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By STEPHEN MANES and STEPHEN MANES,New York Times News Service | February 16, 1998
THE HOPE of catching a glimpse of the Next Big Thing or selling stock in it sent about 800 computer folk, venture capitalists and reporters to Indian Wells, Calif., this month. Like its predecessors, the Demo 98 conference focused on live demonstrations with the bracing potential for embarrassing public failure.A couple of years ago, the Big Thing was a little thing, the Palm Pilot hand-held device, which created a new product category so successful that competitors have been flattering it with sincere imitation.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
About one in five cars on American roadways connects to outside parties via cellular telephone networks, transmitting data on drivers' speeding and braking habits, their location, and their vehicle's health and performance. By 2025, AAA predicts, all new cars will. Computers on board most vehicles on the road already collect and monitor such data, which can be downloaded at dealerships for repair purposes and shared with manufacturers, who say it's used to make cars safer and more reliable.
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SPORTS
By Stefen Lovelace and Stefen Lovelace,Sun reporter | October 21, 2007
Wearing slightly faded jeans that hang low but comfortably over white sneakers, Tavon Austin glides through the busy hallway of Dunbar High. Under his left arm, he carries a notebook and a binder. On his wrists are names tattooed in dark, cursive lettering. His grandmother's name, Louann, is on his right wrist. His mother's name, Cathy, is on his left. Girls walk up to him and pull at his oversized hoodie, which drapes loosely over a lime-green collared polo shirt. They giggle as they say his name.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
Sarah Cullison started her sports career playing soccer and softball in the North Carroll Rec Council, but she liked the faster pace of soccer, so she soon switched from softball to lacrosse. Now, the senior is a top-notch defender for Manchester Valley's successful soccer and lacrosse teams. This spring, Cullison has helped the No. 12 Mavericks' lacrosse team to the best start in school history, 9-0 heading into Thursday night's home game vs. No. 13 Century, their top Carroll County opponent.
TRAVEL
By Patricia Rodriguez | April 20, 2003
Juan isn't in charge at the Hotel Mahahual, in Mexico, but he might as well be. Of several employees sitting in the office on a slow Sunday afternoon, he is the one most interested in dealing with my inept Spanish and in practicing his equally shaky English. Any time our clumsy conversation wanders into an area he thinks might interest other visitors, he asks for the English translation. "Hot water," he repeats carefully. "Where would you like to call?" he asks, hovering over the hotel's phone, the only place in town to make international calls.
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | November 17, 2008
Once touted as "The Next Big Thing" in pro wrestling, Brock Lesnar is now the big thing in mixed martial arts. I just finished watching the highlights of Lesnar's convincing victory over Randy Couture in Saturday night's UFC pay-per-view. Admittedly, I don't know a lot about MMA, but I know enough to be impressed by Lesnar pummeling a UFC legend to win the heavyweight title in just his fourth fight. With the victory, Lesnar, to my knowledge, became the only man to be both a world champion in a major wrestling organization and a UFC champion.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Orioles catcher Steve Clevenger regularly made it to Opening Day at Camden Yards growing up, even if it meant missing school. Clevenger grew up just across the street from Oriole Park in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore, so making his first Opening Day roster with the Orioles is special. “It's a dream come true,” Clevenger said Sunday. “I get to play for my hometown team, the team I grew up rooting for. It's a special time.” Not long ago, Clevenger was sitting in the stands on Opening Day. “All the time,” he said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 1, 2011
The last time Billy Cundiff missed a field-goal attempt (two, actually, against the St. Louis Rams on Sept. 25), the Ravens kicker embarked on a streak of 10 straight field goals. Cundiff got off to a fast start in Sunday's 30-27 win against the Arizona Cardinals, converting all three chances including the 25-yarder with no time remaining. “I was really disappointed in my effort [last week],” Cundiff said of his miss from 51 yards in the Ravens' 12-7 loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars eight days ago. “It was one of the worst kicks of my career.
SPORTS
By GENE COLLIER and GENE COLLIER,PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE | January 16, 2009
The difference between the Steelers and the Ravens isn't wide enough to slide a Ritz cracker through. On its edge. Both meetings took almost forever to decide, one going 59:17 before a disputed winning touchdown, the only touchdown, and the other couldn't be settled in the customary 60 minutes, requiring more than six minutes of bonus mayhem. That the Steelers won both times indicates, depending on your perspective, either something or nothing. It would appear therefore, that this AFC championship game will turn on little things, very little things, wicked little things.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
At 3-1, the Towson men's basketball team is off to its best start since the 2008-09 season, when that squad also won three of its first four games. The Tigers will get a true barometer of their progress when they travel to Lawrence, Kan., to meet the No. 2 Jayhawks on Friday night. Kansas, which has won three national championships, is 2-0 against Towson, and coach Pat Skerry said the Jayhawks are well deserving of the acclaim they are receiving. “I think they're the best team in the country,” Skerry said Wednesday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Orioles catcher Steve Clevenger regularly made it to Opening Day at Camden Yards growing up, even if it meant missing school. Clevenger grew up just across the street from Oriole Park in the Pigtown neighborhood of Baltimore, so making his first Opening Day roster with the Orioles is special. “It's a dream come true,” Clevenger said Sunday. “I get to play for my hometown team, the team I grew up rooting for. It's a special time.” Not long ago, Clevenger was sitting in the stands on Opening Day. “All the time,” he said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
At 3-1, the Towson men's basketball team is off to its best start since the 2008-09 season, when that squad also won three of its first four games. The Tigers will get a true barometer of their progress when they travel to Lawrence, Kan., to meet the No. 2 Jayhawks on Friday night. Kansas, which has won three national championships, is 2-0 against Towson, and coach Pat Skerry said the Jayhawks are well deserving of the acclaim they are receiving. “I think they're the best team in the country,” Skerry said Wednesday afternoon.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | April 5, 2012
This past weekend I had a chance to soak in the WrestleMania 28 festivities from Miami - the Hall of Fame, Fan Axxess, the event itself at Sun Life Stadium and Raw the next night. Truly, for any WWEfan that came to participate in the crowd chants and invest themselves fully into the emotion of the stories being told, it would have been an absolutely draining 72 hours. Yet despite the Hell in a Cell curtain call, Sheamus pounding Daniel Bryan in 18 seconds (spawning a “YES!” chant that lasted through WrestleMania and in every segment of Raw, that will now transcend the superstar himself; also heard at the Miami Heat/Philadelphia 76ers game Tuesday)
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 1, 2011
The last time Billy Cundiff missed a field-goal attempt (two, actually, against the St. Louis Rams on Sept. 25), the Ravens kicker embarked on a streak of 10 straight field goals. Cundiff got off to a fast start in Sunday's 30-27 win against the Arizona Cardinals, converting all three chances including the 25-yarder with no time remaining. “I was really disappointed in my effort [last week],” Cundiff said of his miss from 51 yards in the Ravens' 12-7 loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars eight days ago. “It was one of the worst kicks of my career.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
When Sandy Rosenblatt looked in the mirror, the striking brunette could see nothing but one big flaw — her eyes, which were sunken and seemed a little dark. So at 34 she had a plastic surgeon smooth them over. While she was there, she decided to have her long oval face made a little cheekier and her brows a little less creased. Since then the Sterling, Va., resident has had to return to her doctor in Baltimore several times a year for new applications of commercial fillers and wrinkle removers, a drawback of such products.
SPORTS
February 22, 2011
It's too soon to tell George Diaz Orlando Sentinel It's awfully tempting to jump on the Trevor Bayne bandwagon — restrictor plates in place, of course — and celebrate a new era in stock car racing. And that would be truly preposterous. You want to root for the kid and his team, the iconic Wood Brothers. It's easy to see why many media members broke protocol and cheered as Bayne's Ford crossed the finish line Sunday. But the morning-after reality is this: Bayne isn't even scheduled to run a full Sprint Cup season (although that could change)
NEWS
October 16, 2010
Campaign signs have likely been around since Eve convinced Adam to endorse the Apple ticket, but it's really taken the 21 s t century residents of Baltimore County to perfect the next big thing: the lawsuit over political signs. Gentle readers will recall that the county's crackdown on an oversized yard sign promoting Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s campaign for governor caused its owner to sue earlier this year. A judge subsequently ruled that the county acted within its power.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2004
COLLEGE PARK - Ralph Friedgen didn't spend much time yesterday reflecting on or analyzing what went wrong for Maryland during the 2004 season. Whatever happened, it was in the past, and instead of reliving four months of frustration, he preferred to look ahead. "I'm pretty focused right now," Friedgen said. Much of Friedgen's focus over the next eight months will be deciding on Maryland's quarterback for 2005, a situation that is, in some respects, just as muddled now as it was a year ago. Friedgen said that there will be no clear-cut leader going into spring drills, and that Jordan Steffy, Sam Hollenbach and Joel Statham will all have plenty to prove if they want to win the job outright.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2011
It was just past 10 a.m., well before many season-ticket holders had even matriculated to the front of the line and entered the main doors at FanFest, when Orioles manager Buck Showalter walked across the main stage at the Baltimore Convention Center to a standing ovation. "It's been tough on [the fans], whatever they need to embrace," said Showalter, alluding to the organization's 13 consecutive losing seasons and three straight last-place finishes in the American League East. "I'm hoping that when the season starts, that's going to be all funneled to our players and the job that they're doing on the field.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
For every powerhouse like Google, there are dozens of Internet companies that flop. Still, a decade after the dot-com bubble that burst, there is no shortage of investors trying to get a piece of the next online blockbuster. Lately, much of the hype has centered on social media. While many of the big names — Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter — may sell stock publicly through IPOs one day, they have been raising capital by selling stakes to institutional investors, venture capitalists and wealthy investors.
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