody's bad day, at the center of this week's "Homeland" installment, showed him growing increasingly desperate as he loses control of both halves of his double life. Trying to satisfy his obligations to his family, his political allies and his terrorist bosses, he fails all of them. Carrie is attempting to walk a thin line of her own in Episode 3 of Season 2, between crippling mental illness and idiosyncratic obsession with work.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 13, 2014
On a purely strategic level, there's no reason to look for any deeper meaning in the decision by the Orioles on Tuesday to call up top pitching prospect Kevin Gausman and insert him into the starting rotation to face Justin Verlander in the series finale against the Detroit Tigers on Wednesday afternoon. No great mystery there. The Tigers are 9-2 against left-handed starters this season, and Wei-Yin Chen - who happens to throw from that side - matches up better against the Kansas City Royals and can use the extra day off. The alternative to bringing up Gausman was to send Miguel Gonzalez back to the mound on three days' rest against one of the most dangerous lineups in baseball after delivering his longest outing of the year on Saturday night.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Sun reporter | January 21, 2002
The Ravens' reign unceremoniously ended with a resounding rout. Undone by a tired defense and a tiresome offense, the defending champions were ripped off the throne with a humbling, 27-10 defeat to the Pittsburgh Steelers yesterday before 63,976 at Heinz Field. Staggering instead of swaggering in their AFC divisional playoff game, the Ravens suffered the worst postseason defeat of any defending champion in 18 years.The offense folded to the relentless Steelers pressure, committing four turnovers and producing a season-worst 150 yards.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
Two luxury condominium complexes alongside Baltimore's waterfront will have to pay nearly $2.3 million in additional property taxes this year, thanks to new assessed values that acknowledge — four years after the first residents moved in — that the buildings' empty units actually exist. The almost 190 units still owned by the developers of the Ritz-Carlton Residences and Silo Point had been taxed as if they were empty lots, even as residents were paying high-end prices – frequently more than $1 million in the case of the Ritz — to live in other condos in the same buildings.
FEATURES
By Rick Selvin and Rick Selvin,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 9, 1996
John Travolta's into it. So are Michael Jackson, Tom Cruise, Kirstie Alley and Chick Corea.It's Scientology, the religious philosophy developed by late science-fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard.The roots of Scientology began with Hubbard's 1950 publication of "Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health," a system he described as "a methodology which can help alleviate such ailments as unwanted sensations and emotions, irrational fears and psychosomatic illnesses."It evolved into a religion with scriptures, a creed and all the other trappings.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1994
There's probably only one person in Baltimore who is not terrified at the prospect of seeing Frank Thomas at Camden Yards this weekend, and that's Mike Mussina.How's that, you ask, since the Chicago White Sox first baseman has a career .619 batting average against Mussina with four home runs, including one last weekend at Comiskey Park?Mussina, mercifully, has the weekend off and won't see Thomas again until later in the year.There's hardly a pitcher alive who wants to face Thomas at any time, but certainly not now when the ball is jumping off his bat, to the tune of 21 home runs in the first two months of the season.
NEWS
svanessen2@hotmail.com | November 5, 2013
The Rev. Mary Gaut has been accepted as a 2014 fellow by GreenFaith, an interfaith organization promoting environmental stewardship. The GreenFaith website says "the Fellowship Program is the first comprehensive education and training program in the US to prepare lay and ordained leaders from diverse religious traditions for religiously based environmental leadership. The Fellowship curriculum is designed to integrate historical perspectives, scientific information, socio-economic considerations, religious, ethical, spiritual and practical dimensions.
SPORTS
By Gene Wang and The Washington Post | February 15, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - Three days after a dispiriting loss to its most bitter rival, the No. 7 Maryland women's basketball team got resurgent performances from its top two players and opened the second half with a decisive flurry to beat Clemson, 75-45, Thursday night at Comcast Center. Senior forward Tianna Hawkins scored 17 of her game-high 30 points in the first half and junior forward Alyssa Thomas added 17 points, including 13 after halftime, as the Terps picked up their ninth win in 10 games and bounced back after Monday's 71-56 loss against No. 5 Duke in Durham, N.C. Hawkins and Thomas combined to make 17 of 30 shots against Clemson after missing 23 of 30 field-goal attempts Monday.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2012
There was only one brief moment when it appeared that Torrey Smith's decision to play might backfire. After catching a 43-yard pass from quarterback Joe Flacco and getting his helmet yanked back by New York Giants cornerback Corey Webster more than midway through the first quarter, the wide receiver - who suffered a concussion in the Ravens' game against the Denver Broncos last week - looked woozy and unsteady on his feet. But the alarm was fleeting, and Smith said he never considered leaving the contest and standing on the sideline for an extended period of time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2012
Outside of Barack Obama, one of Tuesday's biggest winners was CNN, which not only presented the best journalism but also finished first among cable channels in viewers. According to Nielsen's Fast Ratings, CNN was seen by an average audience of 8.8 million total viewers from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m. election night. It also had audiences of 4.4 million adults ages 25 to 54 and 2.7 million viewers between the ages of 18 and 34. That topped perennial ratings winner Fox News, which had an audience of 8.7 million total viewers, with 3.5 million and 1.2 million in the key demos.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Kline and Andy Rosen | October 15, 2012
Don't you just hate it when you're trying to lie your way out of a dinner party and the only way you can get the guy you just stabbed to shut up is by snapping his neck? Nicholas Brody's been there. Brody's bad day, at the center of this week's "Homeland" installment, showed him growing increasingly desperate as he loses control of both halves of his double life. Trying to satisfy his obligations to his family, his political allies and his terrorist bosses, he fails all of them. Carrie is attempting to walk a thin line of her own in Episode 3 of Season 2, between crippling mental illness and idiosyncratic obsession with work.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2012
Two luxury condominium complexes alongside Baltimore's waterfront will have to pay nearly $2.3 million in additional property taxes this year, thanks to new assessed values that acknowledge — four years after the first residents moved in — that the buildings' empty units actually exist. The almost 190 units still owned by the developers of the Ritz-Carlton Residences and Silo Point had been taxed as if they were empty lots, even as residents were paying high-end prices – frequently more than $1 million in the case of the Ritz — to live in other condos in the same buildings.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | August 14, 1992
TORONTO -- Arthur Rhodes vaguely remembers pitching against Doug Linton earlier this year, when both were in the International League."Yeah, I pitched against him [for Rochester] when he was aSyracuse," said the Orioles left-hander. But he couldn't recall any of the particulars.And Linton wasn't even sure the two had ever pitched in thsame game. "I've seen him [Rhodes] before, but I really don't know if I faced him," he said.Chances are that both will remember a lot more about their duehere yesterday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
When Orioles manager Buck Showalter juggled his lineup an hour before Thursday night's game to insert previously hobbled Luke Scott into left field, he considered having struggling Adam Jones take a seat. Showalter could have used the opportunity to get left-handers Scott, who had missed three games with a strained right groin, and Felix Pie in the lineup together against Detroit right-hander Brad Penny. Showalter, though, sat Pie and stuck with the right-handed-hitting Jones, and the center fielder busted out of his early-season slump in a big way, hitting a two-run homer in the sixth and adding a game-deciding sacrifice fly in a five-run seventh as the Orioles topped the Tigers, 9-5. "To say it never crossed my mind wouldn't be completely honest, but it wasn't something I did," Showalter said about resting Jones, who entered the game 2-for-19 in the season's first five games.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | June 3, 2012
Towards the end of this quiet though affective episode, Glen Bishop asks Don, "Why does everything turn out crappy?" Yikes, the kid is right. Well, in this hour anyway. First things first: Saddled by severe money woes, a perceived failure in business and general unhappiness with his life, Lane Pryce hangs himself behind the door of his SCDP office. It was a disturbing scene, clearly. But made even more so by the look in Don's face when he urges the group to cut him down instead of wait for the coroner.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
When Orioles manager Buck Showalter juggled his lineup an hour before Thursday night's game to insert previously hobbled Luke Scott into left field, he considered having struggling Adam Jones take a seat. Showalter could have used the opportunity to get left-handers Scott, who had missed three games with a strained right groin, and Felix Pie in the lineup together against Detroit right-hander Brad Penny. Showalter, though, sat Pie and stuck with the right-handed-hitting Jones, and the center fielder busted out of his early-season slump in a big way, hitting a two-run homer in the sixth and adding a game-deciding sacrifice fly in a five-run seventh as the Orioles topped the Tigers, 9-5. "To say it never crossed my mind wouldn't be completely honest, but it wasn't something I did," Showalter said about resting Jones, who entered the game 2-for-19 in the season's first five games.
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