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SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN REPORTER | November 21, 2005
STORRS, CONN. -- His open jumper did not go down, but Rudy Gay hustled back and helped force a turnover. After the next whistle, Gay pantomimed the shooting motion. He squared his shoulders, got his right hand under an imaginary ball, bent his knees, pointed his right elbow at a distant rim and let fire. It was a fluid, textbook practice during a break in an exhibition game except for one thing: Gay forgot to follow through and flick his wrist. A part of Gay resists the lead role at the University of Connecticut, because the 6-foot-9 sophomore is still growing, into his game and his body.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By JAMES S. GRANELLI | October 6, 2005
Bothered by fees for directory-assistance calls? Worried about your address and phone number plastered across the Internet? Looking for an easy way to share photos with family or leave voice messages for large groups or track what happens to e-mailed documents? The solutions might be among the 65 products and services unveiled at the semiannual DEMO show, which took place last month in Huntington Beach, Calif. "This is a great place to come with a new idea to engage the audience," said marketing consultant Amy D. Wohl of Narberth, Pa., who has been attending shows since they began in 1990.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 25, 2005
Terrence McNally's Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune is a play about intimacy -- physical intimacy at the beginning and emotional intimacy by the end. The journey from one to the other makes up the middle of this candid look at midlife love, receiving a provocative but poignant production at Everyman Theatre, under Vincent M. Lancisi's direction. Candid, in this case, means nudity and what is commonly referred to as "frank sexual content." But while there's more of this than audiences may be accustomed to at Everyman, Frankie and Johnny is one of the gentler, more romantic plays by the Tony Award-winning author of Love!
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2005
VIERA, Fla. - A man who knows a little something about power hitting in Baltimore believes Sammy Sosa will have a productive season at Camden Yards. "There's no doubt in my mind that he will," said Washington Nationals manager and former Orioles great Frank Robinson. "I don't know what people are measuring him by, maybe by hitting 60 home runs or whatever. "I don't think he'll hit 60, but I think he'll have a real good year. That's a very good ballpark to hit in." It may not happen right away, but Robinson expects Sosa to return to form, despite switching leagues.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
COLLEGE PARK - Ralph Friedgen didn't spend much time yesterday reflecting on or analyzing what went wrong for Maryland during the 2004 season. Whatever happened, it was in the past, and instead of reliving four months of frustration, he preferred to look ahead. "I'm pretty focused right now," Friedgen said. Much of Friedgen's focus over the next eight months will be deciding on Maryland's quarterback for 2005, a situation that is, in some respects, just as muddled now as it was a year ago. Friedgen said that there will be no clear-cut leader going into spring drills, and that Jordan Steffy, Sam Hollenbach and Joel Statham will all have plenty to prove if they want to win the job outright.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 9, 2004
Say you're an up-and-coming contemporary art enthusiast and you're trying to spot the Next Big Thing. What to do? Well, you could bone up on your connoisseurship - sharpen an expert eye for line, color, etc. But maybe you've done that; the next best thing might be to look for "dark matter." Artistic "dark matter," like the celestial kind astronomers search for through their telescopes, is that 90 percent of the whole enchilada we can't see, even though we know it's got to be there. It's what Baltimore Museum of Art contemporary art curator Chris Gilbert calls the welter of images, objects, performances, happenings and collective projects by mostly younger artist-activists that lie just under the radar screens of mainstream institutions like art museums and galleries.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH exhibits a moral certitude toward the war in Iraq, and it serves him well. If the war is about fighting "evil," it doesn't much matter what the evil looks like; it could be found in weapons of mass destruction or dictators' torture chambers or fanatic beheaders or roadside bombers. If evil is the target, Iraq must surely be the right place to fight it, because there's plenty of it there. The president strips aside the little things, and concentrates on the one big thing -- what we advisedly would call the American crusade in the Middle East.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 12, 2004
NEW YORK - Chic, sexy people mill about the joint - chatting, laughing, nursing cocktails. For industry insiders, the place to be on a rainy May evening is Crash Mansion, a multilevel club in Manhattan with stone-embedded walls and sleek furniture. It is here at a well-attended showcase where newcomer Ricky Fante, a Maryland-raised homeboy, will preview what is supposed to be one of the year's hottest debuts. On this night, the release of Rewind, the singer's album in stores tomorrow, is two months away.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2004
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - As the Orioles conclude another morning workout, with players gathering on the main field for some last-minute instruction, the sky suddenly grows dark, as if a switch has been flicked to the down position. A large shadow encases each uniformed body, and it's no longer necessary to squint. Have storm clouds moved in, or is Walter Young blocking the sun again? Young is listed at 6 feet 5, 296 pounds, but he's about more than just size. The Orioles weren't looking for a defensive lineman when they claimed him off waivers from the Pittsburgh Pirates in November, though he played end for his Mississippi high school.
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