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Big Trouble

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By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | October 5, 1997
Anthony Lukas, whom I admired greatly as a writer and as a friend of almost 30 years, took his own life last June 4. Our friendship could be reason to distrust my judgment of his final book: "Big Trouble: A Murder in a Small Western Town Sets off a Struggle for the Soul of America"(Simon & Schuster. 875 Pages. $32.50). Acutely aware of that peril of prejudice, I still find the work toweringly important.Its narrative begins Dec. 30, 1905, the last day of the life of Frank Steunenberg, Idaho's former governor, who was killed by a bomb at the gate of his house in Caldwell, Idaho, when he returned home that evening.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Simon Habtemariam and For The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
So what have we learned since lunch time? Jack Bauer is in London, he's there to thwart a plot to kill the president of the United States. Why? Because if POTUS dies on foreign soil, that would mean World War III. Unfortunately, President Heller (father of Audrey Heller, Jack's old flame) is losing his memory. His chief of staff grills him before he has to explain to British Parliament that an American Drone killed a convoy of US and British troops … amidst talks of a treaty … for drone use. The following takes place 1:00 pm and 2:00 pm. Jack and Chloe arrive at the pub where Yates was killed, they find out his fake girlfriend is actually a master assassin and has stolen the doomsday device.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
This past spring, author J. Anthony Lukas and Simon & Schuster publicist Victoria Meyer outlined a rigorous 21-city book tour to promote his new book, "Big Trouble," an epic account of a turn-of-the century assassination in Idaho, and its significance for a nation mired in the quicksand of class conflict and identity.Lukas' itinerary would begin Sept. 9 in Oregon, proceed to Washington state and then Idaho, the primary locale of "Big Trouble" (Simon & Schuster, $32.50). From there, Lukas was to ** blow across the West to St. Louis and Chicago, and finally return to the East Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Lisa Lee has done it again. After selling Umi Sake, the uber-popular Asian food restaurant in Cockeysville, Lee scooted a couple miles up York Road, opening a new restaurant, Fusion, in April of last year. At Fusion, Lee stuck with what she knows best: crowd-pleasing, Americanized food from across the Asian continent. The food is paired with an enthusiastic staff that knows the menu and isn't afraid to sell it, creating a deservedly popular dinner spot. Scene & Decor From the outside, Fusion looks a lot like a tiny dive bar. With few windows and a small, neon "open" sign, it seems like the type of place where people might go for cheap beer and big trouble (before opening Fusion, Lee did briefly run a bar in the space)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 5, 2002
Big Trouble is a comedy that rests on the assumption that grown men can't tell the difference between a gun and water pistol. Which is another way of saying Big Trouble is a comedy that doesn't work if you think about it too much. Cut it some slack, however, and you just might have a good time. This movie already has earned a level of notoriety it doesn't deserve: Its original September release was pushed back after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, because Touchstone executives felt the time wasn't right for a comedy whose climactic scenes involve a bomb on an airplane.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
Craig Shipley, a longtime utility infielder, once spoke of spring training this way: If you can't get excited now, if you're not optimistic, then you're in big trouble.There are a handful of teams in big trouble, with no immediate reason for optimism. As the financial disparity grows between the haves and have-nots in the game, there are those clubs reduced to the role of schedule-fillers. Even in March, it's hard to see any scenario in which these teams could possibly compete.To wit:* Milwaukee Brewers: Start with their place in the same division as the Cleveland Indians.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | September 18, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Sometime this fall, the Maryland Court of Appeals is going to decide whether Gov. Parris N. Glendening's bizarre decision to overturn 60 years of precedent and unilaterally grant collective-bargaining rights to some 40,000 state employees will stand or fall.In view of the seven-member court's ideological tint, and considering the hostile reception it gave lawyers opposing the administration plan when the collective-bargaining case was argued last week in Annapolis, there's little doubt it will come down on the governor's side, probably unanimously.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | December 31, 1990
Oh, those wild pitches!Last year at this time a lot of psychics were throwing wild balls in their predictions for what was ahead in 1990. And, boy, did they miss the plate.Here are a few of last year's whoppers, culled from the National Enquirer and other sources, that were supposed to take place during the past 12 months:Los Angeles psychic Maria Graciette said a meteorite would crash into the White House Rose Garden, placing President and Mrs. Bush at risk from radiation. Although 1990 still has a few hours to go, is there a bookmaker alive who wouldn't offer 1,000-1 odds against it?
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | December 11, 1991
You know chutzpah?Here's chutzpah: It's when John Williams walks into an arbitration hearing to determine whether the Bullets owe him the pay they withheld on account of his weight, and he weighs maybe 310 pounds. In the middle of the basketball season.This is like coming to a Greenpeace meeting holding a club and wearing a sealskin coat.Hasn't Williams ever seen one of those murder-trial movies where the blond temptress comes to court wearing glasses and with her hair tucked under her hat, trying to look like someone who belongs to a knitting society?
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | December 18, 2004
IN THE LAST two episodes of the TV show West Wing, U.S. President Josiah Bartlet, whose multiple sclerosis flares up now and then, found himself in a wheelchair as he flew to a Beijing summit. What a sad but apt metaphor for the rapid ascendancy of China these days relative to America. Skipping considerable caveats for the big picture: America - gushing red ink from its profligate spending - confronts the limits of its vast military power, wealth and influence in the world. Its popularity is falling, along with the value of its currency.
NEWS
By Ragina C. Averella | June 19, 2011
In meetings with members of Congress and their staffs this month, I was very clear about my reason for being there: AAA Mid-Atlantic is strongly opposed, on behalf of its members and all motorists, to any increase in the size and weight of tractor-trailer trucks. The trucks we see every day on I-95 and the Baltimore Beltway are plenty big already. I am supported in this position by a December 2010 Maryland public opinion poll, commissioned by AAA Mid-Atlantic. The poll showed 85 percent of Maryland drivers opposing any increase to the size or weight of tractor-trailer trucks, with 70 percent of respondents stating they are "strongly opposed" to any such move.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | December 14, 2009
Been to Laurel Park Race Course lately? Or ever? For folks who travel often along the I-95 corridor between Washington and Wilmington, Del., it's worth making a stop at this horsy outdoor oasis a bit south of Baltimore. Odds are, the charming old oval won't be there much longer. Sad enough will be silencing those pounding hoofs and the urgent cries of encouragement from bettors. But Laurel's potential shuttering highlights a much larger retreat of one of the remaining bulwarks against the creep of poisonous suburban sprawl: the working horse properties in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
Judging from the actions of coach Wade Phillips, WR Terrell Owens and CB Adam Jones, the Cowboys are either unraveling in Week 6 or playing an inside joke. This much seems clear: After losing to the Redskins and nearly the Bengals, they aren't the same team that won their first three games decisively. Phillips was so incensed by a reporter's suggestion that Dallas "stunk" against Cincinnati that he stalked off in mid-news conference. Owens went from complaining one week about his number of chances per game to crying in front of the media over the loss of a family member the next.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | July 11, 2006
PHILADEPHIA -- No one should be surprised that Israel would react harshly when Palestinians shell its towns and kidnap an Israeli soldier from within its pre-1967 borders. A Hamas government that tolerates - or can't control - such behavior is asking for drastic retaliation. But let's hope the spiraling violence in Gaza will shake the White House out of its dangerous lethargy on the Palestinian issue. Israel and the Palestinians on their own can't keep the situation from deteriorating further.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN REPORTER | January 10, 2006
From the December 1967 Ice Bowl in Green Bay to the January 2002 tuck rule game in New England, the NFL's postseason is filled with jarring examples of home-field conditions that proved decisive. The Packers put the Dallas Cowboys on ice in the 1967 NFL championship game to demonstrate how valuable home-field advantage can be. Thirty-four years later, the Patriots launched their dynasty years and reinforced that idea with an overtime win against the Oakland Raiders in a Foxborough snowstorm.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | December 18, 2004
IN THE LAST two episodes of the TV show West Wing, U.S. President Josiah Bartlet, whose multiple sclerosis flares up now and then, found himself in a wheelchair as he flew to a Beijing summit. What a sad but apt metaphor for the rapid ascendancy of China these days relative to America. Skipping considerable caveats for the big picture: America - gushing red ink from its profligate spending - confronts the limits of its vast military power, wealth and influence in the world. Its popularity is falling, along with the value of its currency.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 28, 2000
Yesterday morning, the mayor of Baltimore arose and picked up his daily newspaper, where he saw that six people had been shot in his city, three of them fatally. In an era of 300 annual homicides, this was regarded as a routine trauma. Then the mayor's daughter Grace, the 8-year-old, added to the morning's trouble. Her parents had lost her report card. This was regarded merely as catastrophe. "Now, Grace," said the mayor, "it won't be the first time a report card has been lost." "No," said Grace, "but it'll be the second time you've lost mine."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Lisa Lee has done it again. After selling Umi Sake, the uber-popular Asian food restaurant in Cockeysville, Lee scooted a couple miles up York Road, opening a new restaurant, Fusion, in April of last year. At Fusion, Lee stuck with what she knows best: crowd-pleasing, Americanized food from across the Asian continent. The food is paired with an enthusiastic staff that knows the menu and isn't afraid to sell it, creating a deservedly popular dinner spot. Scene & Decor From the outside, Fusion looks a lot like a tiny dive bar. With few windows and a small, neon "open" sign, it seems like the type of place where people might go for cheap beer and big trouble (before opening Fusion, Lee did briefly run a bar in the space)
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | September 18, 2004
RAVENS CENTER Casey Rabach was sitting on a stool in front of his locker unwrapping knee braces with his head down when someone asked him about tomorrow's game against the Pittsburgh Steelers, when Rabach will have to direct as much traffic as a downtown New York City cop at rush hour. "We're not changing our game plan, but you've got to be more aware because they have guys coming from anywhere and everywhere," said Rabach, who calls out blocking assignments. "They bring safeties, they bring corners.
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